Week of April 18, 2011

Fishing beyond the Great Lakes
Hunting & Shooting Products/Issues
National

Regional

General
Lake Michigan

Indiana
Michigan
Wisconsin
Canada
Other Breaking News Items

 

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Fishing beyond the Great Lakes

Utah to release its first Tiger Muskies

The first tiger muskies ever raised in Utah will soon be swimming in six waters in the state. The tigers will be only two to three inches long when they're released but will grow fast.  Tiger muskies are created by stripping eggs

 

from a female Northern pike and then fertilizing the eggs with milt (sperm) from a male muskie. The result is a sterile fish that doesn't reproduce. Instead of spending its time reproducing, tiger muskies prey on other fish. In the process, the tigers get bigger and bigger.


Hunting & Shooting Products/Issues

Aimpoint receives award for the Micro H-1 sight

Aimpoint, the originator and worldwide leader in electronic red dot sighting technology, announced that the Aimpoint Micro H-1 sight has received an “Editor’s Choice” award from Petersen’s Hunting magazine as part of their recently published red-dot sight field test.

 

The Micro H-1 is a full featured non-magnifying compact sight that offers hunters a very high degree of versatility as it can be mounted on center and rim fire rifles, shotguns, muzzleloaders, handguns, and bows.

 

Weighing only 3.7 ounces, these sights are the smallest and lightest red dot sights tough enough to bear the Aimpoint name. The Micro H-1 is fully waterproof, has twelve brightness settings, and provides up to 50,000

 

hours (over 5 years) of battery life using a single battery.

 

“Receiving this acknowledgement from such an esteemed publication is true validation for Aimpoint,” said Steven Giordano, Aimpoint’s Vice President of Commercial Sales. “Petersen’s Hunting is one of the oldest and most prominent hunting magazines available. Their understanding of the advantages of hunting with a red dot sight, and this recognition of the Micro H-1 will assist us in delivering that same message to millions of hunters across North America”.

 

About $599.00

 

info@aimpoint.com   www.aimpoint.com    877-246-7646


Simmons compact, economical Laser Rangefinder

Simmons, a leader in high-quality, high-value sporting optics for more than 25 years, has added a laser rangefinder to its 2011 product line. The new LRF600 laser rangefinder features 4x magnification and a 600-yard laser rangefinder with +/- one-yard accuracy.

 

Available in two models - black and A-TACS camouflage - the LRF600 offers excellent quality at a great price. The 

 

new model has an easy to use vertical design with one-button operation. This compact device weighs less thaneight ounces, and features weather resistant housing designed to withstand less than ideal conditions.   The LRF600 accurately reads distances from 10-600 yards/meters, with +/- one-yard accuracy, and is powered by a single 9-volt battery. The optics feature 4x magnification and the unit has an in-view LCD display for a bright and clear sight picture.   Both units include a Simmons carrying case.  Click here for product specs.

 

About $119.99 – 139.99

www.simmonsoptics.com    800-423-3537


Bushnell Elite Series Riflescopes

Offer optical excellence and low-light performance

Bushnell has introduced its 2011 line of Elite series riflescopes. The product line features 18 models enhanced with a host of new features for optimal performance and lasting reliability.

 

Featuring fully multi-coated optics, the Elite riflescopes deliver 95 percent light transmission across 300 percent more of the visual light spectrum than before. To enhance low-light performance, Bushnell has introduced Ultra Wide Band (UWB) Coating, an anti-reflective coating that allows the best possible light from the front of the glass to the eyepiece, resulting in optimum brightness and true color across the light spectrum.

 

In addition to providing optical excellence, the Elite riflescope is engineered to withstand the rigors of shooting sports and whatever Mother Nature throws its way. Each scope in the series is 100 % waterproof, fog proof and 

 

shockproof, and the optics are protected with the patented RainGuard HD coating. The permanent, water-resistant finish causes moisture to bead up and scatter less light, allowing this scope to perform even in inclement weather.

 

Bushnell has introduced argon purging in the Elite line to ensure each scope delivers long-lasting performance. Due to its large atom size, Argon gas is less likely to dissipate from the scope body, doesn't create chemical reactions that can result in corrosion or degradation of seals, and transfers heat at a slower rate, reducing thermal conduction within the scope.

 

Hammer forged from tough, high quality T6061 aluminum, the Bushnell Elite series also features a fully integrated saddle for years of service under the toughest conditions. Backed by the Elite Bullet-Proof Warranty - a no questions asked one-year replacement warranty - the Elite series riflescopes offer optical excellence and rock-solid reliability.

 

www.bushnell.com    800-423-3537


National

USFWS announces Grey Wolves in the Western Great Lakes have recovered

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced a proposal to remove gray wolves in the Western Great Lakes area – which includes Minnesota, Michigan and Wisconsin – from the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife because wolves have recovered in this area and no longer require the protection of the Endangered Species Act.

 

Wolves in the Western Great Lakes area have exceeded recovery goals and continue to thrive. Wolf numbers total more than 4,000 animals in the three core recovery states. Minnesota’s population is estimated at 2,922 wolves; there are an estimated 557 wolves in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula and another 690 in Wisconsin. Each state has developed a plan to manage wolves once federal protection is no longer needed.

 

The proposal identifies the Western Great Lakes Distinct Population Segment (DPS) of wolves, which includes a

core area of Minnesota, Michigan, and Wisconsin, as well

as parts of adjacent states that are within the range of wolves dispersing from the core recovery area. After reviewing the latest available scientific and taxonomic information, the Service now recognizes the presence of two species of wolves in the Western Great Lakes: the gray wolf (Canis lupus), the wolf species currently listed under the ESA, and the eastern wolf (Canis lycaon), with a historical range that includes portions of eastern Canada and the northeastern United States. Recent wolf genetic studies indicate that what was formerly thought to be a subspecies of gray wolf (Canis lupus lycaon) is actually a distinct species (Canis lycaon). To establish the status of this newly recognized species, the Service is initiating a review of C. lycaon throughout its range in the United States and Canada.

 

More information on the recovery of gray wolves in the Western Great Lakes can be found at www.fws.gov/midwest/wolf/.


Regional

Congress approves Lamprey Control budget

Congress passed a 2011 funding bill on April 14 that included funding for the Great Lakes Fishery Commission at near the fiscal 2010 level.  This is extremely good news for the Great Lakes, as the House had proposed about a 20% reduction, a level of funding that would have reduced sea lamprey control significantly, boosted lamprey

abundances by hundreds of thousands, and resulted in nearly 9 million pounds of Great Lakes fish destroyed.

 

Sights now turn to fiscal 2012 funding which, by all accounts, will be a major challenge, particularly given the reduction in the program proposed by the president in his budget.


Weekly Great Lakes Water Levels for

April 15, 2011 

WEATHER CONDITIONS

Cooler than average temperatures have been recorded across the Great Lakes basin so far this week.  Some areas received heavy rain and severe weather early this week, leading to some instances of minor flooding.  There is a chance for more rain across the region this weekend, bringing ˝ inch to 1 inch of rain in some areas.  Cooler than average temperatures will continue through the weekend and into next week.  Precipitation throughout the Great Lakes basin as a whole has been above average so far for the month of April.

 

LAKE LEVEL CONDITIONS

Currently, Lakes Superior and Michigan-Huron are 7 and 9 inches, respectively, below their levels of a year ago.  Lake St. Clair is 1 inch below what it was at this time last year, while Lakes Erie and Ontario are 4 and 5 inches, respectively, higher than last year's levels. Over the next month, Lake Superior is expected to rise 3 inches while Lake Michigan-Huron is predicted to rise 4 inches.  Lakes St. Clair, Erie, and Ontario are also predicted to increase 2, 2, and 4 inches, respectively, during the next thirty days.  See our Daily Levels web page for more water level information.

 

FORECASTED MONTHLY OUTFLOWS/CHANNEL CONDITIONS

The outflow from Lake Superior into the St. Mary's River is projected to be below average for the month of April.  The outflows from Lake Huron into the St. Clair River, and from `

Lake St. Clair into the Detroit River, are expected to be

below average throughout the month of April, while Lake Erie's outflow through the Niagara River is expected to be near average.  The outflow from Lake Ontario into the St. Lawrence River is predicted to be near average.

 

ALERTS

The water levels of Lakes Superior and Michigan-Huron are below chart datum.  Lake Superior is forecasted to remain below chart datum until August, and Lake Michigan-Huron is expected to be below chart datum until June.  Users of the Great Lakes, connecting channels and St. Lawrence River should keep informed of current conditions before undertaking any activities that could be affected by changing water levels.  Mariners should utilize navigation charts and refer to current water level readings

 

Superior

Mich-Huron

St. Clair

Erie

Ontario

Level for Aug 4

600.03

577.07

573.75

571.42

245.41

Datum, in ft

601.10

577.50

572.30

569.20

243.30

Diff in inches

-13

-5

+17

+27

+25

Diff last month

+1

+3

+4

+4

+6

Diff from last yr

-7

-9

-1

+4

+5


General

Cabela's plans for Store in Saskatoon, Canada

Construction to begin summer 2011; anticipated opening in spring 2012  

SIDNEY, Neb. - Cabela's announced plans to bring the Cabela's retail experience to customers in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, and the surrounding area.

 

Cabela's expects to open the Saskatoon store in spring of 2012. The 50,000-square-foot store will be located in the Preston Crossing shopping area at the intersection of Circle Drive and Preston Avenue in northeast Saskatoon, near the University of Saskatchewan main campus. This will be the third Cabela's store in Canada, joining locations in Winnipeg, Manitoba, a former S.I.R. Warehouse Sports Store acquired and converted in 2008, and Edmonton, Alberta, to open late this summer.

 

The building's exterior will reflect Cabela's traditional store model with log construction, stonework, wood siding and metal roofing. The inside will highlight the company's next-generation layout, which is designed to immerse customers in the outdoor experience and includes conservation-themed wildlife displays and trophy animal mounts. The store will also feature a Bargain Cave and a

Fudge Shop. Construction is expected to start in July 2011.

 

Celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, Cabela's will open stores in Allen, Texas, and Springfield, Ore., in addition to the Edmonton store. The company has also announced plans to build a store in Wichita, Kan., expected to open in early spring 2012.

 

Showcasing thousands of products, including hunting, fishing, camping, hiking, boating and wildlife-watching gear, as well as outdoor clothing and outdoor-themed gifts and furnishings, Cabela's is famous for its strong brand and world-renowned reputation for delivering quality merchandise, value and legendary customer service.

 

Cabela's, which plans to hire more than 100 people from the Saskatoon area, typically attracts experienced outdoor recreationalists as employees, who join the Cabela's family of employees known for their excellent customer service skills and detailed knowledge of outdoor products.  The Preston Crossing shopping area also includes Walmart, Rona and Canadian Tire stores as anchor tenants.


Lake Michigan

Chinook harvests up 47% in 2010, outlook good for '11

MILWAUKEE -- Lake Michigan anglers had a banner year of chinook fishing in 2010, with favorable winds and other factors helping to increase harvest 47 percent, state fishery officials say.

 

"It looks like our Chinook salmon harvest by Wisconsin anglers was really good in 2010," says Brad Eggold, the Department of Natural Resources fisheries supervisor for southern Lake Michigan, who just completed analyzing surveys of what anglers caught on that water in 2010. "I don't see any reason that 2011 would not be another solid year."

 

Eggold found that anglers harvested 315,294 Chinook salmon from Lake Michigan in 2010, up from 214,621 in 2009 and 256,796 in 2008. More good news for Wisconsin anglers: they accounted for the bulk of the lake-wide haul.

 

"Total chinook salmon harvest reported by all agencies in Lake Michigan was 531,170 fish." "Wisconsin angler harvest comprised 60 percent of the total, so we did extremely well in 2010," Eggold says. "It looks like it was very good fishing on our side of the lake in 2010 with favorable wind conditions throughout most of the summer.

 

"If we get westerly winds and cooler water like we did in 2010, we're going to see good harvests of salmon and trout in 2011."  The 2010 harvest is lower than the average chinook harvest in the preceding five years (344,077) but is much higher than the average from 1988-2001.

 

Eggold says that the Chinook salmon may have benefitted from a large number of young alewives produced in 2010; recent years have seen smaller year-classes of the invasive species. Because of the smaller year-classes of alewives and the overall decrease in the forage base, all the agencies around the lake reduced chinook salmon stocking starting in 2006. "This lakewide reduction in stocking looks like it was a good move and is paying off with better chinook growth and survival," he says.

 

DNR and counterpart agencies cut stocking levels by 25 percent to better match the number of predators in the lake 

with the declining forage base. In 1989 the estimated combined lake-wide biomass of four forage species in Lake Michigan hit a peak of around 770 million pounds, most of it bloater chubs. Today, the total is less than one-seventh that.

 

In the 1970s, the prime suspect in the decline of native species was alewives where today quagga mussels and zebra mussels are usually blamed for changes in the ecosystem, according to U.S. Geological Survey research. The invasive mussels feed on plankton at the base of the food chain. Quagga mussels are considered even more damaging than zebra mussels because they can live in a wider range of water temperatures, water depths, and they feed most of the year, even in winter when zebra mussels lie dormant.

 

The lake-wide stocking reduction is also showing up in improved condition of the chinook handled at the Strawberry Creek egg collection facility during fall, according to Scott Hansen, DNR fisheries biologist in Sturgeon Bay.  "The lake-wide reduction in stocking has taken full effect now and it seems to be working," he says. "We've started to see the weights creep back up again."

 

The condition stayed about the same or was slightly down from 2009, but is still significantly better than in 2007, "when we hit historical lows for weight at age for females," Hansen says.  The average weight for 3-year-old-plus females in 2010 was 5.9 kilograms, down slightly from 6.08 kilograms in 2009, but up from 2007's 4.87 kilograms.

 

Fish hatched in the same year the stocking reductions started taking place are now leaving the fishing through harvest or through natural mortality. With fewer mouths to feed, the existing forage base is stretching farther. Sport angler harvest results, also called "creel survey results" are available for other species caught from Lake Michigan on the Lake Michigan management reports pages of the DNR website.

Get e-mail updates with weekly Lake Michigan fishing reports.  Anglers interested in fishing Lake Michigan can see what's biting when by signing up for free e-mail updates from the DNR or by directly visiting the Lake Michigan Outdoor Fishing Report.


Indiana

Indiana Dunes SP summer camp registration now open

Three summer camps at Indiana Dunes State Park will give kids the opportunity to have fun while exploring its wildlife and natural resources. The Dunes Explorer camp is for children 9-14 years old. Dates are June 14-16 and Aug. 2-4. These two camps include overnight camping in the state park.

 

The Budding Naturalist day camp is for 7-12 year olds and

runs June 28-30. Each camp costs $90 and includes food,

activities and supplies. Registration is required, and space is limited to the first 20 children for each session.  “With many expensive summer camps out there, we seek to provide a low-cost alternative that helps forge a connection with the amazing resources contained in the Indiana Dunes,” said Brad Bumgardner, park interpreter.   Campers can register at the park office, nature center, or at www.friendsofindianadunes.org

 


DNR studies muskie growth in Lake Webster

NORTH WEBSTER – A fish-tagging study being done by the Indiana DNR is shedding new light on how fast muskies grow in Lake Webster.  The results could affect the number of muskies stocked in the popular 774-acre lake in northern Kosciusko County. The results will also help DNR fisheries biologists determine if the 36" minimum size limit should be increased.

 

“Based on what we know already, Lake Webster has one of the densest populations of muskies in the Midwest,” said Jed Pearson, DNR fisheries biologist for the area. “That’s because we stock fingerling muskies each year in the lake at the rate of five per acre.”

 

Other states typically stock one or two muskies per acre and sometimes do so every other year.  “What we don’t know is whether the high density of muskies is affecting their growth,” Pearson said. “A lake can hold only so many fish. When fish densities get too high, there may not be enough food to go around.”  According to Pearson, some anglers claim the average size of muskies in Lake Webster is declining and fewer trophy-size muskies, those more than 46" long, are being caught.

 

Although length data recorded each spring from adult muskies captured during egg-taking operations do not back the claim, DNR biologists are taking a closer look at muskie growth in Lake Webster.  “Adult muskies average around 36 inches long but we occasionally catch some over 46 inches long during our hatchery egg-taking

operations in spring,” Pearson said. “What we want to know is how much a muskie grows each year and how its growth rate in Webster compares to other lakes.”

 

To study muskie growth, Pearson has tagged more than 1,300 muskies with tiny PIT (passive integrated transponder) tags since 2005. Each fish is measured before the tag is inserted into muscle tissue along the dorsal fin. The tag has a unique numerical code that’s read with a special electronic scanner. By noting changes in size from when a muskie is first tagged compared to when it is recaptured, biologists get an accurate account of how much the fish grew.

 

“Although we’re just now getting long-term data on growth, we’ve already seen a big difference between male and female muskies,” Pearson said.  Most male muskies stop growing after they reach 36 inches long. In contrast, females continue to grow about 1-2 inches per year after they reach 36 inches. Biologists call this “sexual dimorphic growth.” They think it is an evolutionary adaptation in how a fish uses energy and helps the species survive and reproduce. The difference has management implications.

 

“This means we may want to ignore the males. For management decisions, we plan to focus on how big the females grow,” Pearson said. “As long as female muskies get bigger at normal rates, we don’t think there is growth problem.”


Michigan

Michigan Fishing Guide ready

The 2011 Michigan Fishing guide is ready; don’t forget to pick one up when you buy your new fishing license. There are a few changes people need to be aware of for 2011. Below are some of the major changes, consult the guide for more info. or contact the Michigan D.N.R.

§    Statewide – All-Species Fishing License Requirement
An all-species license is required to take and possess trout, salmon, lake sturgeon, lake herring, amphibians, reptiles or crustaceans.

§    Statewide – Possession Limit
In addition to one (1)day’s daily possession limit of fish, a person may possess an additional two (2) daily possession limits of fish taken during previous fishing days provides that the additional limits of fish are processed (canned, cured by smoking or drying, or frozen). This does not apply to lake sturgeon; see p. 8 for lake sturgeon harvest restrictions.


§    Statewide – Inland Trout and Salmon Regulations
Gear restrictions have been added to an additional 82.5 miles of streams and changes have been made to regulations on some existing gear restricted streams. Minimum size limits for trout have been modified on stream Types 1-4 and lake trout possession limits and season has been changed (see guide)

 

      Lake Erie – New Walleye Possession Limits Regulations -Toll Free Information Line 888-367-7060
The daily possession limit will remain at five (5) walleye through April 30, 2011. Starting in 2011, the daily possession limit for walleye will be set May 1st each year. A special publication announcing the new daily possession limit will be available at the DNR offices and license vendors starting in April 2011. The new daily possession limit will also be announced in a statewide news release, on the DNR website.(www.michigan.gov/dnrfishing ), and in a pre-recorded message at 888-387-7060

 

      Lake Michigan – Lake Trout and Splake regulations
The daily possession limit has been changed to restrict harvest of large lake trout to one (1) lake trout 34 inches or greater and the Splake minimum size limit has been increased to 15 inches. Seasons for Lake Trout on Lake Mich. have changed based on management zone  (see guide)

Black Lake – Lake Sturgeon Harvest Quota
By
January 15, 2012, see harvest quota for Black Lake at www.michigan.gov/dnrfishing

 

 


New Lake Trout and Splake Regulations in Lake Superior

The Michigan DNR is reminding Lake Superior anglers of regulations changes for lake trout and splake this season.  The minimum size limit for splake – lake trout/brook trout hybrids -- has been increased to 15", the same as it is for lake trout. This change should negate problems some anglers have had with differentiating lake trout from splake. The change from 10" was made at the request of anglers who wanted to allow splake to attain a larger a size before being subject to harvest.

 

The five-fish creel daily limit for lake trout in waters east of

Keweenaw Peninsula has been modified so anglers may only keep one lake trout that measures 34" or longer.

 

In addition, trout regulations for the Mosquito River and Seven Mile Creek in Alger County have changed. Both were previously research streams with special regulations.  Both are Type 1 streams, with a season that runs from the last Saturday of April through Sept. 30 and a daily creel limit of five trout, no more than three measuring 15" or longer. Minimum size limits are 7" for brook trout, 8" for browns and 10" for rainbows.   For more information on fishing in Michigan, go to www.michigan.gov/dnrfishing.

 


Upcoming activities, special events/classes at local range

Archery and firearms ranges are open to the public

EAST LANSING, Mich. – If you are ready to escape winter hibernation, the Demmer Center has several upcoming opportunities to get you out of the house.

 

Activities, special events and classes are available at beginner level or for those with experience. The center is located at 3365 E. Jolly Road, Lansing. Patient, courteous National Alliance for the Development of Archery (NADA) or National Rifle Association (NRA) certified instructors teach all classes. See below for activities and schedule.

 

Special Events

Dinner and Shoot – Available to beginners or experienced shooters, join the Demmer Center for an afternoon to shoot archery, pistol or rifle. After shooting, enjoy dinner at Gilbert and Blake’s Seafood and Steak Grille in Okemos. Packaged for two, the archery shoot and dinner is $95 or $115 for the firearms shoot and dinner. Contact the Demmer Center for reservations.

 

 Shoot and Shave – Come out for the afternoon to shoot either archery or firearms and get an old-fashioned shave like you see in the old western movies, courtesy of the Shave, a unique barbershop. Individual registration is only $35, a perfect gift for any male! Contact the Demmer Center for reservations.

 

Right on Target Shooting Event – On Saturday, May 21, Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts and Venturers are welcome to join the Demmer Center for a day of shooting and safety skills. The first 32 Boy Scouts and Venturers that register will use .22-caliber rifles. Shooting air rifles, and recurve and compound bows will be included. Everyone will have

the opportunity to shoot a gun and a bow. $15 per Cub; $20 per Boy Scout or Venturer.

 

Open Shoots

Archery and firearms ranges are open to the public on Wednesdays and Fridays, 11:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturdays, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Sundays, noon to 5 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays are available for members only 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. If you shoot a traditional bow, please visit on Mondays, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

 

Classes

Introduction to Handgun Shooting: $35 (cost may be split between two people). Contact the Demmer Center to schedule.

Introduction to Rifle Shooting: $35 (cost may be split between two people). Contact the Demmer Center to schedule.
NRA Basic Pistol Certification Class: April 6, 8 and 9; $80 per person

NRA Basic Rifle Certification Class: April 13, 15, 16 and 17; $30 per person

Concealed Pistol License Class: April 27, 29 and 30. You must be at least 21 years of age. $130 per person

Bow Fishing 101 Class: April 22 and 29, and May 6 and 13, $65 per person


The Demmer Center also accommodates Michigan State U. (MSU) Archery Club and MSU Rifle & Pistol Club team activities. To register for special events, shoots, classes or for general questions, contact the Demmer Center at 517-884-0550 or www.demmercenter.msu.edu. In addition to serving its members,
the John and Marnie Shooting Sports Education and Training Center provides space for public shooting sports education courses and extramural enjoyment opportunities for the public.


Fire Season builds during Wildfire Prevention Week April 17-23

Public encouraged to focus on prevention measures this spring

Wildfire Prevention Week in Michigan is April 17-23, and the DNR is stressing the importance of preventing wildfire during the state’s critical spring fire season.  Wildfire Prevention Week is observed during the third full week of April annually in order to focus attention on the increased wildfire risk that typically occurs during this period.

 

“It is late April and early May when we usually experience our greatest threat of large and destructive fires,” said Lynne Boyd, chief of the DNR Forest Management Division. “Many people don’t realize that most of Michigan’s wildfires occur during the spring and that more than 90 percent of Michigan’s wildfires are human-caused.”

 

“Increased outdoor activity and a forest overflowing with flammable leaves, needles and dead grass is a cause for everyone’s concern each year,” Boyd added. “Combine warm, windy days with more people engaging in activities outdoors and the risk of wildfire swells significantly.”  As in past years, careless debris burning is the source of most wildfires across Michigan. It makes it all the more important to take the time to plan any burning activity before you light a match.

 

Paul Kollmeyer, DNR fire prevention specialist, reminds residents that burning brush legally in the state of

Michigan requires a burn permit. In the Northern Lower

Peninsula and the Upper Peninsula burners can obtain a 

free DNR burn permit online at www.michigan.gov/burnpermit.  Persons without internet access can call toll-free at 866-922-2876. In southern Michigan, burn permits and information on burning can be obtained from local fire departments and township offices.

 

Spring outdoor activities many times include cooking and campfires.   Without proper precaution these fires can escape causing a wildfire.  The following tips can help prevent a fire from escaping:

 

 - Clear away flammable material surrounding the fire so it won’t creep into dry vegetation.

 - Keep campfires small, and do not leave before they are extinguished. 

 - Douse with plenty of water, stir, and add more water until everything is wet; turn over unburned pieces and wet the underside

- Do not just cover a campfire with soil, it may simply smolder before coming back to life.

 - Consider composting or mulching yard debris rather than burning it.

 

“By considering these few simple tips, the public can do its part by exercising great caution when burning brush, leaves or enjoying a campfire this spring,” Kollmeyer said.  For more information on wildfire prevention in Michigan, including information on how to be a “firewise” property owner, visit www.michigan.gov/dnr-fire.

 


Wisconsin

2011 Annual Spring Fish & Wildlife Rule Hearing Results

MADISON – A total of 5,574 people attended the 2011 Spring Fisheries and Wildlife Rules Hearings and Wisconsin Conservation Congress county meetings that were held in every county statewide on Monday, April 11. The hearings provide citizens with an opportunity to comment and provide their input on proposed fish and wildlife rule changes, Conservation Congress advisory questions, and to submit resolutions for rule changes they would like to see in the future.

 

Statewide hearing results and the questions are available on the Spring Rules Hearings page of the DNR Web site. The results will be presented to the state Natural Resources Board in May.

 

Hearing results, along with written comments on proposed rules, and DNR recommendations are used to advise the state Natural Resources Board. This year’s results will be

reviewed at the board’s May 25 meeting in Madison. Votes are non-binding and are presented to the Natural Resources Board to reflect public sentiment on proposed DNR rule changes.

 

DNR fish and wildlife managers will spend the next several weeks analyzing the vote tallies and developing recommendations they will present to the board in May.

The hearings are held in conjunction with the Wisconsin Conservation Congress county meetings. DNR related proposals are presented to attendees by DNR staff. Following DNR business, the meeting is reconvened as a Conservation Congress meeting and congress advisory questions are presented and county congress delegates elected. The congress is an advisory body to the Natural Resources Board. During the congress’ portion of the hearing, citizens may introduce resolutions for consideration and vote by those attending the hearings.

 

2011 STATEWIDE ATTENDANCE 5,574 RESULTS


Walleye bag limits adjusted for Ceded Territory lakes

MADISON -- Daily walleye bag limits have been adjusted on 539 lakes in the Wisconsin Ceded Territory in response to harvest declarations made by six bands of Chippewa in Wisconsin, the state Department of Natural Resources has announced. These bag limits are effective between May 7, 2011 and March 4, 2012, inclusive.

 

There will be a three walleye bag limit for sport anglers on 226 lakes, a two-fish daily bag limit on 311 lakes, and a 1-fish daily bag limit on Potato (Rusk County) and Grindstone (Sawyer County) Lakes.

 

“We strive to work together with the tribes so they can exercise their court-affirmed rights while maintaining recreational opportunities for sport anglers and a healthy, sustainable walleye fishery for future generations of all of our respective constituencies,” said DNR Secretary Cathy Stepp.

 

Most off-reservation Chippewa tribal harvest takes place during the spring spearfishing season. Tribal spearers typically have harvested walleye from 170-180 lakes annually, regardless of the number of lakes initially declared. DNR will review tribal harvest following the spring spearfishing season and may revise bag limits upwards on lakes lightly or not speared. An administrative rule passed by the state Natural Resources Board in 1998 allows the department to adjust initial bag limits to reflect actual spring spearing harvest and projected summer harvests.

 

The adjusted walleye bag limits are available in portable document format on the fishing regulations pages of the DNR website. They will also be posted to the fishing regulations page of the DNR Fishing Wisconsin Web site and are being published as an insert to the 2011-2012 Guide to Wisconsin Hook and Line Fishing Regulations. Lakes not listed are subject to the regulations printed in the regulations pamphlet. Anglers should check the regulations for special size and bag limits that are in effect on specific waters.

 

Of 234 lakes declared by the Lac du Flambeau Band, 224

will have a daily bag limit of three walleye for sport anglers,

while 10 lakes and chains will have a daily bag limit of 2 walleye. Those lakes are: Turtle-Flambeau Flowage (Iron County), Bearskin, Minocqua, and Squirrel Lakes, Willow Flowage, and the Tomahawk Lake Chain (Oneida), and Big St. Germain, Plum, Squaw, and Trout lakes (Vilas)

 

An on-going agreement with the Lac du Flambeau giving the Band authority to sell fishing licenses in return for making declarations at a level that allows a three walleye per day recreational angler bag limit was altered this year to accommodate tribal requests to harvest more fish. The Band declared 10 lakes at the two-bag level.

 

“That negotiated change assured that the thee-bag agreement would be maintained on the majority of lakes the Lac du Flambeau traditionally spear. Further, the band has promised that it would not select any lake for a two bag two years in a row. We believe that on balance, the agreement is good for the northern tourism interests and the tribe,” Stepp said.

 

As part of a 1983 federal Appellate Court decision affirming Chippewa off-reservation hunting, fishing, and gathering rights, the six bands of Wisconsin Chippewa set annual harvest quotas for off-reservation lakes in the Wisconsin Ceded Territory. As part of court agreements, the Department of Natural Resources reduces bag limits for recreational hook and line anglers in lakes declared for harvest by the Chippewa bands to assure the combined tribal and recreational angler harvest does not jeopardize the ability of walleye to sustain its population in any lake.

 

For background information on Chippewa treaty rights, a description of the management and monitoring system used to ensure the long term viability of fisheries in the Ceded Territory, and to see data collected as part of that monitoring system, including walleye population estimates and creel survey summaries for all game fish, see the DNR Bureau of Fisheries Management Internet pages regarding the joint tribal and recreational fishery in the Wisconsin Ceded Territory.

 


Canada

Cabela's plans for Store in Saskatoon, Canada

Construction to begin summer 2011; anticipated opening in spring 2012  

SIDNEY, Neb. - Cabela's announced plans to bring the Cabela's retail experience to customers in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, and the surrounding area.

 

Cabela's expects to open the Saskatoon store in spring of 2012. The 50,000-square-foot store will be located in the Preston Crossing shopping area at the intersection of Circle Drive and Preston Avenue in northeast Saskatoon, near the University of Saskatchewan main campus. This will be the third Cabela's store in Canada, joining locations in Winnipeg, Manitoba, a former S.I.R. Warehouse Sports Store acquired and converted in 2008, and Edmonton, Alberta, to open late this summer.

 

The building's exterior will reflect Cabela's traditional store model with log construction, stonework, wood siding and metal roofing. The inside will highlight the company's next-generation layout, which is designed to immerse customers in the outdoor experience and includes conservation-themed wildlife displays and trophy animal mounts. The store will also feature a Bargain Cave and a

Fudge Shop. Construction is expected to start in July 2011.

 

Celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, Cabela's will open stores in Allen, Texas, and Springfield, Ore., in addition to the Edmonton store. The company has also announced plans to build a store in Wichita, Kan., expected to open in early spring 2012.

 

Showcasing thousands of products, including hunting, fishing, camping, hiking, boating and wildlife-watching gear, as well as outdoor clothing and outdoor-themed gifts and furnishings, Cabela's is famous for its strong brand and world-renowned reputation for delivering quality merchandise, value and legendary customer service.

 

Cabela's, which plans to hire more than 100 people from the Saskatoon area, typically attracts experienced outdoor recreationalists as employees, who join the Cabela's family of employees known for their excellent customer service skills and detailed knowledge of outdoor products.  The Preston Crossing shopping area also includes Walmart, Rona and Canadian Tire stores as anchor tenants.


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