Week of October 11, 2010

Misc New Fishing-Boating Products
Hunting & Shooting Products/Issues
National

Regional

General

Illinois
Indiana
Michigan
New York
Pennsylvania
Wisconsin
Canada
Other Breaking News Items

 

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       New Product  Archives

Misc New Fishing-Boating Products

MarCum LCD Underwater Cameras LCD VS620 and classic VS380

Underwater Cameras raise the bar on viewing system category

 For over a decade, MarCum Technologies underwater cameras have flown under the figurative radar of the angling public. Not that MarCum cameras haven’t been in use on the ice and inside the boats of some of North America’s most astute anglers. But up until now, they’ve played the part of silent assassin; the four-star gourmet restaurant amid a profusion of fast food joints serving junk food.

 

The word is out. This year, MarCum has reawakened the marine electronics scene, offering anglers awesome underwater camera advancements at sweet value prices. No longer just the elite angler’s choice in technology and quality, MarCum introduces a new generation of high-performance underwater cameras with the proposition of value. The new MarCum VS620 is a perfect example of high technology at a great price, while the classic VS380 remains the top value in underwater cameras today.

 

Priced at $399.99, the new feature rich VS620 provides crystal clear glimpses of fish, cover, and the entire underwater landscape, all in a totally waterproof 6-inch Flat Panel B&W LCD. With advanced Solar-Intelligent Technology the LCD plays underwater images in dazzling clarity, and 3 times brighter than ever. Solar-Intelligent Technology represents the next generation in underwater viewing, allowing anglers to utilize their cameras in all settings—from sunny days in bass boats to fishing piers to holes in the ice.

 

Offering the same premium SONY Super HAD CCD optics as

 

 the VS620, the user-friendly VS380 provides total system performance, delivering the clearest, sharpest underwater picture available in a jumbo 7- inch CRT display.

 

MarCum really is the SONY Bravia of underwater cameras,” says professional guide James Holst, host of In-Depth Angling TV. “But to get MarCum’s trademark picture quality, and to experience it on high-resolution display screens at these prices is pretty amazing. MarCum has always made the best performing underwater cameras, and now they’re also the most affordable—that’s pretty amazing. No matter how much you use sonar, there’s still no substitute for a live picture of the underwater world. For these reasons, I simply can’t afford not to have a MarCum in my boat or on the ice at all times.”

 

As complete viewing systems, the VS620 and VS380 both feature MarCum’s patented Darkwater LED Lighting Technology—field-proven to boost visibility in dark and dirty water. Other accoutrements include a rechargeable 12-volt battery, all new 3-stage auto battery charger, and camera Stabilizer Fin for in-boat trolling. Finally, a Deluxe Padded Softpack protects the VS620 or VS380 for years of use.

 

About $ 300.00

 

888-778-1208      service@versae.com

 

www.marcumtech.com 

 


New Showdown Ice-Troller Redefines Mobility and Ice Fishing Sonar

“Trolling” Is No Longer Exclusive To Fishing from a Boat

“When I’m out searching for fish on the ice,” says professional guide Tony Roach, “I like to go into stealth mode. Just a rod, an auger, and this slick little fish-finder inside my coat pocket.”

 

Indeed, ice-fishing sonar has entered the iPod era. The new ShowDown Ice-Troller is just that—the first hand-held, totally functional ice fishing sonar. Ice-Troller doesn’t just fit into a 5-gallon bucket, it’s a lightweight little palm-sized device that does everything a sonar unit should—and more.

 

Conceived by MarCum Technologies’, the ShowDown Ice-Troller sets new benchmarks in sonar design and performance. Just like the original ShowDown, Ice-Troller features an easy-to-interpret backlit, digital vertical LCD matched to an intuitive push-button operating system. Add in MarCum’s proven, patented Interference Rejection System and 25-Level Sensitivity, and you’ve got one smooth-running sonar that’s light on its feet.

 

Ice-Troller even includes a built-in LCD heater for use in extreme cold. And an Auto Range function immediately locks onto depth, displaying targets from 1 to 120-feet of water. Attached to a 20-degree transducer and 6-feet of cable, Ice-Troller provides instant depth, structure, and fish information.

Six AA batteries keep the sonar juiced for up to 20 hours of

continuous use.

 

“The new ShowDown Ice-Troller is the perfect match for my run-and-gun style of ice fishing,” offers Roach, the original ice-troller. “With this cool device in my hand, I can cover huge areas quickly— just drill and dip the transducer. No bending over, no carrying a big heavy flasher. It’s almost as easy as trolling with my boat. The Ice-Troller helps me map a structure fast, and it makes quick work of locating fish under the ice. I don’t care if you’re a guide or not, finding fish fast is still the name of the game.”

 

Having found the hotspot, Ice-Troller instantly converts into your primary sonar unit. Simply snap the Ice -Troller module onto a 12-volt Performance Pack (sold separately). The Performance Pack includes a padded neoprene softcase, adjustable transducer arm, cord stopper, Quick-Connect sonar shuttle, and 3-stage auto battery charger. A 12-volt rechargeable battery (sold separately) bypasses AA batteries for extended operation.

 

888-778-1208      service@versae.com

 

www.marcumtech.com 


Classic Lazer Mag cutting machine improves with age

How to upgrade a wintertime legend

A steadfast power tool is a thing of beauty—starts like clockwork, does its job with power and precision, and hums along like a fine-tuned German engine. If you’re wielding StrikeMaster’s advanced Lazer Mag power ice auger, these are fitting descriptions indeed. Through countless winters, StrikeMaster’s classic cutting machines have remained the choice of legendary anglers, such as Dave Genz, Tom Neustrom, Brian Brosdahl and Gary Roach. More specifically, the Lazer Mag has been the workhorse auger for you and I—everyday anglers who simply demand trustworthy performance tools.

 

So the question becomes, how to build upon a legend, to make a great machine even better? Last season, StrikeMaster overhauled the popular Lazer Mag, adding a precision-powered German Solo® engine. Instantly, anglers across the ice-belt were drilling twice as many holes with less effort than thought possible. Meanwhile, engine emissions and oily odors were cut to almost nothing.

 

And yet, StrikeMaster engineers still weren’t 100% content. So they further improved the machine’s durability to match its performance. This year’s class of Lazer Mags have been fitted with High Impact Composite Handles—giving ice anglers an ergonomic, yet lightweight drilling experience.  “I’ve relied on

Lazer Mag augers for a lot of years,” says another legend, Mr. Walleye, Gary Roach. “Cold, nasty winters can be brutal on

gear, but these machines are even tougher. The best fishing tools are the ones you don’t have to think about—they just work. That pretty much describes my Lazer Mag.”

 

Specifics Include:

• Precision-powered 42 cc, 2.5-hp

 engine by Solo® Germany

• Jet-quick 40:1 gear ratio

Heat Treated Gears

• 24-ounce gas tank

• Available in 6”, 7”, 8” and 10” drill sizes

• Light and compact (24- to 29 lbs)

• New High Impact Composite Handles

• Stainless steel, cutlery grade blades

• Quiet, low emission operation

 

763-263-8999      strikemaster@sherbtel.net

 

www.strikemaster.com


Hunting & Shooting Products/Issues

Sport Shooter or Varmint Hunter Night Vision Weapon Sight

South San Francisco, CA - American Technologies Network, Corporation manufactures night vision gear for law enforcement and the military and their commercial market scopes and sights are made with the same demanding requirements for durability, optical clarity, accuracy and night vision performance. The ATN Night Arrow6-CGT is a weapon scope providing excellent observation, target acquisition and aiming capabilities for sport shooters or varmint hunters.

 

The CGT type of Image Intensifier tubes are engineered for significantly enhanced performance over standard 2nd generation IITs. The CGT IIT is a Multi-Alkali compact 18mm format MCP Image Intensifier. Highlights of the CGT specifications are typical SNR of 16-22 and resolution of 45-54 lp/mm. CGT IITs are sensitive in a wide spectral band and thus provide good contrast in all scene circumstances.

The ATN Night Arrow6-CGT features a "Red on Green" reticle system with a 1/6 MOA adjustment and an automatic brightness control (ABC) for tube protection. The center red reticle is illuminated for optimal contrast against a dark or light target. The light and compact sight features a non-reflective matte black finish and mounts to a standard weaver rail system. It is weather resistant and is designed to use 1 AA

type battery. One-knob operation allows for easy one-handed use.

 

The ATN Night Arrow6-CGT also features the Total Darkness IR System, Proshield Lens Coating and Automatic Brightness control. Accessories include a detachable IR450 infrared illuminator, battery, instruction manual, lens tissue and warranty card.

 

ATN Night Arrow6-CGT Specifications:
IIT type CGT
Magnification 6x
Resolution 45-54 lp/mm
Power Supply (1) 1.5V AA battery
Battery Life 30 hrs
FOV 5°
Range of Focus 10m to Infinity
Operating Temperature -40°C to +50C°
Storage Temperature -50° to +70° C
Environmental rating Water resistant
Dimensions 335 x 103 x 93mm
13.2" x 4.1" x 3.7"
Weight 1.7 kg/ 3.8 lb

 

About $1,795.00


 

National

Federal Bill to Protect Traditional Fishing Tackle introduced

Help Fight Unreasonable Bans on Fishing Tackle; Send a letter to your Senators urging them to support S.3850
On Wednesday, September 28, Senator Blanche Lincoln (D-AR) introduced
S.3850, which seeks to prevent an overarching federal ban on lead in recreational fishing tackle. If enacted, this ban will have a significant economic impact on anglers and the recreational fishing industry.

 

The EPA previously announced, in a letter to the petitioners, they did not have the legal authority to ban traditional ammunition.   However, in that same letter, they indicated that the EPA does have the authority to review the second portion of the petition regarding traditional fishing tackle.

 

Senate Bill 3850 will exempt traditional fishing tackle, in a way similar to traditional ammo, from being regulated under the TSCA.  The legislation also includes language strengthening the protections for traditional ammunition by clarifying that its components remain exempt.

 

The reasons to support this legislation are: 

  • The data does not support a federal ban on lead sinkers used for fishing. In general, bird populations, including loons and other waterfowl species, are subject to many more substantial threats such as habitat loss through shoreline development. Any lead restrictions on fishing tackle need to be based on sound science that supports the appropriate action for a particular water body or species.

 

             

           

 

  • A federal ban of the use of lead in fishing tackle will have a significant negative impact on recreational anglers and fisheries resources, but a negligible impact on waterfowl populations. 
     

  • Depending on the alternative metal and current prevailing raw material costs, non-lead fishing tackle products can cost from ten to twenty times more than lead products. Non-lead products may not be as available and most do not perform as well. Mandatory transitioning to non-lead fishing tackle would require significant and costly changes from both the industry and anglers.
     

  • America's 60 million anglers generate over $45 billion in retail sales with a $125 billion impact on the nation’s economy, creating employment for over one million people.  

  •  

Please click here to be directed to a letter that you can send to your Senators asking them to support S.3850.

 

 

 

 

 


Canada launches comprehensive, basin-wide, bi-national Asian carp risk assessment

Announces Proactive Action Plan to Protect the Great Lakes from Asian Carp

Great Lakes Fishery Commission Lauds Canada’s Plan to assess risk of Asian Carp

Toronto, Ontario – Canada’s Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, Gail She, has announced that the Government of Canada has begun proactive work under a new Action Plan to combat the threat posed by invasive Asian carp to the Great Lakes and its tributaries.  “Our Government understands the value of the Great Lakes fishery to Ontarians and Canadians, and we are taking proactive, targeted action to ensure that this unique freshwater resource is protected for the benefit of future generations,” said Minister Shea.

 

The Government of Canada is launching the comprehensive, basin-wide, bi-national Asian carp risk assessment that will take approximately 18 months to complete. The risk assessment will be conducted jointly between scientists in Canada and the United States; the Great Lakes Fishery Commission will facilitate the project.  This risk assessment will be the first binational effort to evaluate the likelihood of Asian carps spreading throughout the Great Lakes basin and to gauge the potential effect of the species on the Great Lakes ecosystem. The assessment will involve preeminent scientists in the field, will be peer-reviewed, and should take about eighteen months to complete.

 

We are not taking the threat to the Great Lakes lightly," Becky Cudmore, senior research scientist for Fisheries and Oceans Canada, told us. An expert on aquatic risk assessment, Ms. Cudmore is Senior Science Advisor for Aquatic Invasive Species and will be heading up the team of bi-national experts on this project.  The work will pinpoint key areas within the Great Lakes basin most vulnerable to invasion and identify likely routes where they could enter the Canadian side of the lake system.

 

The Asian carp has been found in the Mississippi River system in the U.S. and could eventually enter the Great Lakes, where it would be very difficult to control their spread to other lakes and beyond. Asian carp aggressively compete with native fishes for food and habitat and quickly become the dominant species. This could have a significant negative impact on the natural biodiversity of freshwater ecosystems.

 

The results of the project will help to identify potential habitat and spawning locations for Asian carp, and transfer routes to help guide prevention, monitoring, rapid response, and control

efforts by authorities on both sides of the border. By gaining a

greater understanding of the potential spread, population numbers and specific impacts of Asian carp, the Government will be prepared to take immediate, effective actions against any emerging threats to Canadian waters.

 

The United States Government welcomed the announcement, which reaffirms the Government of Canada’s ongoing commitment to practical and constructive cross-border engagement to protect shared freshwater ecosystems. “The United States Government is pleased that Canada is making this important contribution to help address the threats posed by Asian carp in the Great Lakes,” said David Jacobson, U.S. Ambassador to Canada. “These efforts will supplement the work underway by the United States to implement our Asian Carp Control Strategy Framework and Action Plan," added Mr. Jacobson.”

 

“Protecting the Great Lakes from Asian carp is critical to the United States and we welcome this collaborative action from the Canadian Government,” added John Goss, Director of Asian Carp at the White House Council on Environmental Quality. “Joint efforts between the United States and Canadian Governments will further the aggressive response to prevent this invasive species from establishing itself in the Great Lakes.”

 

“The Great Lakes Fishery Commission commends Canada for launching this initiative to better understand the potential for Asian carps to spread throughout the Great Lakes ecosystem,” said David Ullrich, the commission’s U.S. Section Chair.  “With this risk assessment, we will have a vastly improved understanding about where Asian carps might establish a population within the basin, as well as important information about the probable impact of Asian carps on the fishery and environment, should they enter the lakes.”

 

The Government of Canada has allocated approximately $415,000 over the next two years to fund this project, with an additional in-kind contribution from the Great Lakes Fishery Commission (GLFC). This funding is in addition to the $4 million invested through Budget 2010 to support the Department’s national Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) program.

 

The Great Lakes contain 20 percent of the world’s above-ground freshwater. The combined annual value of the commercial and recreational fisheries in lakes Superior, Huron, Michigan, Erie and Ontario is estimated to be $7 billion.


Risk assessment details for Asian carps in the Great Lakes

Senior research scientist for Fisheries and Oceans Canada Becky Cudmore, on October 7, offered us details of the planned bi-national regional risk assessment.

 

"We will be conducting research that will complement ongoing work in the U.S. to look at potential entry points, food supply, habitat and spawning habitat availability, potential spread and impact in Canadian waters" said Ms. Cudmore. "The results of this research, along with those from the U.S., will feed into a binational risk assessment.  We anticipate the risk assessment will help clear up uncertainties surrounding potential introduction, survival, establishment and impact in

 

the Great Lakes, and provide science-based advice for

managers to direct activities.  As Asian carps are not yet in Canadian waters, I think this is an excellent opportunity to be proactive and provide key information to help with our goal of preventing the establishment of Asian carps in the Great Lakes."

 

Cudmore added "Fisheries and Oceans Canada will be leading the Canadian research, while it's Centre for Expertise for Aquatic Risk

 

Assessment will lead the risk assessment, which will be coordinated by the Great Lakes Fishery Commission."


West Virginia’s Taylor Elected 2010-2011 President of the Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies

WASHINGTON, DC —The Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies elected West Virginia Division of Natural Resources Wildlife Resources Section Chief, Curtis I. Taylor, its new president during the Association’s 100th Annual Meeting in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He is tasked to lead AFWA’s national agenda for sound, science-based fish and wildlife

management through September 2011.

 

The Association of Fish and Wildlife Agenciesthe organization that represents North America’s fish and wildlife agencies—promotes sound management and conservation, and speaks with a collective voice on important fish and wildlife issues. Found on the web at www.fishwildlife.org.


Regional

Weekly Great Lakes Water Levels for October 8, 2010

Weather Conditions

The Great Lakes basin has received clear skies and dry weather so far this week which will continue hrough Sunday.  Temperatures were below seasonal averages at the start of the week and rose throughout the week.  Temperatures are currently warmer than seasonal averages and will peak over the weekend.  Temperatures will steadily decline over the course of next week.  There are chances of showers and thunderstorms for Monday and Tuesday with cloudy skies expected to remain through Wednesday.

 Lake Level Conditions

Each of the Great Lakes continues to be below its level of a year ago. Currently, the lakes range from 1 to 8 inches below last year's levels. Over the next 30 days, Lake Superior is expected to decline 1 inch, while Lake Michigan-Huron is forecasted to decline 3 inches. It is predicted that Lakes St. Clair, Erie, and Ontario will decline 7, 4, and 5 inches, respectively, during the next month.

Forecasted October Outflows/Channel Conditions

The outflows from Lake Superior into the St. Mary's River, from Lake Huron into the St. Clair River, and from Lake St. Clair into the Detroit River are expected to be below average in October.  The Niagara River's flow from Lake Erie is also predicted to be below average, and the flow in the St. Lawrence River is

forecasted to be above average throughout October.

Alerts

Lake Superior's water level is currently below chart datum and forecasted to remain below datum over the next six months.  Users of the Great Lakes, connecting channels and St. Lawrence River should keep informed of current conditions before undertaking any activities that could be affected by changing water levels.  Mariners should utilize navigation charts and refer to current water level readings.

 

 

Superior

Mich-Huron

St. Clair

Erie

Ontario

Level for Oct 8

601.05

577.79

573.85

570.83

244.88

Datum, in ft

601.1

577.5

572.3

569.2

243.3

Diff in inches

 -1

+3

+19

+20

+19

Diff last month

-2

-2

0

-2

 -6

Diff from last yr

-7

-8

-3

-6

-1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


General

Hunters and Fishermen at High Risk of Drowning

WASHINGTON - Hunters and fishermen in small boats pose the highest risk for drowning.  In cool weather, pleasure boaters’ dwindle and lakes and rivers play host to hunters and fisherman.  Many times, these outdoorsmen don’t see themselves as “boaters”.  They are hunters and fishermen.  The boat is simply a tool of the trade; little more than a means to the end of bringing home dinner, a trophy, or a good fish story.

 

Hunters and fishermen rarely take a safe boating classes offered by the Coast Guard Auxiliary or the US Power Squadron.  Wearing a Life Jacket is often viewed as uncomfortable and in the way.

 

Small craft are often unstable.  Their center of gravity is altered by small movements.  Falling overboard is easy, even without a collision, bad weather, or high speeds.

 

People sometimes stand in a boat raising the boat’s center of gravity and reducing the boat’s stability.  As the boat shifts and rocks, passengers may lose their balance and fall into the water.  The water is cool enough to trigger a gasp reflex upon sudden immersion.  As people inhale water, they begin to drown.

 

Hunters and fisherman spend much of their time in shallow water around standing timber, submerged rocks, and logs; as these are a great habitat in which to locate (or hide from) their quarry.  Unfortunately, falling headfirst from a standing position into shallow water around rocks and logs is a very good way to be knocked unconscious and drown.  A person can also hit one’s head on the gunwales of their own boat.

 

Don’t drink and fish or hunt.  Balance will be impaired and resistance to hypothermia be reduced.  Judgment will be diminished - deadly mix.

 

Remember; always wear a Coast Guard Approved Life Jacket when in a boat.  Having one on board but stowed under the seat won’t help you in the water.  Fish or hunt with a buddy.  It’s more fun, and there’s someone there to help you if there’s a problem.  When alone, you could be in serious trouble for a long time before anyone even misses you. File a Float Plan.  Make sure someone knows where you are, and when you’re expected back.  Save the alcohol for when you get home with your catch. And, take a Safe Boating Class and get a Vessel Safety Check. 

 

Have fun, and come home safe!


Beware the Cyberscare

Big Brother wants more power over the Internet

The Washington Times, September 30, 2010

The same people who brought you the global warming and Y2K scares have dreamed up a scheme to assert greater federal control over the Internet in the name of cybersecurity. According to Reuters news agency, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, Nevada Democrat, intends to pass legislation on the subject authored by Sen. Joe Lieberman, Connecticut independent, and Sen. John D. Rockefeller IV, West Virginia Democrat. The forthcoming effort will trade the freedom of an important communications medium for the illusion of safety.

 

Mr. Lieberman's original bill grants a newly appointed White House cyberczar unprecedented powers over private companies deemed to be connected in some way to the nation's "critical infrastructure." Banks, manufacturers, information technology companies, power plants and others would be directed to comply with the relevant orders of this unelected official. "The owner or operator of covered critical infrastructure shall immediately comply with any emergency measure or action developed by the Director under this section during the pendency of any declaration by the President," S. 3480 states.

 

Companies already have a market incentive to protect their own systems from electronic attack and do not need to receive instruction from 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Yet the Washington-knows-best mentality goes beyond pushing around the chief executives of multibillion-dollar corporate empires. Even toddlers will be unable to escape indoctrination. The bill requires the secretary of education to develop curriculum standards that address "cyber safety, cybersecurity, and cyber ethics for students in kindergarten through grade 12." The bill also creates "cyber talent competitions" and cybergrants to ensure there is plenty of cyberpork to go around.

 

Last month, the Department of Homeland Security released

the latest version of its National Cyber Incident Response Plan, an acronym-laden encapsulation of all that is wrong with

entrusting computer security to the feds. It discusses, for example, the National Cyber Risk Alert Level, the online equivalent of the widely ridiculed color-coded chart that perpetually suggests a terrorist attack is just around the corner.

 

The new commander of the U.S. Cyber Command testified last week before the House Armed Services Committee, reinforcing just how ill-suited the government is to this task. "We stay prepared to defend our nation's freedom of action in cyberspace," Army Gen. Keith B. Alexander said in his prepared testimony. He then introduced his team of three- and four-star military officers, representing the Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps. The priority is to ensure that none of the branches feels left out, no matter how top-heavy the operation becomes.

 

Bureaucrats and brass are best at protecting turf and generating a steady stream of meetings, PowerPoint slides and reports. Just don't expect reduced vulnerability to attack. That's something that comes only from adapting the latest technology to the latest threats, something the civil service system is inherently incapable of doing. Because federal employees can't be fired, there is no incentive to learn the latest techniques. That's why the private sector will always do a better job of protecting itself. The private sector's freedom to hire a teenage expert stands in stark contrast to the top-down, centralized mentality promoted by the White House and Congress.

 

The only thing scarier than letting hackers take control of the Internet is letting Washington beat them to it. Government should focus on ensuring its own house is in order before presuming to dictate security standards to others.

 


 

Illinois

Federal grant means more public access

New initiative to provide more public access to outdoor recreation

SPRINGFIELD, IL – The Illinois DNR recently received notice from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) of a $525,250 federal grant to implement a new public access program for hunting and fishing.  The Illinois Recreational Access Program will begin enrolling landowners in the Illinois River and Kaskaskia River watersheds to participate in the program later this year.

 

“Hunting is declining nationwide, and here in Illinois our outdoorsmen and women need publicly accessible areas to pursue their sports – and we need places to provide the next generation safe and successful experiences to learn our outdoor heritage,” said IDNR Director Marc Miller.  “During the Illinois Conservation Congress, our constituents called for a true public access program and additional opportunities to get our youth outside.  This program will help accomplish both of those goals.”

 

The federal grant for the new Illinois Recreational Access Program (IRAP) is from the USDA Voluntary Public Access and Habitat Incentive Program.

 

The new program will include a Fishing Access Campaign targeted in the Kankakee River watershed, a Youth Turkey Hunting Campaign to be implemented with the National Wild Turkey Federation and a Large Landowner Campaign to allow access for hunting, fishing and other compatible recreational opportunities. 

IRAP will provide incentives and liability waivers to landowners who allow free public access to their properties for recreational opportunities including hunting, fishing, boating and other activities compatible with the land and water conditions. 

 

In the first year, IDNR hopes to provide access to 100 youth turkey hunting sites; two new access points for fishing, canoeing and boating on the Kankakee and Iroquois Rivers; walk-in fishing access for 200 acres of impounded water; walk-in fishing access for five miles of non-navigable streams; and access to 500 acres for youth deer hunting on large landowner properties.

 

Illinois ranks 5th in the nation in population - but only 46th for public lands available for recreation.  Approximately 80 percent of the state is farmland and around 96 percent is privately owned. 

 

“With this program we hope to complement our successful Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program and provide the state’s 323,000 hunters, 780,000 fisherman and millions of other recreational users with additional opportunities to carry on our unique outdoor heritage,” Director Miller added.

 

Program implementation will begin in Illinois this fall.  Landowners interested in the new program or more information should contact the IDNR Office of Resource Conservation at (217) 524-4111

 


IDNR Reminds Motorists be Alert for Active Deer

New Reporting Policy for Road Kill

SPRINGFIELD, IL – As the deer mating season begins, the Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) is reminding residents to be alert for moving deer and the new policy for reporting road kill deer.

 

Under the newly implemented road kill policy, individuals who wish to claim a deer killed in a vehicle collision must report the possession of road-kill deer to the IDNR through the internet or by phone. 

 

Individuals claiming road kill deer must report the possession within 24 hours using the new online IDNR Road Kill Deer Reporting Form, which can be found through this link on the department’s website:  http://dnr.state.il.us/law3/images/Road_kill.pdf.  Possession may also be reported to the IDNR by calling (217) 782-6431 no later than 4:30 p.m. on the next business day.  Individuals

involved in deer-vehicle accidents who do not want to take possession of the deer are not required to file a report with the IDNR.  

 

“We understand that some people don’t have access to a computer, but for those that do, we encourage them to make their reports via the internet.  This only takes a few minutes and can be done from the comfort of home 24 hours a day,” said IDNR Office of Law Enforcement Director Rafael Gutierrez.

 

Road kill deer may only be claimed by those individuals who are residents of Illinois, are not delinquent in child support payments and do not have their wildlife privileges suspended in any state.

 

For more information about living with white-tailed deer in Illinois, please visit http://web.extension.illinois.edu/deer/.


Indiana

Fishing workshop for educators, youth leaders at Fort Harrison State Park, Oct. 14

Fishing workshops for educators and youth leaders, called Go FishIN Crew Captain workshops, will be offered at the Natural Resources Education Center at Fort Harrison State Park, Oct. 14 and Nov. 18, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., both days.

 

The programs teach adults who who work with youth about fish biology, Indiana's aquatic ecosystems, fish management in Indiana, basic angling skills, and angler ethics.

 

Participants completing the course become “Crew Captains” and can then take the knowledge and skills to their classrooms and community. Crew Captains also can receive

 

educational materials and fishing equipment for free to use when teaching the program and taking kids fishing.  No fishing experience is needed, and no fishing license is required during the workshop. All fishing equipment will be provided. The usual gate fee will be waived.

 

The workshop is free but advance registration is required by e-mailing nrec@dnr.IN.gov or calling (317) 562-1338. For questions on the details of the workshop, e-mail Clint Kowalik (Go FishIN coordinator) at gofishin@dnr.in.gov.

---
More information on both Fort Harrison events: Clint Kowalik, DNR Go FishIN coordinator, (317) 549-0206.


Family Learn to Fish Day at Fort Harrison State Park, Oct. 16

Those interested in learning how to fish with their entire family can do so free at Fort Harrison State Park in Indianapolis, Oct. 16, starting at 9 a.m. at the park’s Natural Resources Education Center.

 

Family Learn to Fish Days are free three-hour workshops for families on the third Saturday on most months. During the program, families learn a little fish biology and some basic fishing skills. Participants then have the opportunity to practice by fishing at the park’s Delaware Lake. 

 

No experience is needed, and no fishing license is required during the workshop. All fishing equipment is provided. The usual park gate fee will be waived.

Children must be at least 6 years old. Advance registration is required by e-mailing nrec@dnr.IN.gov or calling (317) 562-1338.

 

For questions on the details of the workshop, e-mail Clint Kowalik (Go FishIN Coordinator) at gofishin@dnr.in.gov.

 

 


Indiana Deer hunters could see another big year

Hunters and non-hunters can help feed hungry Hoosiers

Back-to-back record years for Indiana deer hunters and the fact regulations are unchanged give DNR deer management biologist Chad Stewart reason to believe hunters are in for another banner year in 2010.

"I'm anticipating another top-five all-time harvest," Stewart said. "I would not be surprised if we exceeded 130,000 total deer or achieved a new record."

In 2009, hunters bagged a record 132,752 deer - 3,000 more than the previous high mark set in 2008.

Although hunters have had the opportunity to pursue deer in the urban zone season since Sept. 15, and during the youth two-day season Sept. 25 and 26, deer hunting begins in earnest when the early archery season opens statewide on Friday (Oct. 1).

"I'm anticipating a successful early archery season due to the early corn harvest," Stewart said. The early archery season accounted for 21 percent of the total harvest in 2009, or 27,818 deer.  The early archery season extends through Nov. 28. During this season, a hunter can take two deer - either an antlered and antlerless deer, or two antlerless deer - but a separate license is required for each deer taken.

Archery hunters also can purchase bonus antlerless permits designed to target female deer as a fundamental approach to controlling white-tailed deer populations. In addition to the basic bag limits, hunters can use bonus permits in any county. There is no statewide limit, but quotas are assigned to each county ranging from A to 8. Go to
www.in.gov/dnr/fishwild/files/fw-Bonus_Antlerless_Map.pdf to find a map showing bonus antlerless quotas by county.

Bonus antlerless licenses may not be used in an "A" county prior to Nov. 25.


Michigan

Kalamazoo River Immediately Above Plainwell is Re-Opened

The Department of Natural Resources and Environment today announced the reopening to the public of the Kalamazoo River immediately above Plainwell.  This stretch of the river was closed in the fall of 2009 as a public safety measure as remedial operations removed polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contaminated material from the river banks.

 

Contractors continue to work on the river banks and restore the site.  River users are asked to continue to avoid onshore

areas where equipment is operating. The DNRE reminds

area residents, though, that the Kalamazoo River from Interstate 69 west to the west end of Morrow Lake remains closed for recreation due to oil spill cleanup operations from the spill that occurred in late July.

 

“This reopening comes at just the right time for river users to enjoy fall colors from the water and to enjoy the fall hunting and fishing,” said John Lerg, DNRE wildlife biologist.  “Boaters will also be able to take advantage of a new portage around the old dam in this river reach.”


New York

Coast Guard warns of strong currents and rising water levels near Oswego River

CLEVELAND – Due to recent increase in rainfall along the Oswego and Salmon rivers, near Oswego, N.Y., the U.S. Coast Guard advises the public of the risks associated with engaging in activities near swollen rivers and streams.

 

“There have been recent cases of fishermen getting stranded and even drowning along the Oswego River,” said Petty Officer 1st Class Jadon Sprague, executive petty officer at Coast Guard Station Oswego. ”The heavy rainfall has raised the water level and has created currents that are stronger than usual.”

 

As floodwaters are dangerous and can be potentially fatal, the Coast Guard advises the public to:

► Wear a life jacket at all times when recreating along rivers. Water levels can rise fast and potentially leave people stranded on pieces of land within the river.

► Stay away from riverbanks and streams until potential flooding has passed. Do not allow children to play in flooded areas. There is a high risk of injury or drowning in areas that may appear safe.

► Carry a means of communication. Better than a mobile phone, a marine-band VHF-FM radio allows mariners to contact authorities for help in the event of an emergency.

► Stay away from moving water. Moving water only six inches deep can sweep you off your feet.

► Exit rivers immediately after hearing an alarm or siren.

► Have a plan. Notify a friend or family member of where and when you plan to enter and depart the river, just like a float plan.

► Do not try to reach your boat if it has been forced into the water and is surrounded by debris. Wait until authorities have made safe access possible.

► Do not try to board a partially sunken boat; seek professional salvage assistance

 


NY DEC Reminds Anglers of Black Bass Closure

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) reminded anglers of the upcoming mid-season closure for black sea bass fishing. Earlier this year, the state approved regulations that prohibit fishing for black sea bass from October 12 through October 31.

The 2010 black sea bass seasons and possession limits are below.

* Minimum Size: 12.5" excluding the tendril (long filament on the tail).
* Creel Limit: 25 fish
* Season Dates

► OPEN May 22 through Oct. 11.

► CLOSED Oct. 12 through Oct. 31.

► OPEN Nov. 1 through Dec. 31.
 

The shortened 2010 season affects all state and federal waters between Maine and North Carolina and is necessary to keep recreational harvest within the allowable harvest limit set by the National Marine Fisheries Service. Season dates and possession limits for the 2011 season will be established for the entire coast by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission and the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council, likely at their joint meeting in December.

For further information, contact the DEC Bureau of Marine Resources by email at
fwmarine@gw.dec.state.ny.us, by mail at 205 Belle Mead Rd., Ste. 1, E. Setauket, NY, 11733-3400, or by telephone at (631) 444-0435.


Pennsylvania

Squirrels abound in forests/woodlands

If there's one game animal that could use some additional attention in Pennsylvania, it's squirrels. Pennsylvania Game Commission field officers report squirrel populations are strong in most areas of the state.

Gray squirrels continue to be found across Pennsylvania in sizeable numbers, and the black-phase gray squirrel isn't hard to find north of Interstate-80 and east of the Ohio line all the way into the state's northcentral counties. Fox squirrels also are becoming increasingly available as they continue to push east of the Allegheny Front and north through Pennsylvania's ridges and valleys. Fox squirrels can be found as far east as the Susquehanna River.

Squirrel populations have been enjoying the benefits of declining hunting pressure and the maturation of habitat in the state for some time. These factors have spurred fox squirrel range expansion and recovery. Game Commission field officers believe squirrel hunting will be good to excellent in many of the state's forests and woodlots.

For county-specific details on game populations, habitat conditions and where-to-go hunting information, visit the Game Commission's website (
www.pgc.state.pa.us). Reports filed by Wildlife Conservation Officers, Land Managers and foresters are available from every county. To access them, just click on the "Field Officer Game Forecasts" link found on the homepage.

"Gray squirrels are our most abundant game species and are found throughout Pennsylvania," said Tom Hardisky, Pennsylvania Game Commission biologist. "Look for mast-producing trees such as walnut, butternut, oak and hickory when searching for the best hunting areas. In agricultural areas, woodlots in the vicinity of standing cornfields often support large numbers of squirrels. They can be found throughout deep woods areas. The black squirrel is actually a color phase of the gray squirrel. In general, black squirrels can be found in the northern half of Pennsylvania. Squirrels with this black color variation often occur in local concentrations scattered about their northern Pennsylvania range.

"Fox squirrels are up to 50 percent larger than gray squirrels and weigh about two pounds," Hardisky explained. "Fox squirrels have been expanding their range eastward in recent

years and now inhabit much of the western half of Pennsylvania. They prefer more open areas than gray squirrels and are not found in the deep woods. Fox squirrels
favor open fields and pastures with large trees nearby. Small woodlots and forest edges are typical fox squirrel haunts. Although some gray squirrels may possess orange coloration along their sides and tails, fox and gray squirrels do not interbreed, nor do gray and red squirrels. Each squirrel species has some color variation, even within local populations. However, this color variation largely results from genetic differences. Local diet, habitat, and climate differences also may contribute to color variation."

 

When hunting squirrels, look for large-trunked trees near a food source. Larger trees offer better protection from predators and are favorite den sites. Gray squirrels are most active during the early morning and evening, while fox squirrels often travel during mid-day.

Squirrel season opens on Oct. 16, and runs through Nov. 27. The season reopens on Dec. 13-23, and Dec. 27-Feb. 5. The daily limit is six.

Pennsylvania's youth squirrel hunt will be held Oct. 9-15, and is open to youths 12 to 16 years of age who have successfully completed a hunter-trapper education course and are properly accompanied by an adult. A hunting license is not required to participate.

Hunters also are reminded that squirrels are listed as a game animal that can be pursued by youngsters participating in the Mentored Youth Hunting Program, which permits those under the age of 12 to hunt under the guidance of a mentor. For more information about this new program, visit the Game Commission's website and click on Mentored Youth FAQs in the "Quick Clicks" box in the upper right-hand corner of the homepage.

Information on both of these youth hunting programs also can be found on page 15 of the 2010-11 Pennsylvania Digest of Hunting and Trapping Regulations, which is provided to each license buyer.

Squirrel hunters are required to wear at least 250 square inches of fluorescent orange clothing, visible 360 degrees, at all times.


Wisconsin

Walleye catch rates climb in October

MADISON -- October may just be the best time to catch ol' marble eyes: catch rates are higher than at any time during the summer, the water's less crowded, the heat and bugs are tapering off, and bugs are tapering off, and the fall colors make every trip satisfying for the soul if not the stomach.

"People are putting away the rods and turning more toward the bow and shotgun, but the hardcore anglers are actually doing pretty well right now," says Mike Vogelsang, a DNR fisheries supervisor based in Woodruff.  "About the time the leaves start falling on the water, that’s when the action heats up. It is absolutely worth it for more casual anglers to get out on the water if they want to catch walleye."

 

Vogelsang supervises fish biologists in what's one of Wisconsin's top walleye regions: the area including Vilas and Oneida counties, which between them boast more than 2,000 lakes, and Langlade, Lincoln, Forest and Florence counties, which have fewer lakes and crowds but feature the same kind of prime walleye waters.

 

"This time of year is very much like the opening weeks of the inland fishing season," Vogelsang says. "It seems like the later it gets here the better it gets." Walleye move into deep water in the summer in search of cooler water temperatures. In fall, they move up into shallow water, he says.  "This time of the year, that cooler water is up near shore," he says. "Walleye are sensing that winter is coming and they are feeding heavily on the forage fish, which are up shallow too. It's almost like they are putting on the feed bag."

 

Walleye actively feed through the winter, unlike bass, which tend to shut down. With this shore lunch favorite in close to shore, anglers stand a better chance of reeling them in, according to Tom Cichosz, a DNR fisheries biologist and treaty fisheries analyst.

 

UW-Stevens Point and DNR fisheries biologists analyzed angler surveys from 1991 to 2002 in northern Wisconsin to assess fishing pressure, catch rates and harvest rates. They found that catch rates in October were more than twice as high as in July, when most people were out fishing for walleye. Their results are presented in "Temporal Profiles of Walleye Angling Effort, Harvest Rate, and Harvest in Northern Wisconsin Lakes" (exit DNR) in the North American Journal of Fisheries Management.

 

"Walleye catch rates in October are higher than any time during the summer months," Cichosz says. "The fish go where the conditions are suitable for them to be, and in cooler conditions, that includes shallower water where they are more easily located and angled."

 

DNR fish biologists and technicians are busy conducting fall surveys, using electroshocking boats to help them capture fish to weigh and measure before returning the fish to the water. Below are fishing reports from those biologists able to respond on short notice. More information about fish populations are found in the Wisconsin Fishing Report 2010./ Look for the county listing for the water you want to fish.


New video shows Lake Michigan research vessel taking shape

MANITOWOC - A new video shows the state's new research vessel taking shape at the Burger Boat Company here, coming closer to setting sail on its mission to help keep Lake Michigan and its fisheries healthy in the 21st century.

 

The Burger Boat Company is building the 60-foot RV Coregonus, so named after the fish genus that includes lake whitefish, lake herring and bloater chubs, species that are mainstays of the Lake Michigan fishery.  The boat will replace the RV Barney Devine, which was built by the same company in 1937, and which has served the Wisconsin DNR and its predecessor agency on Lake Michigan for more than 70 years.

 

Although the RV Barney Devine has been well maintained, the vessel has become technologically obsolete and the maintenance expense is expected to increase dramatically, according to Paul Peeters, DNR fisheries supervisor at Sturgeon Bay, where the vessel will be docked.

 

So Peeters and Brandon Bastar, the DNR fisheries technician

who will captain the boat, worked closely with SeaCraft Design in Sturgeon Bay to develop a design for the RV Coregonus that would maintain the ability to use gill nets but also expand abilities to include more types of fisheries and limnological sampling gear.

 

The RV Barney Devine has typically conducted Lake Michigan gill net surveys from early May through the end of December to help DNR estimate populations of lake trout and burbot, as well as seasonal gill net surveys for juvenile lake whitefish, spawning lake whitefish, yellow perch, and bloater chubs. In recent years the RV Barney Devine has also been used to conduct gill net surveys for chinook salmon and as a platform for other fisheries or limnological research with other DNR bureaus and agencies.

 

The $1,995,500 in funding for the vessel will come primarily from license revenues placed in the segregated fisheries account, with an additional $500,000 provided from salmon stamp revenues, Peeters says.

 


Canada

Canada launches comprehensive, basin-wide, bi-national Asian carp risk assessment

Announces Proactive Action Plan to Protect the Great Lakes from Asian Carp

Great Lakes Fishery Commission Lauds Canada’s Plan to assess risk of Asian Carp

Toronto, Ontario – Canada’s Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, Gail She, has announced that the Government of Canada has begun proactive work under a new Action Plan to combat the threat posed by invasive Asian carp to the Great Lakes and its tributaries.  “Our Government understands the value of the Great Lakes fishery to Ontarians and Canadians, and we are taking proactive, targeted action to ensure that this unique freshwater resource is protected for the benefit of future generations,” said Minister Shea.

 

The Government of Canada is launching the comprehensive, basin-wide, bi-national Asian carp risk assessment that will take approximately 18 months to complete. The risk assessment will be conducted jointly between scientists in Canada and the United States; the Great Lakes Fishery Commission will facilitate the project.  This risk assessment will be the first binational effort to evaluate the likelihood of Asian carps spreading throughout the Great Lakes basin and to gauge the potential effect of the species on the Great Lakes ecosystem. The assessment will involve preeminent scientists in the field, will be peer-reviewed, and should take about eighteen months to complete.

 

We are not taking the threat to the Great Lakes lightly," Becky Cudmore, senior research scientist for Fisheries and Oceans Canada, told us. An expert on aquatic risk assessment, Ms. Cudmore is Senior Science Advisor for Aquatic Invasive Species and will be heading up the team of bi-national experts on this project.  The work will pinpoint key areas within the Great Lakes basin most vulnerable to invasion and identify likely routes where they could enter the Canadian side of the lake system.

 

The Asian carp has been found in the Mississippi River system in the U.S. and could eventually enter the Great Lakes, where it would be very difficult to control their spread to other lakes and beyond. Asian carp aggressively compete with native fishes for food and habitat and quickly become the dominant species. This could have a significant negative impact on the natural biodiversity of freshwater ecosystems.

 

The results of the project will help to identify potential habitat and spawning locations for Asian carp, and transfer routes to help guide prevention, monitoring, rapid response, and control

efforts by authorities on both sides of the border. By gaining a

greater understanding of the potential spread, population numbers and specific impacts of Asian carp, the Government will be prepared to take immediate, effective actions against any emerging threats to Canadian waters.

 

The United States Government welcomed the announcement, which reaffirms the Government of Canada’s ongoing commitment to practical and constructive cross-border engagement to protect shared freshwater ecosystems. “The United States Government is pleased that Canada is making this important contribution to help address the threats posed by Asian carp in the Great Lakes,” said David Jacobson, U.S. Ambassador to Canada. “These efforts will supplement the work underway by the United States to implement our Asian Carp Control Strategy Framework and Action Plan," added Mr. Jacobson.”

 

“Protecting the Great Lakes from Asian carp is critical to the United States and we welcome this collaborative action from the Canadian Government,” added John Goss, Director of Asian Carp at the White House Council on Environmental Quality. “Joint efforts between the United States and Canadian Governments will further the aggressive response to prevent this invasive species from establishing itself in the Great Lakes.”

 

“The Great Lakes Fishery Commission commends Canada for launching this initiative to better understand the potential for Asian carps to spread throughout the Great Lakes ecosystem,” said David Ullrich, the commission’s U.S. Section Chair.  “With this risk assessment, we will have a vastly improved understanding about where Asian carps might establish a population within the basin, as well as important information about the probable impact of Asian carps on the fishery and environment, should they enter the lakes.”

 

The Government of Canada has allocated approximately $415,000 over the next two years to fund this project, with an additional in-kind contribution from the Great Lakes Fishery Commission (GLFC). This funding is in addition to the $4 million invested through Budget 2010 to support the Department’s national Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) program.

 

The Great Lakes contain 20 percent of the world’s above-ground freshwater. The combined annual value of the commercial and recreational fisheries in lakes Superior, Huron, Michigan, Erie and Ontario is estimated to be $7 billion.


Other Breaking News Items

(Click on title or URL to read full article)

 

EDITORIAL: Study carp, but keep them out of lakes
Canadian and U.S. scientists will study whether Asian carp are liable to invade the Great Lakes and destroy the fish populations. The 18-month study will begin as the carp threaten to enter Lake Michigan through rivers and canals in and around Chicago.

 

Panel wants options for raising Great Lakes levels
The U.S. and Canadian board that oversees Great Lakes issues has rejected a recommendation from a group of scientists to just learn to live with artificially low water levels caused by dredging on the St. Clair River near Detroit.

 

EDITORIAL: Where's the urgency?
Congress and the Obama administration should get serious about taking tougher measures to keep invasive species out of the Great Lakes.

 

Wet September brings Lake Superior up
The level of Lake Superior rose a half-inch in September, a month the big lake usually goes down a half-inch, according to the International Lake Superior Board of Control.

 

Lake Huron’s future explored
The Southern Lake Huron Assessment Effort continued to chart a vibrant future for the Thumb Area Friday, as a number of stakeholders gathered to explore economic, development and planning opportunities that could help the area adapt to the changing economy.

Local salmon research may help western fish populations
A researcher studying the fish said this weekend that he hopes salmon stocking lessons learned in Ontario may help revive threatened salmon populations in British Columbia rivers.

Canada commissions study to curb Asian carp
The fight against what's been called the greatest threat to the Great Lakes will see Canadian scientists join with their American counterparts to take on the Asian carp.

 

Ohio Supreme Court to decide Lake Erie boundaries
After more than 200 years of statehood, Ohio is hammering out Lake Erie’s official boundary in the wake of an already 6-year-old lawsuit filed in the name of all lakefront property owners.

 

Seaway fell far short of expectations
Undersized, underused and under fire for unleashing an onslaught of devastating biological pollution into the Great Lakes, the Seaway could reverse its declining relevance if it were to reposition itself as a modern nautical highway to move goods regionally.

 

Grand Haven to launch second phase of municipal marina improvements

Grand Haven is planning more improvements to its municipal marina. The $994,125 project will be 50 % funded by the state and the remaining half by the city's marina fund.  This is the second such grant Grand Haven has received. The first was for $507,500

 

An open front door to invaders in Great Lakes

It is still basically business-as-usual on the St. Lawrence Seaway. Biologists say the artificial shipping link between the Great Lakes and Atlantic Ocean has already wrought more damage than the carp might ever do. And they worry about what might be coming in next, even as the drama to shut the back door plays out in a Chicago federal courtroom and as the Obama administration touts its new Asian carp czar.

 

 

The opinions expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the GLSFC, its officers or staff. 

Reproduction of any material by paid-up members of the GLSFC is encouraged but appropriate credit must be given. 

Reproduction by others without written permission is prohibited.

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