Week of February 10, 2014

Words to Pomder
For Your Health
Hunting & Shooting Products/Issues

National

Michigan
Pennsylvania
Wisconsin

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Rod & Reel Raffle

Rod & Reel Raffle

 

We are raffling off 5 rod n’ reel sets to raise funds for a local VFW Post that does a whole lot of good for returning veterans.

Your participation and purchase of a ticket – or tickets - will help us raise the necessary funds to meet our goal and help these guys; thanks.

 

Rod & Reel Raffle

 

Tickets $20.00 each      Only 500 tickets to be sold

Proceeds to aid Veterans

 

5 winners (100 to 1 odds)

 

Brands to be raffled include:

Abu Garcia       Okuma             Pflueger

Pinnacle   Quantum   All Star

 

High-end pro edition units in sets or combination

Spinning and Baitcast sets                   IM 8 rods in 6', 7 and 8' lengths

 

For detailed rod & reel info: click here

 

For Your Health

Anthrax faces silent war with giant, deadly virus

The University of California reports that although the anthrax bacterium strikes fear in the hearts of many, it has its own mortal enemy—a huge, deadly virus, researchers have found.

 

Scientists are hoping the virus could help lead to an effective treatment against anthrax and some related pathogens that cause food poisoning. Investigators have also been looking for such new treatments because antibiotics don’t work as well as they used to—bacteria are evolving counter­measures, or resistance.

 

Investigators uncovered the anti-anthrax virus, called a bacteriophage, in zebras that had died from anthrax in Etosha National Park, Namibia. The research is published Jan. 27 in the journal  PLoS One.

 

The anthrax bacterium, Bacillus anthracis, forms spores that survive in soil for a long time. Zebras are infected when they pick up the spores while grazing; the bacteria multiply and when the animal dies, they form spores that return to the soil.

 

While the bacterium invades and kills the animal, bacteriophages, literally “bacteria eaters,” are viruses that invade and kill bacteria, the scientists explained.

 

The first thing the team noticed was that the virus was a voracious predator of the anthrax bacterium, said Holly Ganz, a research scientist at the University of California, Davis Genome Center and co-author of the paper. They also noticed the virus, named Bacillus phage Tsamsa, is one of the largest known bacteriophages, with a giant head, a long tail and a large genome.

 

 

Tsamsa in­fects not only  B. anthracis but also some closely related bacteria, including strains of  Bacillus cereus, which can cause food poisoning, the investigators added. Decoding the genome let researchers identify the gene for lysin, a compound the virus uses to kill bacterial cells, they said. That itself has potential use as an antibiotic or disinfecting agent.

 

 Bacteriophages are often highly specific to one strain of bacteria, and when they were first discovered in the early 20th century there was strong interest in them as antimicrobial agents. But the discovery of penicillin and other antibiotics eclipsed phage treatments in the West. “With growing concerns about antibiotic resistance and super­bugs, people are coming back to look at phages,” said Ganz.

 


Smoking Linked with Increased Risk of Most Common Type of Breast Cancer

Young women who smoke and have been smoking a pack a day for a decade or more have a significantly increased risk of developing the most common type of breast cancer. That is the finding of an analysis published early online in Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The study indicates that an increased risk of breast cancer may be another health risk incurred by young women who smoke.

 

The majority of recent studies evaluating the relationship between smoking and breast cancer risk among young women have found that smoking is linked with an increased risk; however, few studies have evaluated risks according to different subtypes of breast cancer.

 

To investigate, Christopher Li, MD, PhD, of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, and his colleagues conducted a population-based study consisting of 778 patients with estrogen receptor positive

breast cancer and 182 patients with triple-negative breast cancer.

Estrogen receptor positive breast cancer is the most common subtype of breast cancer, while triple-negative breast cancer is less common but

 tends to be more aggressive. Patients in the study were 20 to 44 years old and were diagnosed from 2004-2010 in the Seattle-Puget Sound metropolitan area. The study also included 938 cancer-free controls.

 

The researchers found that young women who were current or recent smokers and had been smoking a pack a day for at least 10 years had a 60 percent increased risk of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer. In contrast, smoking was not related to a woman’s risk of triple-negative breast cancer.

 

“The health hazards associated with smoking are numerous and well known. This study adds to our knowledge in suggesting that with respect to breast cancer, smoking may increase the risk of the most common molecular subtype of breast cancer but not influence risk of one of the rarer, more aggressive subtypes,” said Dr. Li.


 

Words to Ponder

Liberal Paradise

"A "Liberal Paradise" would be a place where everybody has guaranteed employment, free comprehensive healthcare, free education, free food, free housing, free clothing, free utilities, and only law enforcement has

guns. And, believe it or not, such a place does indeed exist;  It's called prison".

Sheriff Joe Arpaio, Maricopa County AZ Sheriff's Office 


 

Hunting & Shooting Products/Issues

Winchester recalls .22 Ammo

Winchester has released the following notice on their website about some of their .22LR ammo.  The ammo affected is 2 lots of their M*22* 40gr ammo. The issue is that some of the rounds could be double charged. A double charge is one of the worst ammo defects you can experience as it could possibly cause damage to a firearm and/or harm to the shooter or bystanders.

 

Here is the full press release

Olin Corporation, through its Winchester Division, is recalling two (2) lots of M*22™ 22 Long Rifle 40 Grain Black Copper Plated Round Nose rimfire ammunition.

Symbol Number: S22LRT
Lot Numbers: GD42L and GD52L

 

Winchester has determined the above lots of 22 Long Rifle rimfire ammunition may contain double powder charges. Ammunition with double powder charges may subject the shooter or bystanders to a risk of serious personal injury and/or death, or cause firearm damage, rendering the firearm inoperable.

 

DO NOT USE WINCHESTER M*22™ 22 Long Rifle RIMFIRE 

AMMUNITION WITH LOT NUMBERS GD42L or GD52L. The ammunition Lot Number is imprinted (stamped without ink) on the left tuck flap of the 500-round carton as indicated here. The 1000-round intermediate carton does not have a Lot Number.

 

To determine if your ammunition is subject to this notice, review the Symbol Number and Lot Number. If it is Symbol Number S22LRT with a Lot Number containing GD42L or GD52L immediately discontinue use and contact Winchester toll-free at 866-423-5224 or visit http://www.winchester.com/Product-Service/Pages/Contact-Us.aspx for free UPS pick-up of the recalled ammunition.

 

This notice applies only to Symbol Number S22LRT with Lot Numbers GD42L and GD52L. Other Symbol Numbers or Lot Numbers are not subject to this recall.

 

If you have any questions concerning this 22 Long Rifle rimfire ammunition recall please call toll-free 866-423-5224, write to Winchester (600 Powder Mill Road, East Alton, IL 62024 Attn: S22LRT Recall), or contact Winchester Customer Support online.

 


 

National

Monumental Sportsmen's Legislation pending
House to Vote on Historic Sportsmen’s Package

In the next few days, the House of Representatives is expected to vote on the Sportsmen’s Act of 2014, which includes 8 bills that will benefit the sportfishing community, as well as recreational shooters and hunters. This historic legislation provides for increased access and the protection of traditional tackle.

 

Your participation is greatly needed.  Send a message to your Representative today urging them to vote for this historic legislation.

Of greatest importance to recreational anglers in this package are:

  • The Recreational Fishing and Hunting Heritage Opportunities Act -- Directs U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management managers to facilitate recreational fishing and hunting on public lands and waters and to evaluate how these traditional outdoor activities will be impacted by the implementation of new regulations, management plans or land use initiatives.

 
  • The Hunting, Fishing, and Recreational Shooting Protection Act - This section will prevent attempts to federally ban lead in recreational fishing equipment and ammunition components by clarifying the Toxic Substances Control Act.  Recent petitions and court actions by anti-fishing and anti-hunting groups have attempted to impose a federal ban on lead in both fishing and hunting equipment.

 

The most effective thing you can do is send a message and call your Representative’s office, and simply tell them to vote YES on H.R. 3590

 

 

 

 

 


Winchester recalls .22 Ammo

Winchester has released the following notice on their website about some of their .22LR ammo.  The ammo affected is 2 lots of their M*22* 40gr ammo. The issue is that some of the rounds could be double charged. A double charge is one of the worst ammo defects you can experience as it could possibly cause damage to a firearm and/or harm to the shooter or bystanders.

 

Here is the full press release

Olin Corporation, through its Winchester Division, is recalling two (2) lots of M*22™ 22 Long Rifle 40 Grain Black Copper Plated Round Nose rimfire ammunition.

Symbol Number: S22LRT
Lot Numbers: GD42L and GD52L

 

Winchester has determined the above lots of 22 Long Rifle rimfire ammunition may contain double powder charges. Ammunition with double powder charges may subject the shooter or bystanders to a risk of serious personal injury and/or death, or cause firearm damage, rendering the firearm inoperable.

 

DO NOT USE WINCHESTER M*22™ 22 Long Rifle RIMFIRE

 

AMMUNITION WITH LOT NUMBERS GD42L or GD52L. The ammunition Lot Number is imprinted (stamped without ink) on the left tuck flap of the 500-round carton as indicated here. The 1000-round intermediate carton does not have a Lot Number.

 

To determine if your ammunition is subject to this notice, review the Symbol Number and Lot Number. If it is Symbol Number S22LRT with a Lot Number containing GD42L or GD52L immediately discontinue use and contact Winchester toll-free at 866-423-5224 or visit http://www.winchester.com/Product-Service/Pages/Contact-Us.aspx for free UPS pick-up of the recalled ammunition.

 

This notice applies only to Symbol Number S22LRT with Lot Numbers GD42L and GD52L. Other Symbol Numbers or Lot Numbers are not subject to this recall.

 

If you have any questions concerning this 22 Long Rifle rimfire ammunition recall please call toll-free 866-423-5224, write to Winchester (600 Powder Mill Road, East Alton, IL 62024 Attn: S22LRT Recall), or contact Winchester Customer Support online.

 


 

2014 Farm Bill now law, ending long struggle

Bill is a win for conservation

WASHINGTON – Feb. 7, 2014 – On Friday, February 7, President Obama signed the 2014 Farm Bill, ending years of legislative uncertainty for farmers and conservationists alike.

 

After nearly four years of fighting between Democrats and Republicans, the massive package was unveiled last week and approved by Congress in just a matter of days. It was the first time Congress has approved a new Farm Bill since 2008.

 

The deal also saves billions by consolidating government conservation programs. Government estimates say it is supposed to cut $16 billion in government spending in the next decade. The bill has changes to programs involving environmental regulations on farms, aid to dairy and sheep farmers and the kind of food the U.S. Agriculture Department may buy for the Nation’s food banks.

 

This bill includes proactive and common sense conservation programs

 

that will help deter wetland and other habitat loss, incentivize habitat conservation and keep working farmers and ranchers on their land.  The

2014 Farm Bill includes the conservation and sporting community’s top priorities of re-coupling conservation compliance to crop insurance and a Sodsaver program affecting the top duck producing states of Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota.

 

Conservation provisions included in the 2014 Farm Bill are designed to encourage the conservation of our nation’s remaining wetlands and grasslands, which help keep our waters clean, prevent soil erosion and provide vital habitat for waterfowl and other wildlife.

 

 

The $956.4 billion package includes a sweeping overhaul of Federal farm and nutrition policies on what farmers grow, how food is packaged and sold and how the government helps the poor pay for their food.  The 959-page bill ends billions of dollars in direct subsidy payments to farmers. In their place, farmers may take advantage of a new crop insurance program, the newspaper said.


 

Michigan

DNR releases information on actively managing cormorants 

The Michigan DNR announced figures from its efforts with federal partners to actively manage cormorants in several parts of Michigan.

 

For years anglers have observed cormorants feeding in their favorite fishing spots, with substantial increases in bird numbers over the past few decades. These observations have concerned anglers about the potential effects cormorants may be having on the fish they are targeting. In response to these growing concerns, the federal government enacted a depredation order in 2003 that authorized states, tribes and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to conduct cormorant management, with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service overseeing the process. Under this authority, the DNR developed management goals at several cormorant breeding colonies across the state to determine what, if any, impacts cormorants were having on the state’s fishery resources. On-the-ground work to meet these goals is conducted by USDA’s Wildlife Services, which began oiling eggs and culling cormorants in the Les Cheneaux Islands in 2004.

 

Since that time, Wildlife Services has expanded its operations to include efforts at Thunder Bay (Alpena), Beaver Island, Ludington and Bays de Noc (Escanaba), with the culling of up to 10,000 birds per year for the past several years. Subsequently, cormorant nesting populations have been reduced anywhere from 54 percent to 94 percent at peak nesting counts at these locations. In colonies where management efforts have

 

been conducted, the estimated cormorant nest count in Michigan waters

has gone from more than 23,000 in 2007 to less than 10,000 in 2013.

 

In addition to these efforts, Wildlife Services has directed volunteer groups in harassment programs at many inland lakes and Great Lakes bays during spring migration periods. Volunteer groups also assisted in cormorant harassment programs during stocking events at many Great Lakes ports. Each year, management locations are mutually agreed-upon by a coordination committee composed of representatives of several federal, state and tribal agencies.

 

It’s difficult to evaluate the effects of cormorant management and its relationship to sport-fish populations due to constantly changing food-web dynamics, including the establishment of invasive species throughout the Great Lakes,” said Steve Scott, Michigan DNR fisheries biologist. “Fisheries surveys have shown an increase in sport-fish populations during the same period cormorant populations were declining in areas where activities have been conducted. We are seeing some very encouraging results in fisheries at several locations, and anglers are reporting improvements. We are very pleased with the progress we are making through our partnership with Wildlife Services."

 

USDA website cormorants: www.aphis.usda.gov/wildlife_damage/aquaculture/aquaculture

_cormorant.shtml.


DNR announces 2014 Black Lake season harvest results  

DNR officials announced the 2014 Black Lake sturgeon harvest season lasted 82 minutes on Saturday, Feb. 1, with six fish being harvested. The fishing season, which included spearing or hook-and-line fishing, was scheduled to run Feb. 1-5, or until the harvest quota had been reached.

 

“The 2014 allocation of Black Lake sturgeon for the State of Michigan was six fish, although DNR officials imposed a voluntary quota of five fish for recreational anglers,” said Todd Grischke, Lake Huron Basin coordinator. “Establishing this one-fish buffer before the fishing season allowed us to stay within our allocation of six fish. This year is a great example of how our harvest allocation model and on-ice communication effectively reduce the chance of overharvest of lake sturgeon in Black Lake.”

There were 228 registered anglers on the ice on Saturday, down from 268 the year before. Most anglers registered at the pre-registration held on Jan. 31, which allowed for a much more streamlined process. 

 

According to Tim Cwalinski, DNR fisheries biologist, lake sturgeon were moving the last couple days, including opening day, which meant more fish were able to be seen by anglers. The first three fish were harvested before 8:45 a.m. opening day, then a short flurry of activity occurred just after 9:15 a.m. as three additional fish were harvested.

 

The sturgeon fishing hotline was updated at 9:19 a.m. and officially closed the season. In addition, signal cannons and sirens were used to signal the season’s end. DNR law enforcement officials and other DNR personnel were embedded in the fishing communities and were able to quickly report harvested fish this year, as well as to quickly contact all lake sturgeon anglers on the ice and close the season.

 

Dan Stroup, a 71-year-old retiree from Bronson, got things going shortly after fishing began at 8 a.m., with a 66-inch, 90-pound fish, which turned out to be the biggest taken this year. 

 

Stroup, who has been spearing sturgeon for 33 years, took the eighth sturgeon of his career and his fourth at Black Lake. (His other four were taken in Wisconsin.) The 90-pounder was his personal best.

 

The fish “came in beautifully,” Stroup said, about 12' down in 22' of water, swimming in from the side toward his white decoy. Stroup, who had been living in his 7½ x 13' shanty for 10 days, said he’d speared a muskie five days earlier, then covered his spearing hole and waited for Saturday.   Stroup said he’d fry and bake portions of the leviathan.“These are better than the ones in Wisconsin,” he said. “Those we smoke.”

 

Data of the six harvested fish: fish one was female, 90 lbs and 66"; fish two was female, 59 lbs and 61"; fish three was male, 70 lbs and 66"; fish four was male, 12 lbs and 41"; fish five was male, 28 lbs and 51"; and fish six was male, 28 lbs and 51". Three of the six fish taken had been captured several times before by Michigan State U and DNR researchers during lake netting surveys.

 

The unlimited entry fishery paired with a significant on-ice presence of DNR personnel allows for greater participation by anglers while protecting the population of lake sturgeon in Black Lake from overharvest. It was deemed a very successful season for angler participation, fish harvest, quick response times, and from a safety perspective. Rehabilitation of lake sturgeon in the Cheboygan River watershed is a cooperative effort involving the Department of Natural Resources, the Black Lake Chapter of Sturgeon For Tomorrow, Michigan State University and Tower-Kleber Limited Partnership.

 


DNR Fisheries annual report

highlights 2013 accomplishments and activities 

A report highlighting the various activities of the DNR Fisheries Division during Fiscal Year 2013 has been produced and is now available online at www.michigan.gov/fishing.

The 2013 Fisheries Division Annual Report summarizes the programs and work completed in the past fiscal year (Oct. 1, 2012, through Sept. 30, 2013) by division staff in an effort to maintain and improve Michigan’s fishery. The report categorizes the division’s work within the five goals it developed as part of its five-year strategic plan, published in March 2013.

 

These goals include:

1) Healthy aquatic ecosystems and sustainable fish populations

2) Diverse fishing opportunities

 

3) Strategic resource partnerships

4) Strategically focused assessment and decision support tools

5) Efficient division operations

The report also includes Fisheries Division’s mission and vision, details on partnership efforts during 2013, and fisheries-related quick facts.

 

“This report provides Michigan citizens with a snapshot of Fisheries Division’s management of the state’s aquatic resources,” said Fisheries Division Chief Jim Dexter. “It helps us track our progress as we work toward completing our strategic plan and is something we are proud to share.”

 

Input on the activities of Fisheries Division is encouraged by readers of the 2013 Annual Report. All communication can be shared by email through DNR-Fish-Accomplishments@michigan.gov


 

Pennsylvania

Game Commission oks adult mentor youth hunting regulations

The Pennsylvania Game Commission recently approved regulations to implement Senate Bill 623 from the 2013 legislative session.  Final approval and adoption of this proposal is expected at the Pennsylvania Game Commission meeting in April.  Sponsored by state Senator Jake

 

Corman (R-34), SB 623 seeks to increase adult participation in hunting by authorizing the Pennsylvania Game Commission to expand its successful Mentored Youth Hunting Program to all ages, allowing a licensed hunter to take an unlicensed adult hunter afield.  This important pro-hunting reform will help with hunter recruitment and preserve Pennsylvania’s rich hunting heritage for generations to come.


 

Wisconsin

Ice and water clarity conditions for sturgeon spearing season

OSHKOSH - With the 2014 Winnebago lake sturgeon spearing season open (Feb 8), fisheries officials report that water clarity and ice conditions, the best in a decade and the keys to spearing success, continue to improve.

 

"The current water clarity conditions of 14-16 feet of visibility are the best we've seen since the 2008-2010 spearing seasons, which were all very successful spearing seasons lasting four to eight days," says Ryan Koenigs, Winnebago sturgeon biologist with the DNR.

 

Koenigs forecasts an exciting 2014 season due to favorable water clarity and ice conditions making it easier for spearers to get around on the ice

and also for them to see sturgeon underwater.  "Given the clear water, we are anticipating a relatively short season that will likely be highlighted by the harvest of many trophy sized fish," he says.

 

The prospects of really big fish are also raising expectations for the season. A record 9.5 percent of the sturgeon harvested from Lake Winnebago during the 2013 season weighed more than 100 pounds and DNR staff have routinely observed fish larger than 200 pounds in recent spring surveys.

 

Learn more about lake sturgeon and the unique winter spearing season in DNR's "Sturgeon Week" series of web features, including today's feature on record fish. 


 

Other Breaking News Items

(Click on title or URL to read full article)

 

Trout Unlimited under the microscope

The Center for Consumer Freedom — the same organization that exposed the shenanigans of the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals and The Humane Society of the United States — recently launched a campaign against sportsmen’s advocacy groups, exposing them for what they say are “radical environmentalists with a hidden far-left agenda.” Dubbed “Green Decoys,” the published report reveals how radical environmentalists are using sportsmen’s groups as camouflage to push left-wing objectives.

 

Camp Perry wind turbine project halted following threat to sue

One of several wind turbine projects planned for the shores of Lake Erie, has been halted following submission of a letter of intent to sue from American Bird Conservancy and Black Swamp Bird Observatory. The two groups had vigorously opposed the project due to its exceptionally high risk to federally protected wildlife.

 

Senate panel signs off on guns on Post Office grounds — but not in buildings

A Senate committee unanimously passed a measure Thursday to allow people to carry guns on postal service property, but killed a broader push to let gun owners carry their firearms into actual post office buildings.

 

Polar vortex winter: Lake Superior freezes over a month early
Professor Jay Austin from University of Minnesota sends along the news this morning that Lake Superior has completely frozen over, a month ahead of schedule for years when the big lake reaches complete ice cover.

 

Ice cover, snowfall expected to help Great Lakes levels make small gains by boating season
Subzero temperatures plus record snowfall in parts of Michigan and above-average amounts in Great Lakes states are expected to solidify last year’s gains in lake levels and, in some cases, help them rise closer to normal levels.

 

Great Lakes water levels are in unusual decline
The Great Lakes and Wisconsin's small lakes and aquifers water levels all rise and fall on a 13-year cycle, according to a new study. But that cycle is now mysteriously out of whack, researchers have found

 

 

The opinions expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the GLSFC, its officers or staff. 

Reproduction of any material by paid-up members of the GLSFC is encouraged but appropriate credit must be given. 

Reproduction by others without written permission is prohibited.

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