Week of August  20, 2012

World
Misc New Fishing-Boating Products
Hunting & Shooting Products/Issues
National

Regional

General

Indiana
Michigan
Minnesota
New York
Ohio
Wisconsin
Other Breaking News Items

 

       Weekly News Archives

                         or

       New Product  Archives

World

International Ice-Fishing Championship slated for Wisconsin Lake

Wausau, Wis. - The United States Freshwater Fishing Federation invited 16 national ice-fishing teams affiliated with the Federation Internationale de la Pesce Sportive (CIPS), the international governing body of competitive fishing, to the 10th annual World Ice Fishing Championship (WIFC X) in Wausau, Wis. The ice-fishing teams hail from Belarus, Bulgaria, Canada, Czech Republic, England, Estonia, Finland, Japan, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Republic of Moldova, Russia, Sweden and Ukraine.

"Munenori Kajiwara, captain of Team Japan, was first to accept the invitation," Mike McNett, US Ice Team captain said. "I know Team Japan is working hard to bring awareness to the plight of their fisheries through the conservation efforts of anglers in light of the tragedy at Fukushima. We applaud Team Japan's willingness to travel so far and welcome them to the WIFC X."

The USF3 and City of Wausau will be hosting the 10th World Ice Fishing Championship at the Big Eau Pleine Reservoir on February 11-17, 2013. The US Ice Team previously won the 2010 World Ice Fishing Championship in Rhinelander, Wis.

The international contingent of anglers will bring some of the most advanced ice fishing techniques, baits and gear to the championship, many rarely seen or even used on American fish.

"Most ice anglers would be stunned to see the specialized rods, reels,

bite indicators, jigs and attractants used to pull fish out of an ice hole,"
McNett explained. "Ice anglers from all levels can learn a lot from attending the competition. I would encourage them to make plans to be in Wausau and study from the best ice anglers in the world."

 

After five days of pre-fishing on the Big Eau Pleine Reservoir, the world ice-fishing championship will determined over two days of ice-fishing over two heats on February 16-17. Teams will draw for their sectors and fish a three-hour heat. The combined weights for each team will determine overall rank and score, with the winning world championship team crowned on February 17. The official weigh-ins will be at the Plaza Hotel, where there will also be a trade show and youth ice-fishing camp each day open for the public.

The USF3 would like to thank the following sponsors that support the US Ice Team's efforts in competing at WIFC X: Shark and American Fishing Contests, Cabela's, HT Enterprises, Humminbird, St. Croix Rods, G2 Gemini Custom Apparel, Kahtoola MICROspikes, Sunline, Marukyu Baits, Power Boots-Sweden and Strike Master Ice Augers.

To contact USA Ice Team Captain Mike McNett, email him at otis_mcnett@hotmail.com or ice@usf3.org. The USF3 is the governing body of international competitive angling for the United State. Its mandate is to promote the sport of fishing among American anglers and to foster the best possible relationship between American anglers and our fellow international angling friends and competitors. Visit www.USF3.org

 


Misc New Fishing-Boating Products

Browning Crossfire Flashlight

Light up the darkness with the new Browning Crossfire Flashlight. This powerful little flashlight has the same power and distance as a flashlight that uses 2-CR123 lithium batteries but uses two standard AA batteries. Housed in a rugged lightweight polymer body and unbreakable LED bulb, the Crossfire Flashlight is ready for any outdoor adventure.

On High setting, the Crossfire Flashlight 125 lumen brightness reaches out to 100 meters and has a run time of 3 hours. The Crossfire will run for 24 hours on low setting and reaches out to 25 meters. The lockout tail cap helps keep the Crossfire from being turned on accidently. The crossfire also has an O-ring seal making it water resistant.

 

About  $31.99

 

800-322-4626      www.browning.com


Hunting & Shooting Products/Issues

Bushnell Up-N-At-Em Blind Seat From Final Approach

Helps Hunters Get On Birds Faster

Final Approach, a reputable leader in the waterfowl industry since 1993 and part of Bushnell family, has introduced a new spring-loaded seat for layout blind hunters. The Up-N-At-Em Blind Seat is lightweight, compact and easy to transport, and helps waterfowl hunters get in shooting position quicker.

 

With a history of innovation in the waterfowl industry, Final Approach is at it again with the  

new Up-N-At-Em Blind Seat. Constructed of rugged, lightweight aluminum and pre-assembled, the spring-loaded seat assists hunters as they sit up to shoot, helping them improve their success rate in the field.

 

The new blind seat fits all Final Approach blinds in the X-2 series and larger, as well as a wide range of layout blinds on the market today. The padded Up-N-At-Em seat offers hunters added comfort in the field and quickly folds flat for easy storage and transport.

 

About $ 129.99

 

800-423-3537   www.fabrand.com


National

Bill Ok’d with Angler and Fishery Provisions

Agreement includes substantial investments in fisheries conservation and management

On July 6, the U.S. Transportation Bill reauthorization was signed into law, which includes several measures of importance to the sportfishing community.

 

The bill, originally set to expire on June 29, included the RESTORE the Gulf Coast Act, which directs 80 % of the Clean Water Act penalties charged to BP as a result of the April 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill to the restoration of the Gulf Coast environment and economy. Without Congressional action, these penalties, which are estimated to be between $5.4 and $21.1 billion, would have gone into the general treasury instead of towards Gulf recovery. The majority of these funds will be distributed to the five Gulf Coast states and the newly established Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council for economic and environmental restoration projects throughout the Gulf of Mexico region, such as wetlands restoration, construction of boat ramps and tourism promotion.

 

Of particular importance to fisheries management, the RESTORE Act also establishes a program that will provide funding for needed fisheries

 

stock assessments and data collection in the Gulf of Mexico.

 

Also reauthorized, but a separate section of the Transportation Bill reauthorizes the Sport Fish Restoration and Boating Trust Fund, commonly known as the Wallop-Breaux Act, which directs $650 million annually to state fish and wildlife agencies' fishing and boating programs. The program had to be authorized as part of the Transportation Bill in order to capture the revenue from that part of the federal fuel tax attributable to motor boat and small engine use. 

 

Funds for this important program are collected largely from the federal manufacturers excise taxes on fishing equipment and the motorboat fuel tax.

 

A third measure included in the bill will expedite efforts to prevent the further spread of the invasive Asian carp, which poses a significant threat to the Great Lakes’ $7 billion sportfishing industry.

 

Together these measures will have a significant impact on fisheries conservation and habitat enhancement in the United States.


Biopesticide to control zebra mussels being tested in Minnesota

USGS testing at Lake Carlos State Park

A research project, using a natural product called Zequanox, is underway at Lake Carlos State Park in an effort to discover an effective and environmentally safe means to control zebra mussels and protect aquatic ecosystems, the Minnesota DNR announced.

 

The DNR's invasive species program is working with the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) and New York State Museum's Field Research Laboratory on the project.

 

Zequanox is a biological product - a biopesticide, safe for native species and is manufactured by Marrone Bio Innovations. The company claims the biopesticide can be used to fight off invasive mussels in enclosed systems and infrastructures. That’s what the state of Minnesota and USGS will attempt to prove with this project.

 

The Great Lakes Sport Fishing Council first reported on the potential benefits Zequanox on February 14, 2011 and again on  March 19, 2012.  (Click on dates to review those articles)

 

Zequanox is a natural product that was approved by the EPA for use in controlling zebra and quagga mussels that attach, colonize and clog closed industrial water systems such as power plant pipes. Most of the early and recent research on Zequanox has been on treatments to control mussels in these closed systems, but little research has been conducted to evaluate its potential for controlling mussels and their veligers in open waters. The research at Lake Carlos is part of a research grant funded by the EPA's Great Lakes Restoration Initiative to assess the safety and

 

efficacy of this product for open water use.

 

"The main objective of this research is to evaluate the potential of Zequanox to reduce the impacts of zebra mussels on native mussels," said Nathan Olson, DNR aquatic invasive species specialist. "In addition, this research is the first step to determine the potential of Zequanox to treat isolated, localized areas such as those around docks and boatlifts in waters where zebra mussels are newly discovered."

 

Last fall, the USGS and DNR placed zebra mussels collected from Lake Carlos into holding cages that were then submerged in different locations in the lake. Over the winter, the zebra mussels attached to aluminum mesh trays within the cages.


Beginning Aug. 15, the mesh trays are being removed from the lake and placed inside a 34-foot research trailer parked on the shores of Lake Carlos within the park. Inside the trailer, the cages are being exposed to Zequanox and then placed back into the lake. After four weeks, a post-treatment evaluation will be conducted to determine the effectiveness of the treatments.

 

Several species of native mussels are threatened or endangered, and zebra mussels do not help with efforts to recover their populations. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service commonly uses cages to propagate native mussels, but zebra mussels attach to the cages and stop water from flowing to the native mussels. The USGS would like to determine if Zequanox can be used as an aid in freshwater mussel propagation.

For more info: http://cida.usgs.gov/glri/projects/invasive_species/zm_control.html.


Keeping Hatcheries open and local Waterways Stocked

Legislation (H.R. 5931) was recently introduced into the U.S. House of Representatives that will address ongoing funding issues that threaten to close federal fish hatcheries within the Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Fish Hatchery System (NFHS).

 

The NFHS is responsible for stocking many of our nation’s waters with the fish, such as rainbow trout, to mitigate for the loss of native fisheries due

 

to water development projects such as dams. With diminishing budgets,

the Service can no longer afford to operate these hatcheries without reimbursement from the responsible water management agencies, including the Army Corps of Engineers, Bureau of Reclamation and Tennessee Valley Authority. H.R. 5931 will require the responsible agencies to pay for their portion of mitigation hatchery operations and keep hatcheries across the U.S. in operation.


 

Number of Hunters & Anglers on the Rise, reversing decades of decline

Federal survey delivers 'Great News for America's Economy

MILWAUKEE, WI - Highlighting the reversal of decades of declining numbers, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar has announced the preliminary results of a comprehensive national survey of outdoor recreation showing a significant increase in hunters and a double-digit increase in anglers over the past five years.

 

"Seeing more people fishing, hunting, and getting outdoors is great news for America's economy and conservation heritage," said Salazar. "Outdoor recreation and tourism are huge economic engines for local communities and the country, so it is vital that we continue to support policies and investments that help Americans get outside, learn to fish, or go hunting. That is why, through President Obama's America's Great Outdoors initiative, we have been focused on helping Americans rediscover the joys of casting a line, passing along family hunting traditions, and protecting the places they love."

 

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's 2011 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation found that hunters nationwide increased by 9 % while anglers grew by 11 %. Nearly 38 % of all Americans participated in wildlife-related recreation in 2011, an increase of 2.6 million participants from the previous survey in 2006. They spent $145 billion on related gear, trips and other purchases, such as licenses, tags and land leasing and ownership, representing 1 percent of the nation's gross domestic product.

 

Other key findings include:

►In 2011, 13.7 million people, 6 % of the U.S. population 16 years old and older, went hunting. They spent $34.0 billion on trips, equipment, licenses, and other items in 2011, an average of $2,484 per hunter.

 

►More than 33 million people 16 and older fished in 2011, spending $41.8

billion on trips, equipment, licenses, and other items, an average of $1,262 per angler.

 

►More than 71 million people engaged in wildlife watching in 2011, spending $55.0 billion on their activities. At the request of state fish and wildlife agencies, the Fish and Wildlife Service has been conducting the national survey every five years since 1955. It is viewed as one of the nation's most important wildlife-related recreation databases and the definitive source of information concerning participation and purchases associated with hunting, fishing and other forms of wildlife-related recreation nationwide.

 

State agencies, hunters and anglers are the key funders of fish and wildlife conservation through their license and gear purchases. An increase in participation and expenditure rates means that agencies can continue to restore and improve habitat and fish and wildlife species, bring more youth into the outdoors and provide even greater access to recreational activities.

 

The U.S. Census Bureau interviewed 48,627 households across the country to obtain samples of sportspersons and wildlife watchers for detailed interviews. Information was collected through computer-assisted telephone and in-person interviews. The Survey is funded through a Multi-State Conservation Grant from the Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program, which celebrates 75 years of conservation success in 2012.

 

The preliminary report is the first in a series that the Service will release. The next report of preliminary findings will contain State data and will be available in the coming months. In late November, the National Report with more detail participation and expenditure estimates will be available online. From December 2012 to May 2013, the 50 State reports will be released on a rolling basis.

 


Regional

Lake Michigan Committee to issue stocking reduction comments August 23

Agreement on final numbers hopefully to be then agreed upon

The Lake Michigan Committee has been working throughout the summer on a stocking strategy for stocking salmon in Lake Michigan. This strategy is based on input from you, the Stakeholders Group, the April workshop and the online survey as well as the Decision Analysis model and plethora of monitoring data on Lake Michigan.  It includes an initial reduction in stocking and a feedback policy to determine when increases

 

and decreases will occur.

 

The strategy development process is on-going and final numbers have not been officially agreed upon. The Lake Michigan Committee will issue a joint news release once the reduction numbers and feedback policy are finalized. Each state will then issue their own press release on how these reductions will be implemented. We hope to have the final numbers shortly after our April 23rd conference call.


Weekly Great Lakes Water Levels for August 17, 2012

WEATHER CONDITIONS

The Lower Great Lakes Basin received significant precipitation early last weekend with the Erie and Ontario basins seeing even more later in the week. The temperatures throughout the Great Lakes Basin were slightly below normal for this time of year.  Throughout the upcoming weekend, there is a chance for some minor precipitation in the form of showers throughout the entire Great Lakes Basin. Expect temperatures to remain relatively cool through the weekend and into next week.  The overall precipitation throughout the Great Lakes Basin is a little bit above average for the month of August. 

LAKE LEVEL CONDITIONS

The water level of Lake Superior is near the same level as one year ago, while Lake Michigan-Huron is 10 inches lower than its level of a year ago.  Lakes St. Clair, Erie, and Ontario are 11, 12, and 10 inches, respectively, lower than their levels of a year ago.  Over the next month, Lake Superior is forecasted to remain near its current level, while Lake Michigan-Huron is expected to fall 1 inch.  The water levels of Lakes St. Clair, Erie and Ontario are forecasted to fall 7, 5, and 3 inches, respectively, over the next thirty days.  See our Daily Levels web page for more water level information.

FORECASTED MONTHLY OUTFLOWS/CHANNEL CONDITIONS

Lake Superior's outflow through the St. Marys River is projected to be below average for the month of August.  Lake Huron's outflow into the St.

Clair River and the outflow from Lake St. Clair into the Detroit River are also expected to be below average throughout the month of August.  Lake Erie's outflow through the Niagara River and the outflow of Lake Ontario into the St. Lawrence River are predicted to be below average in August.

ALERTS

Lake Michigan-Huron is below chart datum.  Users of the Great Lakes, connecting channels and St. Lawrence River should keep informed of current conditions before undertaking any activities that could be affected by changing water levels.  Mariners should utilize navigation charts and refer to current water level readings. 

 

 

Superior

Mich-Huron

St. Clair

Erie

Ontario

Level for Aug 17

601.28

577.36

573.75

571.06

245.01

Datum, in ft

601.10

577.50

572.30

569.20

243.30

Diff in inches

+2

-2

+17

+22

+21

Diff last month

-2

-2

-1

-3

-4

Diff from last yr

0

-10

-11

-12

-10


General

Boaters Use a Checklist before getting Underway

Keeping track of appointments or events has become more complex in a very over scheduled world. A list of reminders added to the calendar on the refrigerator or in the smartphone can help make sure nothing is forgotten. When it comes to leisure time a checklist is still valuable especially when heading out onto the water.

 

Create a pre-underway checklist; It does not have to be complicated; this is just an example of a pre-underway checklist you could use:

  • Driver's license

  • Current registration papers and boating safety course completion card

  • Check fuel supply and oil level

  • Working navigation lights for night operations

  • Enough lifejackets, the right size for all

  • Marine radio, or cell phone

  • GPS

  • Float plan left in your vehicle or with a friend

  • Emergency equipment such as flares, first aid kit, signaling devices and tools

 

If something does not add up it is OK not to get underway. It is always better to choose safety than take a risk with your life or the lives of your passengers.


Field & Stream’s "2012 Best Of The Best" winners

New York, NY August 14, 2012— Field & Stream magazine gave top honors to the best new hunting, shooting, and related outdoor products last week, announcing 25 winners across eleven categories in the magazine’s annual “Best of the Best” roundup.

 

Winning products were battle-tested by the magazine’s expert panels of gear fanatics to ensure they’re up to snuff. Best of the Best Award winners are featured in Field & Stream’s September issue, on newsstands and available at FieldandStream.com/BOTBHunting2012 now.

 

 Ammunition Winners:

  • Alliant Black MZ Powder

  • Federal Mag-Shok Heavyweight Turkey

  • Federal Premium Vital-Shok Trophy Copper

ATV Winners:

  • 2012 Can-Am Outlander XT 1000

  • 2012 Kawasaki Teryx4 750 4x4 EPS LE

Boot winner:

  • Cabela’s Air Revolution by Meindl

Bowhunting Winners:

  • Bowtech Insanity CPX Compound Bow

  • TenPoint Turbo XLT II Crossbow

Clothing Winner:

  • Eddie Bauer Microtherm Featherweight Hunting Jacket

Firearms Winners:

  • Browning Citori 725 Shotgun

  • Ruger American Rifle

  • Taurus Tracker Model 992 Revolver

  • Traditions Vortek Ultralight LDR Muzzleloader

Knives Winners:

  • Buck Haley Heath ErgoHunter Adrenaline Series Avid

  • SOG Bladelight

Miscellaneous Winners:

  • Eddie Bauer Stargazer 2 Tent

  • LaCrosse Swamp Tuff Pro Max-4 Wader

  • Millennium M50 Hang-On Treestand

  • Tenzing TZ2200 Pack 

Optics Winners:

  • EOTech Holographic Hybrid Sight II

  • Meopta Meostar B1 10x42mm HD Binocular

  • Swarovski EL Range 10x42mm Rangefinding Binocular

  • Zeiss Victory HT 2.5-10x50mm Riflescope

Tech Winner:

  • Meopix iScoping Adapter

Truck Winner:

  • 2012 Jeep Wrangler


Cyber attacks double on small businesses

So says 5th annual Verizon 2012 Data Breach Investigations Report

If you think that because you’re a small business, hackers won’t seek your data, consider this: a hacker can steal bank account and/or credit card information from your computer, package it with similar information from a hundred or more other small businesses and sell it on the black market for big bucks.

 

So says the fifth annual Verizon 2012 Data Breach Investigations Report, authored by Verizon Risk Team leader Christopher Porter. The report was produced in conjunction with the U.S. Secret Service and similar agencies from Australia to the Netherlands. Porter recently told PC World magazine: “Small businesses don’t know how defenseless they’ve become, especially to automated and industrialized attack methodologies by organized crime.”

 

According to security software maker Symantec, the percentage of targeted attacks on small businesses doubled in the first six months of this year. The company says it blocked an average of 58 attacks per day aimed at small businesses. Daily attacks on all businesses averaged 154, up 24 percent. Doing the math, it’s apparent hackers are dedicating more resources to what they see as vulnerable targets.

 

The attacks are not random, they’re targeted. It means an attack is tailored for a specific business. Hackers use publicly available information or even information stolen from another company such as a supplier. Basically, the attackers create emails with malicious attachments they believe will trick employees into opening. It’s been dubbed “social

engineering” and it’s sophisticated. So just warning employees about opening emails with attachments isn’t likely to be much protection anymore.

 

It’s notable that of all the attacks the report studied, it found that 96 percent were easy for the hacker to achieve. What’s more, 97 percent could have been foiled without the need for difficult or expensive countermeasures.

 

Therefore, the Verizon report offers some simple recommendations:

• Use a firewall on Internet-facing services. Hackers can’t steal what they can’t reach.

• Change default credentials on any point of sale and other systems that come with preset credentials. This could prevent unauthorized access.

• Monitor third-party vendors if they manage your firewalls or point-of-purchase systems to be sure they have implemented proper security.

• Educate your staff, particularly about social phishing. Establish policies and make sure they’re being followed.

• Follow through on any security technology you purchase to be sure you have configured it properly. Do not ignore reports.

• Think often about security. Check logs of your Windows OS system, point-of-purchase system and security software or have a professional do it for you.

 

Finally, Porter indicated that in most cases, attacks were mostly opportunistic. When a small business follows simple procedures, it is less likely to become a target. Cyber criminals look for the easy marks.


Indiana

Put-and-take pheasant hunt reservation 

DNR will be offering put-and-take hunting for ring-necked pheasants from Nov. 17-25.   These hunts will take place at Atterbury, Glendale, J. E. Roush Lake, Pigeon River (west of S.R. 3), Tri-County, Willow Slough and Winamac fish and wildlife areas.

 

Hunters can reserve put-and-take pheasant hunts online beginning Sept. 1 through Nov. 24 at IndianaOutdoor.IN.gov.  The hunts are $25 per person and the bag limit is two birds.  This is a slight increase from last year’s

prices.  “Our goal has always been to have the put-and-take pheasant program pay for itself,” said Mitch Marcus, chief of wildlife for DNR’s Division of Fish & Wildlife. “The $25 fee allows the division to meet that goal,"

 

Hunters will be able to select the date, property and property location for their hunt.   Pheasant hunting season is extended at Atterbury and Glendale until Jan. 15. The bag limit is two birds of either sex.


Michigan

Governor announces Manistique sea lamprey barrier program

Governor Rick Snyder and Department of Natural Resources Director Keith Creagh today announced the state will become an important partner in a collaborative effort to construct a new sea lamprey barrier in Manistique on the Manistique River.

 

The existing dam, owned by Manistique Papers, Inc., once served as an impediment to migrating sea lampreys and is now more than 100 years old and deteriorating. Sea lampreys now have free access to the entire Manistique River, a huge watershed covering more than 3,600 miles.

 

The new barrier will be constructed by the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers and financed by the Great Lakes Fishery Commission. The Corps requires that a stable, non-federal partner take ownership of the sea lamprey barrier and associated structures. The state will fulfill that role.

 

"Collaboration is key to moving Michigan forward and this local, state and federal partnership is a great example," Governor Snyder said. "Working together, we will help to protect Michigan's precious water resources from the damage caused by invasive species while also assisting the city of Manistique with some of its needs. I appreciate all of the work that the partners have done to find creative solutions to these challenges."

 

Sea lamprey numbers in Lake Michigan have increased dramatically in recent years because of access to the Manistique River system. Each adult sea lamprey consumes more than 40 pounds of fish during its lifetime. The Manistique River now produces the highest number of sea lamprey of any Lake Michigan tributary and is one of the highest producers in the entire Great Lakes basin.

 

"Driven by instinct to reproduce in the streams of the watershed where their larvae grow into ravenous parasites attacking fish species like lake trout, salmon, and whitefish, sea lamprey relentlessly destroy these fish and the economy they support," said Great Lakes Fishery Commission Executive Secretary Dr. Christopher Goddard. "Vision, determination, cooperation, and courage among committed partners are crucial to successful transformation of the deteriorated dam into a new and powerful tool in the ongoing war against sea lamprey."

 

At an estimated cost of nearly $750,000 to treat and kill sea lampreys every two years in the river, this project will produce significant cost savings over time and allow other critical stream treatments to occur for the control of sea lamprey.

 

Sea lampreys and other invasive species remain a serious threat to the ecology of the Great Lakes and to local economies, said DNR Director Creagh. This partnership marks a significant step forward in addressing one piece of that problem and does so in a way that benefits the local community and the state. I couldnt be more pleased.

 

In addition to Great Lakes fishery benefits, this project will also replace an aging water line critical to the City of Manistique and upgrade the citys flood control wall.

 

Manistique Papers, Inc. will also benefit from this work by having much of the aging dam and associated infrastructure removed, thus providing benefits to the companys operations.

 

 


EHD confirmed in eight Michigan counties

Barry, Branch, Calhoun, Cass, Clinton, Eaton, Ionia and Montcalm

 The Michigan DNR and Michigan State University Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health recently confirmed and announced the death of deer in Ionia and Branch counties was due to epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD). Today the two organizations have confirmed EHD in six additional counties: Barry, Calhoun, Cass, Clinton, Eaton and Montcalm. There has been a nationwide increase of EHD outbreaks due to the extended hot and dry conditions.

 

The often-fatal viral disease, found in wild ruminants, causes extensive internal bleeding within deer and is transmitted by a midge, or type of biting fly. A constant characteristic of the disease is its sudden onset. Deer lose their appetite and fear of humans, grow progressively weaker, salivate excessively and finally become unconscious. Due to a high fever, infected deer often are found sick or dead along or in bodies of water. There is no evidence that humans can contract the EHD virus.

 

EHD outbreaks killing deer in Michigan have occurred in isolated areas almost every year since 2006. Prior to 2006, EHD outbreaks in Michigan occurred in 1955 and 1974. The estimated mortality has varied from 50 to 1,000 deer per year in the affected areas.

 

“We are seeing a large die-off of deer in local areas. To date we have over 900 reports of dead deer across all counties,” stated Tom Cooley, DNR wildlife biologist and pathologist. “Although it is difficult to see so many

dead deer, this is still a localized issue and the regional deer population

should not be impacted.”

 

The DNR would like to remind hunters that they may not see as many deer in the areas where EHD is occurring. Deer numbers in the affected areas should rebound within a few years.

 

There is no known effective treatment for, or control of, EHD. Where EHD is more common, deer have built up antibodies to the disease, and population recovery does not take long. Michigan deer do not have the benefit of these antibodies. Losses may be severe but are typically restricted to localized areas. Population recovery may take longer than has been experienced in other states.

 

Property owners who discover dead deer or would like to talk to their local wildlife biologist should contact their nearest DNR office. Office locations can be found at www.michigan.gov/wildlife by clicking on Wildlife Offices.

 

It is acceptable to allow natural deterioration processes to dispose of deer that die from EHD. Natural deterioration will not spread the disease or cause other disease outbreaks. Property owners are responsible for the proper disposal of carcasses that they wish to remove from the site. Carcasses should be buried at a sufficient depth so that no parts are showing above ground. Carcasses also can be disposed of at landfills that accept household solid waste.

For more information on EHD, visit www.michigan.gov/wildlifedisease.


Minnesota

Public invited to comment on experimental fishing regulations
Reviews of existing or newly proposed fishing regulations will be the subject of seven public meetings conducted across the state in the coming weeks by the Minnesota DNR.   The meetings will focus on 14 lakes and relate to regulations for sunfish, crappie, largemouth bass, northern pike, yellow perch, trout and walleye

Notable among these are reviews of walleye regulations on Namakan Reservoir lakes; northern pike regulations on Big Swan Lake in Todd County; trout regulations on Square Lake in Washington County and regulations on multiple species on four lakes in Otter Tail County. Also being discussed is a proposal for new regulations for multiple species on Lake La Salle, located within a new State Recreation Area in Hubbard County.

The goal of experimental and special regulations on individual waters is to expand opportunities for anglers to experience quality fishing that can be sustained in light of increasing angling pressure and improved angler efficiency. During the past 25 years, fisheries managers have monitored a variety of regulations across Minnesota.

“Much has been learned from our efforts to improve fish populations with length and bag limits,” said Al Stevens, DNR fisheries program consultant. “If experimental regulations are successful, then regulations can be replicated on similar waters where fisheries managers and anglers agree they would help improve or maintain quality fishing.”

Experimental regulations are in effect for a specific period of time, typically 10 years. Before the regulation ends, fish managers must evaluate the regulation and then gather input from public meetings to help determine whether to extend, modify or drop the existing experimental regulations.

“Fisheries managers welcome the opportunity to hear opinions from anglers,” Stevens said. “Public participation is critical in determining whether proposed and existing regulations are meeting angler expectations.”   

Waters being evaluated this year were posted at public access points this past spring. Public notices for each meeting will be published in local newspapers. For more information about a specific meeting, check online at www.mndnr.gov/fishing/meetings or contact your local DNR Fisheries offices.

Written or verbal comments also will be accepted at local fisheries offices up to 10 days following a local meeting. Telephone numbers and addresses of local fisheries offices can be found online at online at www.mndnr.gov/areas/fisheries or on page 86 of the 2012 Fishing Regulations.

For those unable to attend a local meeting, an open house will be held at the St. Paul DNR Headquarters, 500 Lafayette Road, on Wednesday, Sept. 26, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. No formal presentations will be made but fisheries staff will be available to take comments on any proposal. Comments will be accepted through Monday, Oct. 8, and also may be submitted by email to al.stevens@state.mn.us or by calling 651-259-5239
.
 

Open houses are scheduled for:

Sept 5 - Big and Little Pine (review exiting regulation on walleye), 7 to 9 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 5, at the Perham Community Center, 620 Third Ave., Perham

 

Sept 6 - Otter Tail County: Annie Battle (review exiting regulation sunfish, crappie, largemouth bass, northern pike; and restrictions on use of electronics and motors). North and South Ten Mile (review existing regulation on bass). Norway (review existing regulation on panfish, largemouth bass, walleye, 7 to 9 p.m. on Thursday, Sept 6, at the DNR office, 1509 First Ave., in Fergus Falls.

 

Sept 13 -Hubbard County:  Lake La Salle (review new proposal for bass, panfish, walleye). 7 to 9 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 13, at Fern Township Hall, which is three-fourths mile west of Becida on Hubbard County Road 9 near Becida.

 

Sept 18 -Todd County: Big Swan Lake (review existing regulation on northern pike), 6 to 9 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 18, at Bruno’s Hub Supper Club, 13905 Todd County Road 13, in Bertrum.

 

Sept 20 - Washington County: Square Lake (review existing regulation on trout and trout stocking),  6 to 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 20, Washington County Government Center, Lower Level Room #113, 14949 62nd St. N., Stillwater.

 

Sept 25 - St. Louis County: Kabetogama, Namakan, Sand Point, Crane and Little Vermilion (review existing regulation on walleye), 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 25, Kabetogama Community Hall on St. Louis County Road 122 near Kabetogama.


Input sought on Namakan Reservoir walleye regulations
Walleye regulations on lakes in the Namakan Reservoir will be discussed at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 25, at the Kabetogama Community Hall on St. Louis County Road 122.

 

Minnesota DNR fisheries staff will provide background information, answer questions and take public input on the future of experimental regulations on Kabetogama, Namakan, Sand Point, Crane and Little Vermilion lakes in northern St. Louis County.

 

The current experimental regulation for walleye, in place since 2007, requires the immediate release of all walleye from 17 to 28". One walleye more than 28 inches is allowed in a possession limit of four walleye. The possession limit for walleye and sauger combined is six.

These regulations expire on March 1, 2013. Input at the meeting will help determine if they are modified, extended or dropped to achieve fish management objectives.

 

People unable to attend the public input meeting may submit comments to the DNR Area Fisheries Office, 392 Highway 11 East, International Falls, MN 56649; by phone at 218-286-5220; or via email to kevin.peterson@state.mn.us . All comments must be received by Oct. 8.

 

Comments will also be accepted at an open house at the DNR Central Office, 500 Lafayette Rd, St. Paul, on Wednesday, Sept. 26, 8 - 4:30 pm.

 

 


Trout regulation change proposed for Square Lake Sept. 20
The Minnesota DNR East Metro Fisheries Office will conduct a public open house to discuss and take comments on its proposal to modify fishing regulations on Square Lake in Washington County. The meeting will take place Thursday, Sept. 20, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. in lower level Room 13 of the Washington County Government Center, 14949 62nd St. N., in Stillwater.

 

DNR is proposing to drop special regulations that limit trout angling on Square Lake to catch-and-release only during the first four weeks of the open water season and during the month of October, as well as dropping a two-fish bag limit. The special regulation was aimed at extending the period of time during which trout stocked in the lake would be available for harvest, but it has been only minimally successful. Dropping the special

regulation would return Square Lake to statewide trout angling rules.

 

In addition to discussing the proposed regulation change, the DNR will present information on a request from the Carnelian-Marine-St. Croix Watershed District that trout stocking in Square Lake be suspended for three years to conduct studies on the relation between trout and water quality. The district and some others have expressed concerns that the stocking of trout in Square Lake may be contributing to a decline in water clarity.

Those unable to attend the meeting may direct written comments until Sunday, Sept. 30, to DNR East Metro Fisheries, 1200 Warner Road, St. Paul, MN, 55106. Comments also may be delivered by email to Gerald.J.Johnson@state.mn.us, or by calling 651-259-5831


New York

Be a Mentor to a new angler, hunter or trapper

Adult hunters and trappers are encouraged to pass along their traditions and become a mentor for a junior hunter or trapper. The junior hunter and trapper mentoring program allows 14 and 15 year olds to hunt big game with a firearm and 12 to 15 year olds to hunt big game with a bow while accompanied and supervised by an experienced adult hunter. Unlicensed youth less than 12 years of age may also accompany and assist a licensed and experienced adult trapper. More details about these opportunities are available in this year's Hunting and Trapping Laws and Regulations Guide or Junior Hunter Mentoring Program webpage at http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/46245.html.

 

Due to pending legislation, it is unknown if the youth hunt (firearms) for deer, tentatively scheduled over Columbus Day weekend, will occur. If legislation is passed for the youth hunt, DEC will publicize this via news release and on the website.

 

Anglers are encouraged to "Take the Pledge" and help grow the sport of fishing in New York by taking someone new fishing this year. More than 11,000 New York anglers have participated in this joint program of the Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation and the DEC since its inception in 2006. Anglers interested in Taking the Pledge can do so on DEC’s fishing page at http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/fishing.html.

 

The I FISH NY Guide to Freshwater Fishing in New York features a map/brochure and provides information on over 320 lakes and ponds and 110 rivers and streams recommended by DEC Fisheries staff.  The map can be requested by contacting fwfish@gw.dec.state.ny.us (NY FISHING MAP in the subject line).  New for 2012 are the interactive maps of public fishing waters and boat launch sites which can be found at www.dec.ny.gov/pubs/42978.html.  Additional fishing information can be found at www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/7832.html.


Contribute Via Habitat Stamps or donation to support conservation programs

DEC encourages all outdoor enthusiasts to consider purchasing a Habitat/Access Stamp and/or a Trail Supporter Patch. These stamps and patches help support DEC's efforts to conserve habitat and increase public access for fish and wildlife-related recreation and maintain non-motorized trails. Buying a $5 stamp or patch or donating directly to the Conservation Fund is a way to help conserve New York's fabulous wildlife heritage and enhance outdoor recreation in New York State. Additionally, anyone - not just hunters and anglers - can help feed the hungry by contributing to the Venison Donation Program at all license issuing outlets. Individuals should inform the license sales agent that they want to make a donation of $1 or more to support the program. Since 1999, the Venison Donation Coalition has paid for the processing of more than 330 tons of highly nutritious venison, the equivalent of 2.8 million meals

served. For more information about the program, go to www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/8351.html.

 

Participate in Citizen Science to benefit wildlife management

Each year, thousands of hunters, trappers and anglers help DEC monitor wildlife populations by recording their wildlife observations while afield. To learn about how you can participate in the Cooperator Ruffed Grouse Hunting Log, Bowhunter Sighting Log, Winter Wild Turkey Flock Survey and other citizen science programs, please see Citizen Science: Wildlife Observation Data Collection www.dec.ny.gov/animals/1155.html.

 

The latest updates on New York's fish and wildlife can be easily accessed on the Fish, Wildlife and Marine Resources E-mail News www.dec.ny.gov/about/63801.html, a free online e-mail list.


Ohio

Squirrel Season Offers Hunters Preparation for Fall Hunting

Season begins Sept. 1 and runs through Jan. 31

COLUMBUS, OH- Ohio's squirrel season will open on Sept. 1 and provide hunters with an opportunity to take as many as six squirrels each day, according to the Ohio DNR.

 

Ohio's squirrel season, a long-time tradition for many hunters, offers ample hunting opportunities for fox and gray squirrels across the state. This is an excellent time to take a youth hunting or scout for the upcoming deer and fall wild turkey hunting seasons. Legal hunting hours are one-half hour before sunrise to sunset daily.

 

Squirrel season will be closed during the one-week statewide deer gun season, Nov. 26-Dec. 2.

 

The abundance of nut crops is a good indicator of squirrel numbers the following year. Statewide nut production ratings for fall 2011 were lower in comparison to those from 2010. However, the predicted squirrel hunting outlook for the 2012-13 season is again above average. Although oak

 

production was average, substantial increases in walnut production occurred throughout the state during fall 2011.

 

Increased food supply in concert with a mild winter should lead to high squirrel densities and increased hunting opportunities this fall.

Primary fox squirrel range occurs predominately in the agricultural landscapes in the northeastern and western regions of Ohio, whereas the primary gray squirrel range is in the extensively forested east-central, southeastern and south-central regions. Gray squirrels are more dependent on hard mast, and their abundance is closely tied to the mast crop the previous fall. Fox squirrels are less dependent upon mast crop resources and likely use supplemental food in agricultural areas.  

 

Hunters who wish to participate in the Squirrel Hunting Diary Program, designed to track trends in nut crops and squirrel populations across the Buckeye State, should contact the Waterloo Wildlife Research Station, 360 East State St., Athens, Ohio 45701, at 740-589-9930 for more information.


Wildlife Council OK’s 2012-13 waterfowl season

Daily bag limit for geese will be raised to three

COLUMBUS, OH - The 2012-13 waterfowl hunting season dates have been approved by the Ohio Wildlife Council, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources’ (ODNR) Division of Wildlife.

 

The Lake Erie Marsh Zone encompasses portions of Lucas, Wood, Ottawa, Sandusky and Erie counties. The duck hunting season in the Lake Erie Marsh Zone is Oct. 13-28 followed by a second segment that opens Nov. 10-Dec. 23.

 

The duck hunting season in the North Zone is Oct. 13-28, followed by a second segment that opens Nov. 24 and runs through Jan. 6, 2013. In the South Zone, duck season is open Oct. 20-28, followed by a second segment that opens Dec. 8 and runs through Jan. 27, 2013.

 

The daily bag limit for ducks is six, which may not include more than four mallards (no more than one may be female), three wood ducks, one black duck, two redheads, four scaup, one canvasback, two pintails and one mottled duck. The daily bag limit for mergansers is five of which no more than two may be hooded mergansers. The daily bag limit for coots is 15. Possession limits after the first day are twice the daily bag limit.

 

In the Lake Erie Canada Goose Zone, the goose season is Oct. 13-28 followed by a second segment that opens Nov. 10 and runs through Jan. 10, 2013. The goose season for the remainder of the North Zone is Oct. 13-28, with a second segment that runs from Nov. 24 through Jan. 6, 2013, and a third segment from Jan. 12-29, 2013. In the South Zone, goose season is Oct. 20-Nov. 11 followed by a second segment that opens Dec. 8 and runs through Jan. 31, 2013.

 

The daily bag limit for Canada geese is three, raised from two. Light

geese (snows, Ross’ and blues) have a daily bag limit of 10, white-fronted

geese have a daily bag limit of one and brant have a daily bag limit of one. The possession limit for brant and geese is twice the daily bag limit after the first day.

 

Hunters 15 years of age and younger will have the opportunity to enjoy special statewide youth waterfowl seasons. Young hunters in the Lake Erie Marsh Zone and North Zone can hunt Sept. 29-30. The dates for South Zone youth hunters are Nov. 23-24.

 

Licensed falconers can hunt ducks, geese, mergansers and coots statewide from Feb. 8, 2013, through March 10, 2013, in the Lake Erie Marsh, North and South Zones whenever those zones are open to duck hunting.

 

Harvest Information Program (HIP) certification is required of all waterfowl hunters prior to hunting. Migratory game bird hunters must call 877-HIPOHIO (447-6446) and answer a few survey questions to complete the HIP certification requirement. Once the survey has been completed, hunters will be provided a certification number to write on their Ohio hunting license.

 

Waterfowl hunters age 18 and older will also need a state wetland habitat stamp which may be purchased at any hunting license agent or at wildohio.com. In addition, all waterfowl hunters age 16 and older must possess a signed federal duck stamp which can be purchased at most post offices.

 

Copies of this season's waterfowl hunting regulations, which include maps of the zones (Publication 5295, Waterfowl Hunting Seasons), will be available online at wildohio.com or available at all license agent outlets by late September.


Wisconsin

International Ice-Fishing Championship slated for Wisconsin Lake

Wausau, Wis. - The United States Freshwater Fishing Federation invited 16 national ice-fishing teams affiliated with the Federation Internationale de la Pesce Sportive (CIPS), the international governing body of competitive fishing, to the 10th annual World Ice Fishing Championship (WIFC X) in Wausau, Wis. The ice-fishing teams hail from Belarus, Bulgaria, Canada, Czech Republic, England, Estonia, Finland, Japan, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Republic of Moldova, Russia, Sweden and Ukraine.

"Munenori Kajiwara, captain of Team Japan, was first to accept the invitation," Mike McNett, US Ice Team captain said. "I know Team Japan is working hard to bring awareness to the plight of their fisheries through the conservation efforts of anglers in light of the tragedy at Fukushima. We applaud Team Japan's willingness to travel so far and welcome them to the WIFC X."

The USF3 and City of Wausau will be hosting the 10th World Ice Fishing Championship at the Big Eau Pleine Reservoir on February 11-17, 2013. The US Ice Team previously won the 2010 World Ice Fishing Championship in Rhinelander, Wis.

The international contingent of anglers will bring some of the most advanced ice fishing techniques, baits and gear to the championship, many rarely seen or even used on American fish.

"Most ice anglers would be stunned to see the specialized rods, reels,

 

bite indicators, jigs and attractants used to pull fish out of an ice hole," McNett explained. "Ice anglers from all levels can learn a lot from attending the competition. I would encourage them to make plans to be in Wausau and study from the best ice anglers in the world."
 

After five days of pre-fishing on the Big Eau Pleine Reservoir, the world ice-fishing championship will determined over two days of ice-fishing over two heats on February 16-17. Teams will draw for their sectors and fish a three-hour heat. The combined weights for each team will determine overall rank and score, with the winning world championship team crowned on February 17. The official weigh-ins will be at the Plaza Hotel, where there will also be a trade show and youth ice-fishing camp each day open for the public.

The USF3 would like to thank the following sponsors that support the US Ice Team's efforts in competing at WIFC X: Shark and American Fishing Contests, Cabela's, HT Enterprises, Humminbird, St. Croix Rods, G2 Gemini Custom Apparel, Kahtoola MICROspikes, Sunline, Marukyu Baits, Power Boots-Sweden and Strike Master Ice Augers.

To contact USA Ice Team Captain Mike McNett, email him at otis_mcnett@hotmail.com or ice@usf3.org. The USF3 is the governing body of international competitive angling for the United State. Its mandate is to promote the sport of fishing among American anglers and to foster the best possible relationship between American anglers and our fellow international angling friends and competitors. Visit www.USF3.org

 


EPA O.K.’s $50 Million for projects on Sheboygan River AOC

Procedure would ultimately remove River from Great Lakes Cleanup List
(Sheboygan – Aug. 15, 2010) The USEPA and Sheboygan area officials joined forces last week to kick off the final dredging work and habitat restoration projects needed to remove the Sheboygan River "Area of Concern" from a list of toxic hot spots identified in the 1987 Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.   EPA has targeted up to $57 million for work in the Sheboygan River AOC, which is on Lake Michigan.   The State of Wisconsin, the City of Sheboygan and Sheboygan County are contributing $5 million to the final phase of the clean up.

"By the end of the year, we will complete all of the work needed to ‘delist’ the Sheboygan River AOC,” said Susan Hedman, U.S. EPA Region 5 Administrator and Great Lakes National Program Manager. “Thanks to the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative and our dedicated local, state and federal partners, we are finally getting the most contaminated sites on the Great Lakes cleaned up."

The Sheboygan River is one of 39 remaining AOCs on the Great Lakes. Since the United States and Canada identified the list of AOCs in 1987, only one on the U.S. side has been "delisted." The Sheboygan River is one of four AOCs that EPA has targeted to complete cleanup work in 2012. Five more AOCs are targeted for completion in 2013 and 2014.

“After almost 30 years, having the Sheboygan River cleaner and deeper will add significant benefits both recreationally and financially to our local economy that already provides almost a $9 million waterfront economic  

impact,” said Mayor Terry Van Akkeren.
 

One EPA dredging project will remove contaminated sediment from the river between Kiwanis Park and the 8th Street Bridge. The other project with remove contaminated sediment from the bridge to the mouth of the river on Lake Michigan. Three EPA-funded habitat projects will begin this month to restore the shorelines at Kiwanis Park, on Wildwood Island, and near the intersection of Taylor Drive and Indiana Avenue.

“After nearly three decades of being a black eye of the community, we are thrilled that the Sheboygan River and Harbor is being restored to reduce health risks to people, fish and wildlife, and will greatly enhance opportunities for economic development,” said Adam Payne, Sheboygan County Administrator. “Sheboygan County is grateful for the opportunity to partner with the EPA, DNR, City of Sheboygan and many other public and private stakeholders to leverage the necessary resources to finally clean up and dredge the Sheboygan River and Harbor. I’m proud to be a part of the team, and our collective efforts will bear fruit for generations to come.”  

In February 2009, President Obama proposed the GLRI, the largest investment in the Great Lakes in two decades. GLRI funds are being used to accelerate cleanup work in the remaining AOCs identified by the U.S. and Canada in the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement during the 1980s.

For more information: www.epa.gov/greatlakes /aoc/sheboygan/


Other Breaking News Items

(Click on title or URL to read full article)

 

Longest ship on Great Lakes free again
Salvage crews were able to re-float the stranded Paul R. Tregurtha, which had been blocking the downbound shipping channel of the St. Marys River near Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., since Wednesday morning

 

Proposal would cut salmon stocking in Wisconsin by 38%
The Department of Natural Resources' tentative plan to reduce the number of salmon stocked in Lake Michigan calls for a 50% decrease in Chinook salmon stocking, including a 37.8% decrease in Wisconsin

 

Michigan to take ownership of lamprey barrier)
The state of Michigan is taking ownership of a new barrier on the Manistique River in the Upper Peninsula designed to block the path of parasitic sea lampreys.

 

Radar study could help predict dangerous Great Lakes currents
A new Great Lakes study using radar could save swimmers’ lives by enabling the prediction of dangerous currents before they form.

 

River invasion: It's time to thwart the Asian carp in the Ohio
Pennsylvania and its lake-state neighbors have been pushing the federal government for help in keeping the invasive Asian carp out of the Great Lakes. It's time for Pennsylvania and its river-state neighbors to demand the same for the Ohio River system.

Pelicans spotted on lake
)
Large, white pelicans have been spotted on Lake St. Clair.

 

Lake Michigan water temperatures crash 30 degrees during weekend cool down
Lake Michigan water temperatures have fallen as much as 30 degrees during the past weekend.

Windsor student’s discovery may help rid Great Lakes of invasive lampreys
A recent discovery by Warren Green, a University of Windsor Ph.D. student, may help Lake Huron get rid of invasive eel-like sea lampreys.

 

Tentative plan announced for Lake Michigan stocking cuts
The largest cuts are planned for Michigan because chinook are naturally reproducing in that state's tributaries to Lake Michigan. Fisheries managers estimate about half the lake's chinook are wild, naturally reproduced fish hatched in Michigan streams or migrants from Lake Huron.

 

 

The opinions expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the GLSFC, its officers or staff. 

Reproduction of any material by paid-up members of the GLSFC is encouraged but appropriate credit must be given. 

Reproduction by others without written permission is prohibited.

arrowUSFWS Press Releases  arrowSea Grant News

State Fish Pages

Illinois - Indiana - Michigan - Minnesota - Ohio - Pennsylvania - New York - Wisconsin - Ontario

 

Home | Great Lakes States | Membership | Exotics Update | Great Links

Pending Issues | Regional News | Great Lakes Basin Report | Weekly News / Archives