Week of August 30, 2010

Memorable quote
  • The cause of America is in a great measure the cause of all mankind

    ..Thomas Paine

 
Hunting & Shooting Products/Issues
Regional

Illinois
Indiana
Michigan
Minnesota
Pennsylvania
Wisconsin
Other Breaking News Items

 

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Hunting & Shooting Products/Issues

Ruger Introduces the Ruger SR-556/6.8 Piston-Driven Rifle

Sturm, Ruger & Co., Inc. (NYSE:RGR) is pleased to announce the new Ruger® SR-556/6.8, a new chambering in the popular SR-556 two-stage, piston-driven, AR-Style rifle. The new SR-556/6.8 brings the power and downrange authority of the 6.8 SPC cartridge in a two-stage piston rifle that runs cooler and cleaner than traditional gas-driven, AR-style rifles

 

Packaged with one five-round magazine and two twenty-five round magazines, the SR-556/6.8 is an ideal hunting rifle for those who appreciate the versatility of the customizable and ergonomic AR-style platform. The 6.8 SPC has ample power for hunting medium-sized game, and the greater muzzle and downrange energy enhances the capability of the SR-556 in defensive or tactical roles as well.

 

The SR-556/6.8 retains all the features of the original SR-556® that make it an outstanding value in the AR-style rifles.

 

The patent-pending, two-stage piston delivers a smooth

power stroke to the one-piece bolt carrier, which softens recoil, aiding both shooter comfort and durability of the rifle. The four-position gas regulator allows the shooter to tune the rifle to the ammunition being fired and environmental conditions present. A chrome-lined, cold hammer forged barrel provides accuracy and longevity, Troy Industries Folding BattlesightsTM, Quad Rail and rail covers add considerable value to the package, as does the Hogue® Monogrip®, six-position stock, sight adjustment tool, and the padded carry case, all included with the SR-556/6.8.

 

The SR-556/6.8 maintains the mid-length gas system and the heavy (.850") barrel contour under the handguard of the original SR-556. The 1:10 twist barrel has a standard SAAMI 6.8 SPC chambering, is 16.12" long, is threaded 5/8-24, and is capped with the effective and distinctive Mini-14/SR-556 flash suppressor. The SR-556/6.8 weights 7.75 pounds without a magazine.

 

About $1995.00


New Simmons LRF600 Laser Rangefinder

Offers Accurate Ranging and Simple Operation

Simmons Optics, a leader in high-quality, value-priced riflescopes and binoculars, has introduced a new laser rangefinder.

 

The new LRF600 Laser Rangefinder offers accurate ranging performance from 10-600 yards. The optics feature 4x magnification for quick target acquisition and the in-view liquid crystal display gives a clear sight picture for an accurate distance reading. The unit has one button operation for ease of use.

The LRF600 has a sleek vertical profile with a stylish design. The unit operates on one 9-volt alkaline battery.

 

Consumers have until December 31st, 2010 to help Simmons celebrate their 25th anniversary with 25% off of any riflescope, binocular, laser rangefinder, or spotting scope retailing for more than $25.00.

 

Click here to print rebate coupon

 

About $129.00 - 149.00

 

 800-423-3537

 

www.simmonsoptics.com


 

Regional

Attorney: Great Lakes waterways a 'carp highway'

CHICAGO (AP) — Five states are asking a federal judge in Chicago to take emergency action to close two shipping locks and install barriers to prevent Asian carp from overrunning the Great Lakes via a "carp highway."

 

At the first hearing in the case Monday, August 23 Judge Robert M. Dow Jr. showed no signs of rushing into a decision. He scheduled Sept. 7 and 8 to hear expert testimony in the case, including from scientists about the environmental DNA testing that has found genetic material from Asian carp in Illinois waterways near Lake Michigan.

 

The judge's questions reflected awareness of the DNA test's limits.

 

"Could it have been from something that ate a fish?" the judge asked about carp DNA found in water samples. Michigan assistant attorney general Robert Reichel acknowledged a bird that ate an Asian carp could excrete carp DNA into the water. The states' experts believe it's more likely that the findings show the recent presence of carp, Reichel told the judge.

 

The judge also asked about a single 20-pound carp discovered in June, the first to be found in a Chicago waterway above the electric barrier system. The judge asked whether scientists could pinpoint how it got there. "It's not like litmus paper where it turns blue or red and you know," the judge said.

 

The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in northern Illinois, accuses the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago of creating a public nuisance by operating locks, gates and other infrastructure through which the carp could enter the lakes.  Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio, Minnesota and Pennsylvania want to temporarily close the O'Brien and Chicago locks and install barriers to stop the fish. The states' request makes

 

allowances for water releases to prevent flooding and other threats to public safety.

 

The U.S. Supreme Court has twice rejected state pleas to close the locks, but did not rule on the merits of the legal claims.  Reichel argued Monday that the threat to the Great Lakes has reached a "biological tipping point" and the waterways leading into Lake Michigan provide easy access.  "We have here a carp highway," Reichel said.

 

"Finding one Asian Carp in 10 months doesn't make the waterways a highway," Jim Farrell, an executive director with the Illinois Chamber of Commerce, said Monday in a statement. "Far from it, after 10 months of constant testing, electro-fishing, netting and fish kills which resulted in hundreds of thousands of pounds of other fish being caught and/or killed — only one Asian carp was recovered. That one fish was very likely released as were the many Asian carp found in the regions land-locked lagoons."

 

U.S. Department of Justice attorney Maureen Rudolph said Congress has given the Corps discretion in how to deal with the problem and the court should be reluctant to get involved.  Last week, the judge granted the City of Chicago, the Coalition to Save Our Waterways and Wendella Sightseeing Company permission to participate in the case. Attorneys from the three parties appeared in court Monday.

 

Lake Michigan is the sole source of Chicago's drinking water. The city is concerned about flood control and access to the locks for police and fire vehicles, according to documents filed in the case.   The coalition, which includes the barge industry and other business groups, filed documents claiming its members' financial existence would be threatened by the lock closures.   Wendella, which operates water taxis and boat tours, also said its business would be threatened by closure of the Chicago lock.


MI - Brule River Trout Habitat enhanced with DNRE “Tree Drop”

The Michigan DNRE is again partnering with We Energies, the U.S. Forest Service and the Wisconsin DNR enhance trout habitat on the Brule River in Iron County.

 

The cooperative project, known as a “tree drop,” involved using a helicopter to drop 200 trees into a one-mile stretch of river. The trees create underwater habitat structure along the banks, providing shelter for trout and other fish species. This is the second year of the three-year project, which is funded by a $70,000 grant from We Energies, and $20,000 from the U.S. Forest Service.

 

The Brule River tree drop took place Tuesday, Aug. 24 and Wednesday, Aug. 25.

 

“We are placing entire trees underwater, including the root ball, to help speed the recovery of trout populations on the Brule River,” said DNRE fisheries technician Mark Mylchreest. “Trout use the tree tops and roots for shelter and habitat, and the deeper, faster-moving current created by the fallen trees also benefits the quality of the river.”

 

The helicopter method of dropping the trees is used to minimize the amount of impact on the river’s banks,

Mylchreest added. The helicopter flights, which make up the

bulk of the project's expense, are fully funded by the U.S. Forest Service and We Energies. As part of its operating permit, the power company is required to provide funding for projects that enhance the Upper Menominee River watershed.

 

Before the tree-dropping project began in 2009, DNRE fisheries staff completed an electroshock survey of the Brule’s current trout population, with assistance from the Wisconsin DNR and U.S. Forest Service.  The results provide baseline data, allowing fisheries staff to compare the trout population each year and evaluate the success of the project. According to Mylchreest, similar DNRE projects on the Au Sable River in the Lower Peninsula have successfully benefitted trout numbers.

 

Once this year’s tree drop is complete, volunteers from the Northwoods Chapter of Trout Unlimited will anchor the trees to ensure they stay where intended and don’t wash downstream or block the river, which must remain at least 60 percent open to navigation.

 

For more information about the project, contact Mylchreest at 906-875-6622. More information about DNRE Fisheries Division management projects and research is available online at www.michigan.gov/fisheries.


Weekly Great Lakes Water Levels for August 27, 2010

Weather Conditions

Temperatures within the Great Lakes basin were generally above average last Friday.   Some parts of Michigan and northeastern Ohio experienced 90-degree temperatures.  In addition, a few remarkable rain events took place in the region last weekend. Nearly 3 inches of rain fell in Green Bay on Friday, and over 4 inches of rain fell in Syracuse on Sunday.   The story across southern Michigan is much different as only a half an inch of rain has fallen this month. Temperatures within the basin have been moderate during the current workweek, and are expected to be near average on Friday.  On Saturday and Sunday, however, temperatures will be around 10 degrees above average in much of the central and western portions of the basin.  These above average temperatures will continue into the next workweek.  There is little chance of rain within the Great Lakes basin this weekend and into next week.

Lake Level Conditions

Each of the Great Lakes continue to be below what they were a year ago. Currently, the lakes range from 5 to 8 inches below last year's levels. Over the next 30 days, Lake Superior is expected to rise 1 inch, while Lake Michigan-Huron is forecasted to decline 2 inches. It is predicted that Lakes St. Clair, Erie, and Ontario will decline 6, 4, and 6 inches, respectively, during the next month.

 Forecasted August Outflows/Channel Conditions

The outflows from Lake Superior into the St. Mary's River, and 

from Lake Huron into the St. Clair River, are predicted to be below average in August, while Lake St. Clair's outflow into the

Detroit River is expected to be near average during the month.  The Niagara River's flow from Lake Erie is predicted to be slightly below average, and the flow in the St. Lawrence River is forecasted to be below average throughout August.

Alerts

Users of the Great Lakes, connecting channels and St. Lawrence River should keep informed of current conditions before undertaking any activities that could be affected by changing water levels.  Mariners should utilize navigation charts and refer to current water level readings.

 

 

Superior

Mich-Huron

St. Clair

Erie

Ontario

Level for Aug 27

601.12

578.15

574.25

571.36

245.60

Datum, in ft

601.1

577.5

572.3

569.2

243.3

Diff in inches

 0

+8

+23

+26

+28

Diff last month

+1

-2

-3

-5

 -6

Diff from last yr

-7

-8

-7

-7

-5


Illinois

Fishing Programs, Outdoor Info Featured at State Fair Aug. 28-Sept. 6

DUQUOIN, IL – The Illinois DNR invites visitors to the DuQuoin State Fair to stop by the Conservation Village area at the fair for activities and information about outdoor recreation and natural resources protection in Illinois. The Conservation Village area on the DuQuoin fairgrounds is open from noon until 7 p.m. each day of the DuQuoin State Fair, August 28- September 6. 

 

“Conservation Village is a great place for youth, families, and outdoor recreation enthusiasts of all ages to stop by and sample outdoor opportunities in Illinois while visiting the DuQuoin fair,” said IDNR Director Marc Miller.  “We have a wealth of great outdoors programs and sites in southern Illinois, and Conservation Village provides a chance to encourage everyone to get outside and enjoy the natural wonders of our state.”

 

Information tents at Conservation Village are located in the center of the DuQuoin fairgrounds on Expo Drive just south of the Expo Hall.  Conservation Village features information and displays on outdoor recreation opportunities and IDNR programs.  Natural resources professionals will be on hand

 

throughout the fair to talk about fishing and hunting, state parks, restoration ecology, mines and minerals, and other programs.

 

Visitors to Conservation Village can also talk with IDNR Conservation Police officers about the regulations and laws governing fishing, hunting, and boating in Illinois.  Also featured is the beautiful woodwork of “Come See What We Saw” Bear Tracks Chainsaw Carving by Mike and Wendy Rhodes.

 

Fishing programs will be conducted at the lake on the DuQuoin fairgrounds located between RV World and the Expo Building.

The IDNR Urban Fishing Program will on hand each weekday of the fair from 4 - 7 p.m. and on the weekends and Labor Day from noon - 7 p.m.  Adults and youngsters can practice their casting techniques and view fish displays. 

 

The IDNR will also host fishing clinics for area school groups at the DuQuoin State Fair on Thursday and Friday, Sept. 2 and 3, from 10:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.  Each clinic will last approximately one-half hour.


“Living with White-tailed Deer in Illinois” Website Launched

Valuable resource for Illinois landowners, hunters

SPRINGFIELD, IL – A new website, “Living with White-tailed Deer in Illinois,” has been developed through the cooperative efforts of the Illinois DNR and U of Illinois.

 

The website provides Illinois residents with information about

how to coexist with Illinois’ white-tailed deer.  The website focuses on white-tailed deer natural history, the IDNR’s

strategy for managing the deer population, damage prevention and abatement techniques, public health and safety information, what to do about injured or orphaned deer, and the role landowners and hunters can play in managing Illinois’ deer population.   The link to the new website is http://web.extension.illinois.edu/deer/.


Indiana

Salamonie Senior Citizen Fall Fest, September 13-16

The 2010 Salamonie Senior Fall Fest will take place Sept. 13-16, at the Salamonie Reservoir Interpretive Center. Anyone over age 50 is welcome for a few days of fun, during which he or she could learn a new hobby such as drop spinning, knitting or wood carving.

 

The week begins on Monday with the monthly seniors carry-in luncheon at 12:30 p.m., featuring a presentation on Alpacas by Tom Burkhart. Bread and butter making begins at 3 p.m.

 

Tuesday activities begin at 8 a.m. with fishing, followed by a cement leaf craft, drop spinning, dishcloth knitting , a blacksmith demonstration and more fishing, ending with a fireside music jam.

 

Wednesday begins with apple cider making at 9 a.m., a carry-in dinner at noon, T-shirt leaf prints, wood carving, and entertainment in the evening.

 

Thursday ends the fest with a Dutch oven demo and a carry-in brunch at 10:30 a.m.

Participating seniors will pay the $2 program fee at the interpretive center upon arrival, which will give them one program pass to be used for all of the week's events. Donations are always welcome and are used to help fund local programs and services.  Campers should note that campsites should be reserved and paid for using the Central Reservation System. Call 1-866-6CAMPIN or see www.CAMP.IN.gov

 

This special event is located in Lost Bridge West Recreation Area on Highway 105 in western Huntington County. There is a $5 entrance fee ($7 for out-of-state vehicles) to enter the Lost Bridge West Recreation Area. Indiana residents may purchase an annual entrance permit for $36. Ages 65 or older may choose to purchase the annual Golden Hoosier Passport entrance permit for $18.

 

See www.dnr.IN.gov/uwis/  for more information or to download a registration form. Registration forms can also be requested by calling (260) 468-2127 or visiting the Salamonie Interpretive Center. Early registration is requested to help prepare for the event.


Fowl hunting workshop at Lake Monroe, Oct. 9

People of all ages interested in learning more about waterfowl hunting should plan on heading to Lake Monroe for a free workshop on the subject on Oct. 9.  The workshop, which is being presented by the DNR, will be at the North Fork Service Area 9–1 PM, with lunch provided.

 

“Waterfowling parents are welcome to bring interested children to the workshop, but it is not intended to be a youth-only event,” said Adam Phelps, waterfowl biologist. “This workshop will be aimed at novice waterfowl hunters of any age.   “It can be daunting to start waterfowling, so we are planning to present the basics of the sport to those who want to try it or have only been hunting waterfowl for a few years at most.”

 

Phelps clarified that the event is not intended for experienced

duck or goose hunters, who would be unlikely to gain much new information.  Subjects of presentations will include

waterfowl hunting regulations; duck and goose identification; equipment; and techniques, including a “show and tell” segment.

 

“We will have a lot of equipment there for folks to see, including blinds, waders, clothing, decoys, gadgets, and a duck boat or two,” Phelps said, “but we want to stress that one can successfully hunt waterfowl with a minimum of outlay.”  DNR law enforcement personnel will be available to answer questions, as will personnel from several Fish and Wildlife Areas and reservoirs, as well as private lands biologists.

 

Advance registration required; call South Region DNR Law Enforcement at (812) 837-9536. More info? Adam Phelps, (812) 334-1137, aphelps@dnr.in.gov


Michigan

Brule River Trout Habitat enhanced with DNRE “Tree Drop”

The Michigan DNRE is again partnering with We Energies, the U.S. Forest Service and the Wisconsin DNR enhance trout habitat on the Brule River in Iron County.

 

The cooperative project, known as a “tree drop,” involved using a helicopter to drop 200 trees into a one-mile stretch of river. The trees create underwater habitat structure along the banks, providing shelter for trout and other fish species. This is the second year of the three-year project, which is funded by a $70,000 grant from We Energies, and $20,000 from the U.S. Forest Service.

 

The Brule River tree drop took place Tuesday, Aug. 24 and Wednesday, Aug. 25.

 

“We are placing entire trees underwater, including the root ball, to help speed the recovery of trout populations on the Brule River,” said DNRE fisheries technician Mark Mylchreest. “Trout use the tree tops and roots for shelter and habitat, and the deeper, faster-moving current created by the fallen trees also benefits the quality of the river.”

 

The helicopter method of dropping the trees is used to minimize the amount of impact on the river’s banks,

Mylchreest added. The helicopter flights, which make up the bulk of the project's expense, are fully funded by the U.S. Forest Service and We Energies. As part of its operating permit, the power company is required to provide funding for projects that enhance the Upper Menominee River watershed.

 

Before the tree-dropping project began in 2009, DNRE fisheries staff completed an electroshock survey of the Brule’s current trout population, with assistance from the Wisconsin DNR and U.S. Forest Service.  The results provide baseline data, allowing fisheries staff to compare the trout population each year and evaluate the success of the project. According to Mylchreest, similar DNRE projects on the Au Sable River in the Lower Peninsula have successfully benefitted trout numbers.

 

Once this year’s tree drop is complete, volunteers from the Northwoods Chapter of Trout Unlimited will anchor the trees to ensure they stay where intended and don’t wash downstream or block the river, which must remain at least 60 percent open to navigation.

 

For more information about the project, contact Mylchreest at 906-875-6622. More information about DNRE Fisheries Division management projects and research is available online at www.michigan.gov/fisheries.


Minnesota

Wetlands: A big sponge

Wetlands are like giant sponges.  They soak up water and hold it.  Along with water, wetlands soak up sediments and excess nutrients and help prevent flooding.

 

Wetlands stabilize lake levels and recharge groundwater.  Wetlands are habitat for a many diverse plants and animals.  Unfortunately, wetlands along Minnesota’s lakes and rivers

are often disrupted to create boat docks and swimming

beaches.  The loss of a lake’s wetland areas, including breaking up wetlands into smaller parcels, harms water quality, fish populations, and can impact water levels.

 

Did you know?  In Minnesota, more than 52 % of our original wetlands have been lost due to development. Everything we do on the land impacts our waters


Pennsylvania

Game Commission Seeks Citizen Advisory Committee Volunteers

The Pennsylvania Game Commission is calling for nominations of citizens willing to participate in one of four Citizen Advisory Committees (CACs) to help gather input related to the deer management goal of reducing deer-human conflict in three Wildlife Management Units (WMUs) in 2011.

 

All nominations will be compiled and presented to the Commonwealth's Office of Strategic Services, who will interview potential candidates, make the final selections of participants and facilitate the meetings. The Game Commission does not participate in the selection process, and there is no guarantee that any nominee will be selected or even contacted for an interview CAC Nomination Form can be

downloaded from the Game Commission website (www.pgc.state.pa.us) by clicking on "White-Tailed Deer" on the homepage, and then choose "Citizens Advisory Committee." Individuals also may contact the Game Commission by phone at 717-787-5529 to obtain a CAC Nomination Form, which should be returned to the address provided on the form.
 

Nominees must live in the WMU in which they apply and must complete a CAC Nomination Form to be considered. All nominations must be received by Sept. 15.

For further information, visit the Game Commission's website (
www.pgc.state.pa.us) click on "White-tailed Deer", and then choose "Citizens Advisory Committee


Wisconsin

Surveys show good survival of young perch in Green Bay

Third highest abundance in 30 years

PESHTIGO – Recently completed fish surveys for yellow perch in Green Bay show good news: the third highest abundance in 30 years for fish hatched earlier this spring, state fisheries biologists say.

 

“Once again we’re seeing a very strong year-class,” says Tammie Paoli, DNR fisheries biologist in Peshtigo. “Numbers are up and the fish are larger than last year at this time, which is indicative of the early hatch and warm water temperatures encountered this spring and summer.” Earlier this month, young-of-year perch were 2.5 to 3 inches long.

 

Paoli is hopeful that this year class of fish will be different than other classes in recent years that have survived their first summer in good numbers but many of which have died before reaching a catchable size.  “We’ve been getting some pretty decent year classes for quite a while now, but we are not seeing adults in the numbers we’d like to. There seems to be a lot of mortality occurring at some point in their first one to two years.”

 

While Paoli and other DNR biologists don’t know the exact reasons for the perch mortality, they do have some suspects: predation from other fish species, such as walleye and/or northern pike, which both seem to be doing well in the bay; or bird predation, specifically cormorants, which are at high numbers and are the subject of control efforts by the DNR and Wildlife Services of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The two agencies have been oiling cormorant eggs and conducting some limited sharp shooting to trim back the birds’ numbers, as described in this February 2008 Wisconsin Natural Resources magazine article, Cormorant Conundrum.

 

The goal is to reduce the number of nesting pairs to 6,000

 

from the 15,000 estimated now.

 

Fishing reports for most of the summer have reflected the fishery’s skewing toward young, small fish, Paoli says. “We’ve heard reports of good fishing but a lot of small fish. So again, this kind of goes back to the idea that some of these fish may be cropped off at a younger age.” 

 

The yellow perch season on Green Bay runs from May 20 through March 15, and there is a daily bag of 15 with no length limit. Anglers tend to start keeping perch when they are about 8 inches long, a size they tend to reach in their second or third year, she says.  In the last week or so, DNR creel clerks who survey anglers about their catch have reported some improved catches. “So the size of fish people have been catching could be related to water temperature, fish moving around.”

 

The DNR crews were able to complete the surveys this year using trawling nets early despite intense heat, humidity, and fog, Paoli says. The relative abundance combining shallow and deep sites increased from 1,211 per hour spent trawling in 2009 to 2,581 per hour in 2010. The other two years which were higher were 1986, when 4,480 per hour were hauled in, and 2003, with a rate of 7,868 per hour. The majority of the young perch were captured near the mouth of the Peshtigo and Pensaukee rivers and in the Little Tail Point area.

 

Other notable items from the survey:

  • Alewife abundance fell, which had been increasing slightly each year since 2007.

  • Smelt abundance rose, which has been increasing slightly each year since 2007.

  • Round goby catch rates were at the second highest since they were first captured in trawl surveys in 2003, with the majority captured near the Peshtigo and Little Rivers in the northern portion of Wisconsin waters.


State repeals waiting period for deer bow hunters to purchase archery licenses

MADISON – Archery deer hunters no longer have to wait three days after purchasing a license during the open season to begin hunting in Wisconsin. The State Legislature removed the three-day waiting period restriction during the recent legislative session at the request of the Department of Natural Resources.

 

“The law has outlived its usefulness,” said Tom Van Haren, DNR conservation warden. “The three-day waiting period is an obstacle for young hunters who celebrate their tenth birthday during the archery season and have to wait until then to purchase their license.”

 

The waiting period was originally enacted to discourage deer hunters from waiting until they killed a deer before purchasing a license and to discourage a person from buying a license for someone who had killed a deer but either did not have a tag, or did not want to use the tag on their deer.

 

“The waiting period is inconvenient for anyone who didn’t purchase a license prior to the season then realizes they have the coming weekend open with time to go hunting. If they do

 

not think to purchase the license ahead of time they are unable to use the license that weekend. It has especially been a deterrent for non-residents who travel great distances to Wisconsin on a Thursday or Friday to spend the weekend with family or friends or for the primary purpose to archery hunt for deer.”

 

Van Haren said that before the law was changed the deer population was low and the number of deer a person could get tags for was limited.  “Basically, each archer was issued just a tag that was good for a buck or an antlerless deer. The fact is, abundant harvest tags are now available in most deer management units making it possible to harvest multiple deer legally,” he added.

 

The requirement that people wear a back tag while hunting reduces the incidence of hunting without a license. If a conservation warden suspects that something is wrong, the warden can find out instantly through the automated licensing system, when a license was purchased right down to the minute, which is also printed on the license or back tag. In 2009, bow hunters purchased 208, 022 licenses in Wisconsin.


Early Canada goose, mourning dove seasons open Sept. 1

MADISON – Sept. 1 marks the start of the fall hunting seasons, with the statewide opening of the early Canada goose and mourning dove seasons. The early Canada goose season runs from Sept. 1-15 statewide and requires a $3

early Canada goose permit. The Burnett County subzone closed area has been eliminated and is now open to goose hunting.

 

The dove season runs Sept. 1 through Nov. 9.


Other Breaking News Items

(Click on title or URL to read full article)

Emotions run high over dam removal questions
There are close to 200 hydroelectric dams in Michigan, and almost half of those stopped making power a long time ago. Many of these dams are getting old and they need attention.

 

EDITORIAL: Screening fish bait should help prevent Asian carp invasion
The revelation that fishermen could bring carp into the Great Lakes is seldom mentioned by those who are upset that yet another invasive species may soon degrade the lakes.

Illinois rivermen bemoan impact of Asian carp
The Asian carp's arrival in Illinois a decade ago has impacted the state in a variety of ways.

 

ENERGY: Will town opposition block offshore turbines?
The town boards of Greece and Webster, New York, have formalized their opposition to a potential Lake Ontario offshore wind project. But will that be enough to sway state Power Authority officials?

Cormorants' diet choice aids anglers
Double-crested cormorants are feasting on round gobies, leaving more sport fish, especially small-mouthed bass and yellow perch, for anglers

 

Judge calls hearing "Sad day" for tribe

MANISTIQUE - The tribal judge who sentenced three members of the Sault Ste. Marie Chippewa Tribe for violating their fishing rights, described  the hearing as a "sad day" for the tribe.  They were found in violation of most of the 105 citations issued against them in connection

 

Scientists say the toxic blue-green algae will only get worse on Ohio lakes
The simmering summer of 2010 is coughing up a sickly and unprecedented batch of toxic blue-green algae in western Lake Erie and nearly a dozen of Ohio's shallow, inland lakes. Many lake scientists are speculating that it's only going to get worse.

 

Volunteer cormorant harassment program on Oneida Lake to begin again

Cormorant harassment on Oneida Lake will begin again  soon. Dave Lemon, an aquatic biologist with NYSDEC is overseeing the pilot volunteer program on the lake this fall.  Nearly 30 volunteers from the Oneida Lake Association and local B.A.S.S. Chapter have stepped forward …

 

Volunteer cormorant harassment program on Oneida Lake to begin after training session
It looks like cormorant harassment on Oneida Lake will begin again — soon. Dave Lemon, an aquatic biologist from the state Department of Environmental Conservation’s Cortland office, is overseeing the pilot volunteer program on the lake this fall.

 

Kansas waterways at risk as Invasive carp spread

The school of fish, By the hundreds of thousands, stretches as far as can be seen down the Kansas River in Kansas City. Fish are so thick, a quick scoop with a fishing net grabs 50 or more. They're Asian carp, and though now only 10 inches long, some …

 

 

 

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