Week of May 23, 2010

Misc New Fishing-Boating Products
Hunting & Shooting Products/Issues
National

Regional

2nd Amendment Issues

Illinois
Indiana
Michigan
New York
Ohio
Wisconsin
Other Breaking News Items

 

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       New Product  Archives

 

Misc New Fishing-Boating Products

Eagle Claw Encourages Anglers to Walk the Bioline

DENVER (May 13, 2011) - Rod and reel anglers of all kinds are connected by a common thread, literally, in that they rely on fishing line as their link between man and fish. Nylon monofilament, ever since first coming on the fishing scene in the mid-1930s, has grown to become the predominant line type of choice because of its affordability, strength and durability.

In fact, monofilament line is so durable that scientists say it can remain in the environment for as long as 600 years. With that said, there's probably not a fisherman out there who hasn't lost a fish or a favorite lure because of having become entangled in old fishing line snags underwater. The reality is that our country's 30 million anglers, age 16 and older, who spend an average of 17 days per year fishing, use a lot of fishing line.

Fortunately, leaders in the recreational fishing industry have always been the ones to keep the environment and tomorrow's anglers in mind, and that is exactly why Eagle Claw Fishing Tackle Co. proudly offers bioline®, a true 100 percent biodegradable premium fishing line that was born from the medical industry. Bioline is engineered to retain its strength and durability for 10-12 months of use, and then completely degrade in water or on land within five years.

"Bioline has all of the performance properties of monofilament - outstanding abrasion and knot strength, and the clarity of fluorocarbon - but is highly more environment friendly," said Chris Russell, Marketing Director at Wright & McGill Co. "Fishermen themselves have always been this sport's greatest advocates for doing the right thing to pass forward the legacy of fishing, and fishermen really 'get it' as to why biodegradable fishing line is a big deal."

Bioline is made from a special formula of biodegradable polymers, resulting in the earth-friendly alternative to nylon because it does breakdown so much faster to become a simple combination of carbon dioxide (CO2), water (H2O) and biomass. The degradation process starts at the surface of the line, with microorganisms breaking down and digesting bioline with the aid of sunlight and moisture.

Bioline begins to lose its tensile strength in 10-12 months of use. As its tensile strength deteriorates, it becomes much less a nuisance to all who enjoy the aquatic environment, including wildlife and anglers.

Of all anglers, crappie fishermen in particular especially benefit from biodegradable fishing line because they spend the majority of their pursuit of the species in and around cover, especially submerged wood. Hardwood brushpiles can provide good crappie habitat for years and years, but the most popular ones can end up a mess through an accumulation of snagged and broken-off lines over time.

"Without a doubt, old fishing line in the water is our number one nuisance in how a lot of us fish for the big slabs here in Mississippi," said crappie guide Bo Hudson of Jackson. "When we're long-line trolling over or near brush with several lines out, it can get ugly in a hurry upon encountering snagged lines down there. Who wouldn't want biodegradable fishing lines to become the standard for our sport?"

 

Mike Taylor, a fishing guide from Okmulgee, Okla., shared similar thoughts. "I have favorite brushpiles I have to avoid with my novice-angling clients because they get hung up so bad on all the previous break-offs down there," he said. "It's a lot easier to get a lure, hook or fish free from a branch or stump than it is from snarled fishing line. I love the thought of my brushpiles being self-cleaning through use of bioline."

Another reason bioline is a natural for crappie anglers is because of available line sizes and filler spool capacities. Bioline comes in 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 lb. test, and each size is sold on a spool containing 225 yards. As a general rule, crappie reels are small and hold less than 100 yards of line, meaning a spool of bioline is good for two or three fill-ups. Bioline retails for around $11.99 per spool.

Bioline packaging is engineered to be air and water tight for use in storing the unused portion in between refills. It is recommended the package be kept in a cool and dry place.

 

"Today's reels perform best with fresh line and their spools filled to the maximum level, so anglers in-the-know are already changing their line on a frequent basis throughout the season," said Russell. "Since we guarantee bioline to retain 100 percent of its strength for the average use of 10 months, this Eagle Claw product is the perfect answer for anglers interested in doing their part for the environment. Bioline is a first-class line and worthy of consideration for any angler and all kinds of fishing."

Eagle Claw got its start in the late 1920s and has always been a leader in innovative, environmentally friendly products that serve the present needs of current anglers while also preserving the planet for future generations to enjoy. In addition to bioline, other "Fish Green®" products in the Eagle Claw lineup include non-lead weights and sinkers, circle hooks, barbless hooks and degradable packaging.

For more information about Eagle Claw bioline, visit

 

 

www.biolinefishing.com

 

www.eagleclaw.com.

 

 


Hunting & Shooting Products/Issues

Taurus new lightweight, large caliber revolvers

The new Taurus 405 and 445 revolvers are aggressive wheel-guns that deliver superior accuracy and stopping power without the heft or bulk of most large caliber revolvers. These 5-shot revolvers are available in blue or matte stainless finish with the Taurus Ribber Grip that reduces felt recoil.

The 445 is chambered in .44 Special and features an Ultra-

Lite® frame that weighs only 22 ounces. The revolver's

barrel measures 2 inches, with an overall length of 7 inches. The 405, Taurus' first .40 S&W revolver, features a lightweight frame that weighs just 29 ounces and includes stellar clips. The revolver's barrel measures 2 inches, with an overall length of 7 inches. Like all Taurus firearms the 405 and 445 come standard with the unique onboard Taurus Security System® that allows users to securely lock the gun using an inconspicuous key-lock.

 

About $452 - $514.
www.taurususa.com


Bushnell Trophy XLT Spotting Scopes

Helps hunters see what they have been missing

The new Trophy XLT spotting scopes from Bushnell offer hunters and outdoor enthusiasts a durable, high quality spotter at an affordable price. 

 

The Trophy XLT spotting scopes are built to withstand the toughest tests from Mother Nature and the demands of the field. Built with a rugged, rubber-armored housing, the spotters are fully waterproof and fog proof. The spotting scope's porro prism design and fully multi-coated optics deliver exceptional clarity and light transmission from sunup to sundown.

 

Each scope includes a quick-detach objective cover, soft-sided case and a compact tripod. In addition, a premium, hard-sided case is included to provide added protection during travel and transport. Two models are available in the Trophy XLT line, a 15-45x 50mm version with an MSRP of $318.95 and a 20-60x 65mm model that is available for $364.95.

These scopes work well with the universal camera adapter, model # 780002CM that sells for $59.95, if you’re using point and shoot digital cameras.   For more information about the Trophy XLT Spotting Scope, visit the product section online

  

About $ 318.95 – 364.95

 

800-423-3537

 

www.Bushnell.com 

 

 


 

National

National Fishing & Boating Week

2011 Free Fishing Days

In the USA, National Fishing and Boating Week is June 4 – 12, 2011. The event is a national celebration of fishing and boating. The event Coincides with most states’ free fishing days, NFBW occurs each year during the first full week of June.

 

Free Fishing Days, offered by many states to coincide with National Fishing & Boating Week in June, are an ideal time to schedule an event that includes fishing and boating activities.

In general, Free Fishing Days allow the public to fish without a

license.

 

Not all states offer free fishing days. Individual states may place certain restrictions and other regulations may apply. For more information, anglers should check with their state fish and wildlife agency directly.

Take Advantage of FREE FISHING DAYS: Most states offer free fishing days (PDF) during National Fishing and Boating Week.


Cooling water intake structures at large power and industrial facilities placing fish at risk

Public comment period ongoing on EPA proposed rules

The 90 day public comment period for the EPA proposed rules on cooling water intake structures (CWIS) at large power and manufacturing facilities is ongoing.

 

The comment period ends July 19, but don’t wait, do it now!!

 

Specifically for the angling community, this affords an opportunity to comment on the proposed fish impingement and entrainment rules/regs/methods for large CWIS. The rules apply to the largest (existing) power plants (over 650) and manufacturing facilities (over 550) nationwide that withdraw water for their operations.

 

The impacts of cooling water withdrawals are characterized as entrainment, where small aquatic organisms are carried by the cooling water into the power plant and killed by heat, and as impingement, where the cooling water intake traps larger organisms against the intake screens. Discharge of cooling water heated to levels significantly above temperatures of the receiving waterbody can also alter aquatic ecosystems.

 

There are hundreds of these facilities across the Great Lakes so the fisheries impacts from CWIS are of critical interest to anglers interested in protecting our fragile and not unlimited fishery and other aquatic resources. The Federal Register

notice can be found at,

www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-04-20/pdf/2011-8033.pdf

 
Submit your comments by one of the following methods:     
 ► www.regulations.gov: Follow the on-line instructions for 
submitting comments,
 ►E-mail: OW-Docket@epa.gov, Attention Docket ID No. 
EPA-HQ- OW-2008-0667,
 ►Mail: Water Docket, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 
Mail Code: 4203M, 1200 
Pennsylvania Ave., NW. Washington, DC 20460. Attention 
Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OW-
2008-0667. Please include a total of 3 copies. In addition, 
please mail a copy of your comments on information collection 
provisions to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, 
Office of Management and Budget (OMB), Attn: Desk Officer 
for EPA, 725 17th St., 
NW, Washington, DC 20503. 
 
For additional technical information, contact Paul Shriner at 
202-566-1076; e-mail: shriner.paul@epa.gov. For additional 
economic information, contact Erik Helm at 202-566-1049; 
e-mail: helm.erik@epa.gov. 
For additional biological information, contact Tom Born at 
202-566-1001; 
e-mail: born.tom@epa.gov.

 

The comment period ends July 19, but don’t wait, do it now!!

 


Urge Congress to support Bill that opens more federal lands to fishing
Increased development and regulations make access more critical than ever

Lack of access is the primary reason that keeps anglers from enjoying a day on the water. With expanding land development and growing regulations restricting angler access, federally owned lands are more important than ever for recreational fishing opportunity. However, a recent Congressional report concluded that more than 35 million acres of land owned by two federal land management agencies – the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service – have inadequate access for sportsmen and women.

 

The Making Public Lands Public Access Act (S. 901), introduced in Congress on May 5, 2011, will increase access to angling, hunting and recreational shooting opportunities on

federal lands. The legislation directs that a minimum of $10 million be used to ensure that fishing, hunting and other

recreational activities are accessible for these purposes. The funding for access projects such as easements and access roads would come from existing Land and Water Conservation Fund monies that come from offshore oil and gas leases.

 

This legislation does not seek to increase the amount of land owned by the government, but instead enhances recreational access in existing national parks, forests and other federally owned lands.

 

The Making Public Lands Public Access Act could open hundreds of thousands of acres of federal land to recreational fishing, hunting and shooting. Follow this link to send a message to your Senators urging them to support S. 901

 


Draft Ballast Water Discharge Standard currently under review

Coast Guard behind schedule on Congressional mandate

The draft Ballast Water Discharge Standard (BWDS) rulemaking package is currently in review.   Once it is submitted to the Office of Management and Budget, OMB will post a summary on its website  

www.reginfo.gov/public/do/eoPackageMain  and conduct an interagency review.

 

The Coast Guard has revised its date for publication, and the rule is expected to publish in summer 2011, rather than the original date of December 2010.

 


Regional

Weekly Great Lakes Water Levels for

May 20, 2011 

WEATHER CONDITIONS

 The Great Lakes basin was cool and cloudy for most of the week, with scattered showers recorded in several locations.  Temperatures fell well below average at the start of the week and have been slowly rising throughout the week.  There is a chance for thunderstorms in the region this weekend, bringing a possible 0.25 to 0.5 inches of rain in some areas.  Temperatures are expected to be near seasonal averages tomorrow and into the weekend.  The Great Lakes basin precipitation to date in May is 91% of average. 

 

LAKE LEVEL CONDITIONS

Currently, Lakes Superior and Michigan-Huron are each 1 inch below their levels of a year ago.  Lakes St. Clair, Erie, and Ontario are 7, 9, and 20 inches higher than their levels of a year ago. Over the next month, Lakes Superior and Michigan-Huron are expected to rise 4 and 3 inches, respectively.  While the water levels of Lakes St. Clair, Erie, and Ontario are predicted to remain steady over the next thirty days. 

 

FORECASTED MONTHLY OUTFLOWS/CHANNEL CONDITIONS

Lake Superior's outflow through the St. Mary's River is projected to be below average for the month of May.  The outflows from Lake Huron into the St. Clair River, and from Lake St. Clair into the Detroit River, are expected to be

below average throughout the month of May. Lake Erie's outflow through the Niagara River is predicted to be above average and the outflow of Lake Ontario into the St. Lawrence River is predicted to be near average.

 

ALERTS

The water level of Lake Superior is below chart datum.  Lake Superior is forecasted to remain below chart datum until July.  Users of the Great Lakes, connecting channels and St. Lawrence River should keep informed of current conditions before undertaking any activities that could be affected by changing water levels.  Mariners should utilize navigation charts and refer to current water level readings.

 

Superior

Mich-Huron

St. Clair

Erie

Ontario

Level for May 20

600.56

577.79

574.77

572.41

246.92

Datum, in ft

601.10

577.50

572.30

569.20

243.30

Diff in inches

-6

+3

+30

+39

+43

Diff last month

+5

+7

+12

+10

+15

Diff from last yr

-1

-1

+7

+9

+20


2nd Amendment Issues

Federal lawsuit takes aim at Illinois’ ban on Concealed Guns

Two private citizens and the Second Amendment Foundation (SAF) have filed a Federal lawsuit challenging Illinois' prohibition of the carrying of firearms for self-defense.

 

Illinois residents Michael Moore of Champaign and Charles Hooks of Percy, along with the SAF, filed the suit on May 12, eight days after a measure that would have allowed residents to carry concealed weapons failed in the State Legislature. Moore is a former corrections officer and Hooks is a farmer, the news provider reported.

 

Illinois and Wisconsin are the only States that ban citizens from carrying concealed firearms for self-defense. However,

SAF Vice President Alan Gottlieb asserted that Wisconsin at least allows its citizens to carry non-concealed weapons.

 

“Only Illinois makes it statutorily impossible for average private citizens to carry firearms for self-defense,” said Gottlieb. “Whether Illinois lawmakers like it or not, the 2nd Amendment right to keep and bear arms is the law of the land.”

 

Gottlieb added that he was surprised that Illinois legislators have not acquiesced to last year’s Supreme Court ruling in McDonald v. Chicago, in which justices ruled that the 2nd Amendment applies to State and local governments.

 


NRA Lawsuit challenges IL Total Ban on Right to Carry

Just one week after the IL House failed to pass legislation to restore the right to keep and bear arms to law-abiding citizens, the nation's largest gun-rights group hit the IL Attorney General's office with both barrels!

 

The NRA is backing a lawsuit on behalf of lead plaintiff Mary Shepard, a church treasurer who was attacked by a 6ft. 245 lb. violent parolee.  Mary Shepard is trained and

licensed to carry a concealed firearm for personal

protection in over 30 states - but not in Illinois, the only state left to completely ban her right to carry.  The Illinois

State Rifle Association joins Ms. Shepard as a plaintiff.  The lawsuit names IL Attorney General Lisa Madigan as one of the key defendants. The NRA is represented by attorneys William Howard and Jeffery Cross of Freeborn & Peters LLP. The lawsuit was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District, Benton Division. To read the text of the lawsuit click here


Illinois

Hunters Bag 15,121 Birds during 2011 Illinois Spring Wild Turkey season
Wettest April on record contributed to lower harvest totals

 SEQ CHAPTER \h \r 1Hunters in Illinois harvested a preliminary statewide total of 15,121 wild turkeys during the 2011 Spring Turkey Season.  The 2011 total compares with the statewide turkey harvest of 16,565 in 2010.  Hunters took a state-record 16,605 turkeys during the spring season in 2006. 

 

Hunters this spring took a preliminary total of 6,469 wild turkeys during all seasons in the South Zone, a decrease from the harvest of 6,916 last year in the south.  The North Zone total of 8,652 wild turkeys compares with last year’s total of 9,649 in the north.  Harvests during the 2006 record year were 6,530 in the south and 10,075 in the north.  All results include harvest during the Youth Turkey Seasons.

 

“This year’s wild turkey season will probably be best remembered for being the wettest April in recorded history,” said Paul Brewer, Illinois Department of Natural

Resources Wild Turkey Project Manager.  “Hunters did

well on days when the weather was cooperative, but those days were few and far between.  We are certainly hopeful for some better weather during the remainder of this spring and into early summer.”

 

In spite of the 93 percent increase in average rainfall statewide, harvest was down only five percent from the previous five-year average.  Flood conditions and weather during the next several weeks will be an important factor affecting nesting success.

 

The 2011 Spring Turkey seasons were April 4-May 5 in the South Zone and April 11-May 12 in the North Zone.  Youth Spring Turkey seasons were March 26-27 in the South Zone and April 2-3 in the North Zone.  The top five counties for turkey harvest in the South Zone this spring were Jefferson (402), Pope (356), Union (324), Randolph (321), and Wayne (314).  The top five counties for spring turkey harvest in the North Zone this year were JoDaviess (534), Pike (522), Fulton (449), Adams (415), and Macoupin (343)

 


Illinois Senate passes Firearm Owners Identification Card FOIA Exemption Bill

Today, the state Senate passed House Bill 3500 by a 42 to 1 vote, with two voting “present” and 14 absent. Sponsored by state Senator Kirk Dillard (R-24) and introduced by state Representative Richard Morthland (R-71), this legislation seeks to incorporate a necessary reform to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) to ensure that the personal information of those who have applied for or received a Firearm Owners Identification Card (FOID) shall not be disclosed unless it is necessary as part of a criminal investigation.

 

HB 3500 passed in the state House on April 8 by a 98 to 12 vote.

 

The FOIA amendments contained in HB 3500 became

necessary following an opinion issued by anti-gun Attorney

General Lisa Madigan in which she stated the Illinois State Police (ISP) must release the personal information of every law-abiding gun owner in Illinois to the Associated Press (AP). Since the mid-1960’s, the ISP has maintained a database with all FOID information, and has considered this material to be confidential and not subject to release. The AP had previously filed a FOIA request for this very information. Enactment of HB 3500 is absolutely essential to protect your rights as a gun owner and ensure that your personal information will stay confidential, and not in the hands of those who have no right to possess it.

 

Illinois is the only state in the Union that requires a FOID card for any Illinois resident wanting to own a firearm.

 

HB 3500 now goes to Governor Pat Quinn for signature


NRA Lawsuit challenges IL Total Ban on Right to Carry

Just one week after the IL House failed to pass legislation to restore the right to keep and bear arms to law-abiding citizens, the nation's largest gun-rights group hit the IL Attorney General's office with both barrels!

 

The NRA is backing a lawsuit on behalf of lead plaintiff Mary Shepard, a church treasurer who was attacked by a 6ft. 245 lb. violent parolee.  Mary Shepard is trained and

licensed to carry a concealed firearm for personal

protection in over 30 states - but not in Illinois, the only state left to completely ban her right to carry.  The Illinois State Rifle Association joins Ms. Shepard as a plaintiff.  The lawsuit names IL Attorney General Lisa Madigan as one of the key defendants. The NRA is represented by attorneys William Howard and Jeffery Cross of Freeborn & Peters LLP. The lawsuit was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District, Benton Division. To read the text of the lawsuit click here


Federal lawsuit takes aim at Illinois’ ban on Concealed Guns

Two private citizens and the Second Amendment Foundation (SAF) have filed a Federal lawsuit challenging Illinois' prohibition of the carrying of firearms for self-defense.

 

Illinois residents Michael Moore of Champaign and Charles Hooks of Percy, along with the SAF, filed the suit on May 12, eight days after a measure that would have allowed residents to carry concealed weapons failed in the State Legislature. Moore is a former corrections officer and Hooks is a farmer, the news provider reported.

 

Illinois and Wisconsin are the only States that ban citizens from carrying concealed firearms for self-defense. However,

SAF Vice President Alan Gottlieb asserted that Wisconsin at least allows its citizens to carry non-concealed weapons.

 

“Only Illinois makes it statutorily impossible for average private citizens to carry firearms for self-defense,” said Gottlieb. “Whether Illinois lawmakers like it or not, the 2nd Amendment right to keep and bear arms is the law of the land.”

 

Gottlieb added that he was surprised that Illinois legislators have not acquiesced to last year’s Supreme Court ruling in McDonald v. Chicago, in which justices ruled that the 2nd Amendment applies to State and local governments.

 


Indiana

Additional trout releases scheduled for area streams

Five northern Indiana streams will be stocked with additional trout before Memorial Day weekend

 

Indiana DNR Fish & Wildlife will stock trout in Pigeon River in Steuben and LaGrange counties, Turkey Creek in LaGrange County, Little Elkhart River in Elkhart County, Little Kankakee River in LaPorte County and Potato Creek in St. Joseph County.  DNR will stock Pigeon River at County Road 175 North and at County Line Road.  Turkey Creek will be stocked at County Road 150 North.  Both stream crossings are located on Pigeon River Fish & Wildlife Area. 

 

The stocking scheduled for the Little Elkhart River will take place at the Bonneyville Mill County Park.  Little Kankakee River will be stocked with additional trout at County Road

100 South.  Potato Creek trout will be stocked within Potato Creek State Park near the paved bicycle trail creek 

crossing.  Parking is available at the West lot.  Anglers targeting these fish will have to hike or bike approximately one mile along the bicycle trail to get to the area but will be rewarded with unrestricted access along a naturally scenic stream.

 

Although these sites will be the only areas to receive additional trout in May, fish from the initial releases in late April are still available in most of northern Indiana’s trout streams, as high water during the opening weekend provided tough fishing conditions. 

 

The DNR practice of making additional stockings at a few sites, which began in 1990, provides a bonus and extends trout fishing opportunities. 

 


Michigan

DNR offers Fishing Workshop for women June

7 & 9

The Michigan DNR is offering a basic fishing workshop designed specifically for women. The workshop – part of the DNR’s Becoming an Outdoors-Woman (BOW) program – will be a two-part workshop on Tuesday, June 7, and Thursday, June 9, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Gander Mountain in Fort Gratiot.

 

Beginning anglers will learn about different types of equipment, how to rig a rod and reel, tie basic knots, choose the right bait, identify fish and find out where to catch them. Registration fee is $10 per person and includes use of all equipment. Participants are asked to register by June 2.

“Spring is an especially great time to learn how to fish,” said BOW program coordinator Sue Tabor. “You’ll have all summer to get out on the water and enjoy beautiful weather and great fishing.”   BOW is a noncompetitive program for women, in which each individual is encouraged to learn at her own pace. The emphasis is on the enjoyment, fun and camaraderie of outdoor activities, and sharing in the success of one another.

 

Gander Mountain is located at 4055 24th Ave. in Fort Gratiot. Space is limited, and early registration is suggested. For more information and registration forms, visit www.michigan.gov/bow. Questions may be directed to 517-241-2225 or dnr-outdoors-woman@michigan.gov.

 


DNR reminds anglers about bait restrictions as bass season opens

Bass season opens statewide on Saturday, May 28, and the DNR is reminding anglers that the use of minnows for bait is restricted in some waters as part of a strategy to slow the spread of viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS).

 

Anglers who purchase minnows for bait should make sure they are certified as VHS-free. Certified disease-free bait is widely available and may be used anywhere for 14 days. The use of uncertified bait is restricted to only those waters that have been detected with VHS. All bait collected by anglers is considered uncertified bait.

VHS is a viral disease that causes fish to die from internal bleeding and has caused mortalities among a number of species of fish in Michigan. The disease has been found inthe Michigan waters of Lakes Erie, Huron and Superior and has been detected in Lake Michigan, though not in Michigan waters.  It has been found in at least two inland lakes – Budd Lake in Clare County and Baseline Lake in Washtenaw County.

 

“There is no known treatment for VHS,” said DNR Fish Production Manager Gary Whelan, who monitors fish diseases for the department. “Our best defense against it is trying to prevent its spread.”


Michigan proposes to lift deer baiting regs

The Natural Resources Commission (NRC) yesterday proposed a regulation change to lift the deer baiting and feeding ban in the Lower Peninsula, which has been in effect since 2008. The proposal is not yet final, and will be voted on at the June 9 NRC meeting in Lansing.

 

The proposal includes the following provisions:

  • Hunters would be able to place two gallons of bait per hunting spot. No more than two gallons of bait could be on the ground at any given time. This is the same regulation currently in place in the Upper Peninsula, and was the regulation in the Lower Peninsula prior to the discovery of Chronic Wasting Disease at a deer breeding facility in Kent County in August 2008. The only exception would be the bovine tuberculosis area in northeast Lower Michigan, where baiting and feeding has been banned for several years.

  • Recreational feeding would return to the Lower Peninsula, except in the bovine tuberculosis area.

  • The proposal directs the DNR to spend $50,000 this year on planting wildlife food plots on state-owned hunting land in the bovine tuberculosis area.

  • The proposal directs the DNR to work with the Legislature to stiffen penalties for baiting violations, including escalating fees, jail time and hunting license revocation. This would be similar to the penalties for violators who snag fish.

It is important to note that this is a proposal, and not final. It could change at the June 9th meeting. Many media outlets around the state are reporting this was already approved by the NRC. It has NOT been approved – it was simply proposed. The commission will vote on it at the June 9th meeting.

 

 


New York

New Black Sea Bass recreational limits for 2011

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) today announced a change effective for the 2011 fishing season for black sea bass that will result in a reduction in recreational harvest. This is a mandatory change to comply with the latest change to the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission’s (ASMFC) Interstate Fishery Management Plan for Black Sea Bass.

 

ASMFC has adopted an addendum to the plan that requires a 40 percent reduction in coast-wide recreational harvest in 2011. This latest reduction was deemed necessary following a report on a survey of last year’s recreational season. Survey results show that recreational anglers greatly exceeded the 2010 allowable harvest limit.

 

For 2011, the Department will adopt the following recreational management measures: a 13-inch minimum size limit, a 10-fish possession limit, and a split open fishing season of June 13 through October 1; then November 1 through December 31. The Department’s Marine Resources Advisory Council, a group composed of citizens representing commercial and recreational fishermen, generally supported these measures as the best available option.

 

Numbers of black sea bass have increased in recent

 

years, which likely triggered the overharvest. Though the

coastal population of black sea bass is considered “rebuilt,” the data used to make that determination is not complete and therefore fishery scientists have urged extreme caution when setting limits for the fishery. New York’s commercial fishermen have seen the sea bass quota reduced over the past two years to the point that there is virtually no longer a viable fishery, while cuts to the recreational fishery have significantly impacted the recreational fishing industry.

 

The text of the new regulation will be published in the State Register on June 8, 2011 and will be available on the DEC website at www.dec.ny.gov/regulations/34113.html.  DEC will be accepting public comments on the new black sea bass regulation through July 25, 2011.

 

Recreational marine fishing regulations can be viewed on the DEC website at www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/7894.html. For additional information, contact DEC’s Marine Resources Division at 631-444-0435. For information on black sea bass management, visit the website of the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission at www.asmfc.org

 

 


DEC warns to avoid eating Carnivorous Snails and Hepatopancreas of Lobsters and Blue Crabs

Announces Emergency Rulemaking to Close Biotoxin Impacted Areas

Due the presence of marine biotoxins, the New York State DEC and Department of Health issued a warning to avoid eating carnivorous gastropods (snails, such as whelks, conchs and moonsnails) and the hepatopancreas (tomalley) of blue claw crabs and lobsters harvested from the following areas: Western Shinnecock Bay (Town of Southampton) and Huntington Bay, Huntington Harbor, Lloyd Harbor, Northport Bay, Northport Harbor, Centerport Harbor and Duck Island Harbor (Town of Huntington).

 

The warning has been issued to protect public health following the detection of saxitoxin in shellfish in certain areas that DEC had previously designated as temporarily uncertified (closed) for the harvest of shellfish (clams, mussels, oysters and scallops).

 

On May 6, DEC designated western Shinnecock Bay (lying west of the Ponquogue Bridge, Hampton Bays, and east of Post Land Bridge, Quogue) as uncertified for commercial and recreational shellfishing. On May 12, DEC designated areas in Northport Bay, Centerport Harbor and Duck Island Harbor as uncertified for shellfishing. On May 18, the department expanded the shellfish closure to include Lloyd Harbor and Huntington Bay (south of a line from Lloyd Neck Point to Eatons Neck Point).

 

Saxitoxin is a potent neurotoxin, or nervous system

poison, that at elevated levels is dangerous to human health. Saxitoxin is known to cause paralytic shellfish

poisoning in humans, which affects the nervous system and can lead to muscles becoming paralyzed. In severe cases, paralytic shellfish poisoning can result in respiratory failure and death. Carnivorous gastropods prey on bivalve shellfish (clams, mussels, oysters and scallops) and can concentrate the marine biotoxins that bivalve shellfish take in through filter feeding.

 

The Department is also filing Emergency Regulations authorizing DEC Commissioner Joe Martens to close commercial and recreational carnivorous gastropod fisheries in areas that have been closed for saxitoxin. Commissioner Martens issued a closure order to suspend the harvest of carnivorous gastropods from the areas currently closed due to saxitoxin, specifically:

 

Town of Southampton: All that area of Shinnecock Bay, and its tributaries, lying westerly of the southbound lanes of the Ponquogue Bridge and easterly of the western (southbound) side of the Post Lane Bridge in Quogue.

 

Town of Huntington: All that area of Northport Bay; Centerport Harbor; Duck Island Harbor; Lloyd Harbor; Coast Guard Cove; and, Huntington Bay lying southerly of a line extending northeasterly from the northernmost point of land at Lloyd Point to the northernmost point of land at Eatons Neck Point.

 

For additional information please visit the DEC website: www.dec.ny.gov/regulations/34113.html


Ohio

Lane Appointed Chief of the ODNR Division of Wildlife

David B. Lane has been appointed chief of the state’s Division of Wildlife by ODNR Director David Mustine. Lane has served as acting District Manager for the division’s District One Wildlife Office in central Ohio since October of 2009. He replaces David M. Graham who retired from the position earlier this year.

 

As chief of the Division of Wildlife, Lane will oversee Ohio's fish and wildlife management programs, as well as management of more than 170,000 acres of state wildlife areas, 2.25 million acres of Lake Erie and 451 miles of the Ohio River.

 

“David’s career reflects a diverse background in conservation and business, as well as experience with law enforcement and proven leadership within the Division,” said Mustine. “He will be an asset helping the division fulfill its core mission as well as strengthening our internal and

external partnerships to promote outdoor recreation opportunities and management of public lands.”

 

A native of West Virginia, Lane was hired by the Division of Wildlife in 2002 as a wildlife officer in Fayette County; he was promoted to Wildlife Officer Supervisor in 2005 and named as acting District One manager in 2009. For 14 years, he worked for Appalachian Timber Services, Inc. in West Virginia. As vice president of the company, he oversaw all aspects of marketing and product development, sales training, established budgets and evaluated financial statements.

 

Lane earned an Associate of Science degree in Forest Technology and a Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration from Glenville State College in West Virginia. In 1987, he earned his Masters of Science in Forestry from West Virginia University.

 

Lane and his family reside in Washington Court House


Ohio Man to pay restitution for poached world class Buck

#200.00 fine, $27,851.33 in restitution

FINDLAY, OH - A Huron County man was found guilty of the illegal harvest of a deer that was taken in November of 2010. Arlie Risner, 58, of Bellevue pled no contest and was found guilty in the Norwalk Municipal Court, according to the Ohio DNR.

Following a tip from a concerned hunter, Huron Wildlife Officer Josh Zientek and Wildlife Investigator Jeff Collingwood investigated the incident and followed the case to its conclusion. Risner had poached the massive deer from a property that he did not have permission to

 

hunt on. The deer scored an incredible 228 6/8.
 

Risner was fined $200.00 and had his hunting rights suspended for one year. Ohio is a member of the Wildlife Violator's Compact with 36 other states. This means that he can not hunt in any of the 36 states in the compact.

 

The Division of Wildlife is imposing restitution for the deer in the amount of $27,851.33. This is in accordance with Ohio's revised restitution law for the illegal taking of wild animals. The law went into effect March 2008 and allows the Ohio Division of Wildlife to seek an increased recovery value on all illegally harvested wildlife.


Ohio Students Excel at National Archery Championships

Maysville Middle School student ties for individual title

COLUMBUS, OH – Thirty-one Ohio teams of 699 student archers competed at the 2011 National Archery in the Schools Program (NASP) National Championship, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Wildlife. The competition was held in Louisville, Kentucky on May 13 and 14; it drew more than 7,000 students from 34 states and Canadian provinces.

 

Logan Hocking Middle School in southeastern Ohio finished third in the middle school division. Maysville Middle School of Zanesville finished fifth in the same division.

Hayden Perry of Maysville Middle School in Zanesville became the third Ohioan to take an individual title at the national competition. Perry finished tied for first in the Middle School Male Division with a score of 294 out of a possible 300.   Ciara Cox of Logan High School placed fourth in the High School Female Division, shooting 290 from a possible 300.

 

The National Archery in the Schools Program brings target archery to the school gym. The curriculum covers archery, safety, equipment, technique, concentration skills, and self-improvement. Kentucky originated NASP in 2002. Ohio has participated in the program since 2004. For more info: ohionasp.com.  For a complete list of results for the 2011 National Archery: archeryintheschools.org.

 


Ohio's 2011 Spring Turkey Season concludes

Ashtabula County again leads the harvest

Hunters checked 18,485 wild turkeys during Ohio's four-week, statewide spring turkey hunting season that ended May 15.

 

The preliminary total represents a 21 percent decrease over last year's harvest number of 23,421 -- the second-highest all-time.  

“I expected to see at least a 10% decline in this year’s spring turkey harvest as a result of the poor hatch in 2009” said Mike Reynolds. “However, the wettest April on record in Ohio hampered turkey hunting and resulted in a lower than expected harvest this season.”

 

Ashtabula County again led the state in the number of turkeys killed with 712. Counties with additional high harvest numbers were: Tuscarawas-583, Knox-513, Adams and Guernsey-507, Harrison-483, Muskingum-462, Coshocton and Highland-447, and Belmont and Monroe-444.

 

Ohio’s game check system preformed as expected this spring turkey season. Only a few minor modifications have been suggested for the fall season, but since the new

automated game check system is built on a web-based

platform making needed modifications to the system can be accomplished. The Division of Wildlife will continue to monitor the game check and licensing systems and make changes as needed for customer convenience.

 

The Division of Wildlife estimates that more than 70,000 people hunted turkeys during the season. Prior to the start of the spring hunting season, state wildlife biologists estimated the wild turkey population in Ohio to be more than 200,000 birds.

 

Wild turkeys were nearly extirpated in Ohio before being reintroduced in the mid-1950s by the Division of Wildlife. The first spring turkey hunting season opened in 1966. Wild turkeys are now present in all 88 counties.

 

Turkey hunters are reminded that hunting licenses purchased now are also valid during the 2011 fall hunting season. Spring turkey permits are good for spring season only. Those participating in the fall turkey season will need to buy a fall turkey permit. The 2011-2012 licenses will not be printed on weatherproof paper. Sportsmen and women should protect their licenses and permits from the elements by carrying them in a protective pouch or wallet.


Wisconsin

Walleye bag limits to increase on 384 northern lakes

MADISON – Daily walleye bag limits will increase May 27 on 384 lakes in the Wisconsin Ceded Territory to reflect spring spearing harvest by six bands of Wisconsin Chippewa.

 

A daily bag limit of two walleye will increase to three walleye per day on 88 lakes while 294 lakes will go from an initial bag limit of two or three walleyes per day to the state daily bag limit of five, according to Joe Hennessy, who coordinates the treaty fisheries management program for the Department of Natural Resources. The daily bag limit in Grindstone Lake (Sawyer County) will be increased from 1 to 2 walleye per day, while the bag limit for walleye in Potato Lake (Rusk County) will be increased from 1 to 3 walleye per day.

 

All of the bag limit increases were made to reflect actual spear harvest through the month of May. Bag limit increases from 2 to 3 walleye per day in Willow Flowage and the Tomahawk Lake Chain (Oneida County), made just before the May 7 regular-season fishing opener, were facilitated by the Lac du Flambeau band revising its harvest target on those lakes.

 

Anglers should consult the 2011-12 Guide to Wisconsin Hook and Line Fishing Regulations, signs at boat landings, and the Revised Ceded Territory Walleye Bag Limits pamphlet for lake-specific information.

 

As part of a 1983 Federal Appellate Court decision affirming Chippewa off-reservation hunting, fishing, and gathering rights, the six bands of Wisconsin Chippewa set annual harvest quotas for off-reservation lakes in the Wisconsin Ceded Territory. To assure the combined tribal and recreational angler harvest does not exceed a sustainable level, the state reduces recreational bag limits in lakes declared for harvest by the Chippewa bands.

 

An administrative rule passed by the state Natural Resources Board in 1998 allows the department to adjust initial bag limits annually to reflect actual spring spearing harvests and projected summer harvests.

 

Of the 245 lakes with bag limits less than five, 70 lakes will have a bag limit of two walleye per day, and 175 lakes will have a daily bag of three walleye per day. The six Chippewa tribes together harvested 28,883 walleye and 199 musky as of May 19, 2011.


Yellow perch season opens May 20 on Green Bay

GREEN BAY -- The yellow perch season opened May 20 on Green Bay and recent surveys suggest that anglers will enjoy improved fishing and greater harvests in 2011 if fishing conditions are favorable, fish biologists say.

 

"We saw several really encouraging signs for the 2011 open water season and beyond," says Tammie Paoli, Department of Natural Resources fisheries biologist for Green Bay. "Harvests were up last year, fish from several year classes are available to the fishery this year, and there was very good survival of fish hatched last year."

 

• Open water harvest of yellow perch in 2010 by sport anglers climbed to 225,995 fish from 204,209 fish in 2009, although the average size harvested was slightly smaller.

• Several year classes and sizes of female perch contributed to the just-ended 2011 spawn, boding well for the fishery this summer and the fish population for years to come.

• The relative abundance of yellow perch hatched in spring 2010 and surviving to fall ranked as the third highest in over 30 years.

The season opens May 20 in Green Bay and tributary rivers and runs through March 15, 2012. There's a daily bag limit of 15 and no minimum length limit.

 

2010-2011 survey results roundup

DNR fish crews conduct several surveys over the year to assess yellow perch populations and keep tabs on harvests. Biologist Tammie Paoli reports these results from the past year.

 

Trawling surveys

Annual late summer trawl surveys continued for the 33rd year to monitor trends in yellow perch abundance. Trawling at 77 index sites at 12 locations from Green Island to Longtail Point indicated that fish hatched earlier and were a half inch larger than recent years due to an earlier than usual spawn last spring. The 2,583 young-of-the-year (YOY) perch caught per hour ranked as the third highest in more than 30 years. The majority were captured near the 

Peshtigo River, Pensaukee River, and Little Tail Point.

 

Other common species in order of abundance captured at shallow sites were white perch YOY, gizzard shad, trout perch, and spottail shiner. Deep water trawls were dominated by round goby, rainbow smelt, and alewife. However, smelt and alewife remain at much lower levels than in the 1980s and 1990s.

 

Sport and commercial harvest

Sport fishing harvest is estimated from an annual creel survey. Anglers reported an increase in harvest in 2010 during the open water season and also during the ice fishing season that ended in March.

 

Ice harvest on Green Bay was 62,829 fish, up from 33,070 in the winter of 2010, and above the 14-year average of 46,359.

 

The annual commercial harvest, reported by commercial fishers who are required to weigh their harvest daily, was up in 2010. Commercial fishers harvested 75,641 pounds using gill and drop nets, compared to 61,509 pounds in 2009. Since 1983 that harvest in Green Bay has been managed under a quota system and has ranged from 20,000 to 475,000 pounds. The current quota has remained at 100,000 pounds since 2008.

 

Spawning assessment

The spring spawning assessment continued for the 34th year as double-ended fyke nets were set on April 18 and monitored until May 2 on Green Bay at Little Tail Point. The peak of the spawn was a week later than normal due to a cold spring. Good news is that several year classes and sizes of female perch are contributing to the 2011 spawn.

 

The survey captured a total of 31 species. Besides yellow perch, trout perch (minnow), spottail shiners, brown bullhead, white suckers, walleye, and round goby dominated the catches. A total of 67 walleye were captured, averaging 23.3 inches.

 


Other Breaking News Items

(Click on title or URL to read full article)

 

Asian Carp issues aired in Muskegon town hall meeting

There may be bigger fish to fry than Asian carp when it comes to invasive species — but that doesn't mean the carp risk can be ignored.  That was the view of many at a Muskegon town-hall meeting Friday on fighting the spread of Asian carp, a catchall term for several non-native species.

 

Lake Erie walleye kill was probably weather-related
The dead walleye that began appearing on Lake Erie several weeks ago are the result of natural forces, and likely not the result of commercial fishermen from Canada or a deadly virus, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources reports.

 

Carp-stopping dam plan killed in Minnesota House committee
A move by the Minnesota House Ways and Means Committee to eliminated funding for a carp-stopping dam at Coon Rapids on the Mississippi River has drawn sharp criticism from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

 

Thousands of Lake Erie Walleye turn up dead

Thousands of walleye are washing up on the western shore of Lake Erie.Wildlife researchers are trying to find out what's causing the massive kill and to determine if it could spread to the other Great Lakes. One expert says the die-off can likely be blamed on natural causes based on the stress of spawning, and the cold, stormy spring.

 

 

The opinions expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the GLSFC, its officers or staff. 

Reproduction of any material by paid-up members of the GLSFC is encouraged but appropriate credit must be given. 

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