Week of November 23, 2009

World
Misc New Fishing-Boating Products
Hunting & Shooting Products/Issues
National

Regional

Veterans Issues
General
Indiana
Michigan
New York
Other Breaking News Items
  • Beware the Climate Change Alarmists

    In the next few weeks we'll be relentlessly scrubbed with eyewash, brainwash and hogwash, all designed to cleanse us of any doubts that global warming is a proven menace. First, there's the Democratic global warming legislation rushing through Congress, second, the rush to pass the legislation is fueled by the upcoming United Nations meeting on global warming

     

  • The union that hates the Boy Scouts

    The Boy Scouts' motto is: Be prepared. Who knew it meant preparing to de fend themselves against union thuggery? Kids, pay attention: This is a teachable moment for all of you on power, politics and Big Labor's culture of corruption.

 

       Weekly News Archives

                         or

       New Product  Archives

 

World

Eighty-Year-Old Mistake may be leading to First Species to be fished to Extinction

France, November, 2009 -- A species of common skate is set to become the first marine fish species to be driven to extinction by commercial fishing, due to an error of species classification 80 years ago, reveals research published today in the journal Aquatic Conservation.

 

The European common skate, Dipturus batis, has been on the World Conservation Union’s Red List of Threatened Species since 2006, with France currently being responsible for 60.2% of reported landings. These catches are predominantly registered under the name ‘D.batis,’ however researchers, led by Dr Samuel Iglésias, show that ‘D. batis’ is in fact two clearly distinct species which have been incorrectly categorised as one since the 1920s. 

 

From the mid-19th century the common skate was described as two distinct species, the flapper skate, D. intermedia, and the blue skate, D. flossada. However, in an influential work in 1926 R.S Clark recognised only ‘D. batis’ as a valid species and this classification has largely gone unchallenged since. 

 

This classification confusion has resulted in the depletion of the flapper skate, the more endangered species of the two, being masked in the catch record. This means the risk of extinction is far higher than previously assessed and without immediate and incisive action the species may be in an irreversible decline towards extinction.

When conducting sampling in fish markets during the start of this study Dr Iglésias observed noticeable morphological differences in the ‘Dipturus batis’ specimens he sampled. In order to understand these differences the researchers not only analysed the systematic molecular data but also reviewed the species’ life history and analysed fishery statistics.

 

“As the species was listed as ‘Critically endangered’ I wanted to understand who's who? I estimated at the beginning that it would take some weeks to resolve this question, but in the end it took me about two years,” said Iglésias. “Our research clearly shows that D. cf. flossada and D. cf. intermedia are distinct and should be resurrected as two valid species.”

 

Common Skates, which were once abundant in British and European waters, have been in sharp decline for decades. In 2008 the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea(ICES) noted that the species is depleted in the Celtic and North Seas, the Skagerrak and the English Channel. The ICES advised no target fishing and that by-catch should be minimised.

 

“The threat of extinction for European Dipturus together with mislabelling in fishery statistics highlight the need for a huge reassessment of population for the different Dipturus species in European waters,” concluded Iglésias. “Without revision and recognition of its distinct status the world’s largest skate, D. cf. intermedia, could soon be rendered extinct.”


Misc New Fishing-Boating Products

Tournament-Winning Lures to Support Future Fisherman Foundation

Just in time for Christmas, www.Lurenet.com, makers of Smithwick, Heddon, Bomber, Creek Chub Rebel and a host of other well known brands, is offering a three-pack of popular tournament-winning lures for less than half price. And to make this offer even sweeter, you have the satisfaction of knowing that $1 from every sale goes to support Future Fisherman Foundation youth angling programs like Hooked On Fishing Not On Drugs and Physh Ed

 

For less than $10, anglers get an XCalibur Zell Pop, a Bomber 4A crankbait and a Booyah Ajig, in the color patterns that won national tournaments, as well as the satisfaction that $1 from each order goes to benefit the Future Fisherman Foundation, which administers the Hooked On Fishing Not On Drugs, Physh Ed and Boys & Girls Club’s C.A.T.C.H. fishing programs.

 

The Future Fisherman Foundation (F3) recently lost its funding and it’s up to companies like Lurenet.com and Plano Tackle Boxes and you the angler to keep these programs going. These programs reach youngsters by working through the school systems, much like the anti-fishing crowd, which, you can bet, have deep pockets and will do whatever they can to

 

brainwash our youth into believing that our way of life is wrong.

We must counterattack and the F3 is our front-line army.

 

“Since its inception in 1986, the Future Fisherman Foundation has provided fishing education programs for more than 1 million children nationwide,” said F3 executive director Keith Sutton. “This wouldn’t be possible, however, without the generous support of companies like Lurenet.com and the customers who buy their products. The 3-pack of tournament-winning lures is a win-win deal for everyone. The consumer gets a great deal on some great bass lures, plus the satisfaction of knowing their purchase supports programs that lead to a life-long love of fishing in our children. We’re proud to have Lurenet.com and Lurenet as partners.”

 

The foundation of this Tournament-Winning 3-Pack is the jig Alton Jones used to win the 2008 Bassmaster Classic on Lake Hartwell, the Booyah A-Jig in Ozark Craw color pattern. Add in the Bomber Model 4A in Foxy Shad Terry Butcher used to win the 2008 Bassmaster Open Southern Division on Lake Texoma, and top it off with the XCalibur Zell Pop in Bone/Chartreuse Chad Griffin used to win the 2009 BASS Elite event at Lake Oneida. Three baits that proved to be go-to lures when big money was on the line.  For more information or to order a Tournament-Winning 3-Pack, go to www.lurenet.com.


Hunting & Shooting Products/Issues

Sightmark Introduces Ultra-Shot Reflex Sight

For application on either shotguns or rifles in either hunting or tactical applications, Sightmark introduces the Ultra Shot Reflex Sight, offering a unique Interlok internal locking system, four different reticle patterns and the capabilities to handle recoil op to a .50 caliber gun.

 

The Sightmark Ultra Shot is one of the most versatile reflex sights on the market. It was designed to be lightweight (only 5.3 oz.) and deadly accurate. Some sights lack a locking system, and others have a manual lock down system that requires the user to readjust multiple times during sighting because the sight has moved from zero.

 

The Sightmark Ultra Shot has a unique Interlok internal locking system that automatically  locks into place as adjustments are made. The shooter has the ability to choose between four different reticle patterns, and the Ultra Shot is able to withstand recoil up to a .50 caliber gun. With features like adjustable reticle brightness, parallax correction, and unlimited eye relief, every marksman will want this reflex sight in their arsenal. Accessories include a Limited Lifetime Warranty and adjustment tools to facilitate sighting. For precision accuracy, the Sightmark Ultra Shot Sight is literally in a class by itself. 

 

About $ 99.99     www.sightmark.com 

 

 


Swarovski El Swarovision 42 Series

SWAROVSKI OPTIK announces the new EL 42 binoculars with SWAROVISION technology specially developed for greater viewing comfort, especially for eyeglass wearers. Using field flattener lens, which helps to create a true image, it is possible to produce diamond-bright image resolution right up to the very edge of the field of view ensuring the finest detail without any edge distortion.

 

HD lenses minimize color fringing (chromatic aberration) and guarantee razor-sharp images with the highest possible resolution. The EL Swarovision 42 provides improved viewing comfort, and enables users to enjoy the entire wide-angle field of view and the new EL 42's unique edge sharpness. The sturdy, removable twist-in eyecups have been designed with an intermediate stage making it easier to adapt the individual distance between the ocular lens and eye. The new focusing

 

wheel made from hard and soft components is non-slip, sturdy, easily and accurately operated. It is possible to change the setting from the close focus to infinity very quickly with only two complete turns. This unrivalled close range is particularly beneficial for the macro observation world.

 

The time-tested and elegant EL design with wrap-around grip has also been optimized. Thanks to their rubber armouring, the binoculars are pleasantly easy to handle even when cold and the ergonomic thumb rests ensure a perfectly balanced observation. The practical accessories are yet another plus in terms of functionality. All new EL 42’s are supplied with a water-repellent functional bag, an easily adjustable Lift carrying strap, protective caps for eyepieces and objectives plus the Snap Shot adapter. The latter is used to quickly connect a digital compact camera to the binocular for remarkable photographs taken at long distance.

www.swarovskioptik.com


LaserLyte Expands Rear Sight Laser Line for Springfield Pistols

Cottonwood, Ariz. – LaserLyte announces the expansion of its Rear Sight Laser (RSL) line for Springfield Armory XD and XD(M)™ pistols. The LaserLyte RSL’s ground-breaking new laser design incorporated into the rear sight, compact size and revolutionary performance make it the most extraordinary system LaserLyte has ever produced. Easy-to-install and easy-to-operate, the new RSL offers a high-power laser with the benefit of not having to replace existing grips, internal stock parts or holsters.

 

 

The RSL’s activation switch is a strategically placed button at the back of the slide that is easily activated by the thumb in a normal shooting position for left- or right-handed shooters. First press of the activation switch produces the constant on mode, second press produces pulse mode, and third press deactivates the laser. A small LED on the back of the laser indicates if the laser is on and what mode it is in.

 

This RSL fits all Springfield Armory XD and XD(M) as well as

 

SIG SAUER 225, 226, 228, 239 and 209 pistols. The unit is constructed from MIM 4650, nickel enriched high carbon steel, the same material used for most heavy-duty gun parts such as iron sights, hammers and levers. It is also black oxide, bead blasted for a non-reflective finish. When mounted onto the pistol the RSL will fit all Level I and II holsters.  The RSL is powered by four 377 batteries, commonly used in watches provide one hour of run time on constant on and two hours in pulse mode. LaserLyte offers discounted batteries at www.laserlyte.com.

 

Specifications:

- Product #: RL-XD/XDM

   Fits all Springfield Armory XD/XD(M) and SIG SAUER 225,  226, 228, 239 and 209 pistols

- Power Output: Class IIIA, 5mw

- Laser module: 650nm

- Batteries: 4-377

- Battery Life: 1 hr constant on, 2 hrs in pulse mode

- Weight: 1.2 oz., 34.02 g

- Length: .85 in., 21.59 mm

- Width: 1.05 in., 26.67 mm

- Height: .35 in., 8.89 mm

- Range at Night: 500 yd., 457.2 m

 

About $199.95


Mastiff Rights 24-year-old Video Game Wrong

Includes Genuinely Helpful Hunting Dog in

Remington Great American Bird Hunt for Wii™

SAN FRANCISCO - Nov. 18, 2009 - After more than two decades of being mocked by man's best friend, gamers across the country are discovering the joy of hunting with a truly helpful dog in Remington Great American Bird Hunt for Wii™

Rockford, the friendly Labrador retriever in Remington Great American Bird Hunt, not only refrains from laughing at hunters who aren't having the best day, he lends a helping paw. When called with a special power-up, Rockford races off into the brush to flush flocks of bonus birds into range.  Remington Great American Bird Hunt is now available at retail locations nationwide. For more information, visit the official Web site at http://www.remingtonbirdhunt.com .


PA - Game Commission in USMC's Toys for Tots Program

HARRISBURG -- The Pennsylvania Game Commission is again participating in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserves' "Toys for Tots" program by opening the doors of the Game Commission's Harrisburg headquarters to serve as a drop-off collection site. The Game Commission's office is at 2001 Elmerton Avenue in Susquehanna Township, just off of Progress Avenue. (For those using mapping devices, the

 

mailing address is Harrisburg, PA 17110-9797.) Donations will be accepted until noon on Friday, Dec. 11, at which time all items will be taken to the USMC's central collection facility for distribution to area children.

 

In addition to serving as a collection point for the program, for the third year, the agency was donating stuff black bears to the Toys for Tots program.


PA - Countdown to Deer Season Has Begun

HARRISBURG – The state’s biggest draw for hunters is set to begin November 30, according to the Pennsylvania Game Commission Executive Director Carl G. Roe, when the two-week firearms deer season opens.

 

“Fluorescent orange and camouflage clothing soon will be in fashion across the Commonwealth, and cars parked on the shoulders of roads that cut through forested areas or farming communities will be a common sight,” Roe said. “Deer season has a dramatic effect on the Pennsylvania; it provides hundreds of thousands of hunters a chance to put venison in the freezer, as well as stimulates a multi-million dollar economic surge that local businesses rely on.

 

For the second year, deer season will open with a five-day, antlered deer-only season in Wildlife Management Units (WMUs) 2D, 2G, 3C and 4B, from Nov. 30-Dec. 4. It is followed immediately in these four WMUs by seven days of concurrent,

antlered and antlerless deer hunting beginning Dec. 5 and

continuing through Dec.12. The rest of the state follows the two-week concurrent, antlered and antlerless season – Nov. 30-Dec. 12 – that has been in place since 2001.

 

The Game Commission will use a four-year study to determine the impact and effectiveness of the five-day antlered/seven-day concurrent season before additional WMUs may be considered for this season configuration. It also will assess hunter satisfaction with the modified season structure in the four WMUs.

 

Hunters must wear 250 square inches of fluorescent orange material on the head, chest and back combined at all times while afield during the seasons. They also are advised that it’s illegal to hunt, chase or disturb deer within 150 yards of any occupied building without the occupant's permission if they are using a firearm, or 50 yards if they are using a bow or crossbow.


WI - Deer Donation program enters 10th year

More than 3.1 million pounds of venison distributed

MADISON – This year marks the 10th anniversary of Wisconsin’s Venison Donation Program. In ten years hunters have made a tremendous positive impact on the lives of thousands of families through the Venison Donation Program -- distributing more than 3.1 million pounds of ground venison from nearly 70,000 deer donated by hunters, processed by participating meat processors and distributed by volunteers to state food pantries.

 

This year, 131 processors are participating in the program at a time when perhaps more families than ever might be looking for help with the grocery bill.  “If you have the chance out there this year, think about donating a deer,” says Department of Natural Resources Secretary Matt Frank.

 

Participating processors will be displaying a new sign in their businesses this year, designed by Madison graphic designer Tom Senatori, identifying them as drop-off and processing

 

locations for this program. Hunters dropping off a deer will receive a matching sticker designed by DNR Wisconsin Deer Donation Coordinator Laurie Fike that they can attach to a vehicle, gun case or anywhere else identifying them as providers of high quality food to needy families.  Even the Green Bay Packers are contributing to stopping hunger through their “Hunt Down Hunger” program.

 

Wisconsin’s Venison Donation Program is a partnership between local charitable organizations, counties, the Department of Natural Resources, meat processors and hunters. This effort has provided high quality protein to thousands of families over the years. In addition to donating deer to the program, since 2002 hunters have chipped in an additional $123,000 to the pantry program on top of the fee they pay for deer harvest permits.

 

A list of participating meat processors, is available on the DNR Web site and is searchable by county.


NYDEC sets Southern Zone Deer and Catskill Bear Hunting Seasons

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Pete Grannis announces that the 2009 regular deer hunting season opens at sunrise on Saturday, November 21, in New York's Southern Zone. Regular bear hunting season in the southeastern portion of the Southern Bear Range also begins on Nov. 21, while regular bear season in the central-western portion of the Southern Bear Range begins Nov. 28.

 

These big game hunting seasons close at sunset on Sunday, Dec. 13. See the 2009-10 New York Hunting and Trapping Regulations Guide or www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/28602.html for a map illustrating the specific boundaries and season dates for the Southern Bear Range.

 

Late Archery and Muzzleloading seasons for deer and bear in the Southern Zone open at sunrise on Dec. 14 and close at sunset on Dec. 22. Hunters taking part in these special seasons must possess either bowhunting or muzzleloading privileges. During the late special seasons, hunters may use either of their bowhunting and muzzleloading tags, and may also take a deer with an unused regular season deer tag.

 

Unused Deer Management Permits (DMPs) may also be used in the late seasons for antlerless deer in the unit for which they were issued.

 

In the Northern Zone, the regular deer and bear hunting season opened Oct. 24 and will close Dec. 6. This zone generally includes the Adirondacks, the Tug Hill Plateau, the Eastern Lake Ontario Plain and the Champlain and St. Lawrence Valleys. A late muzzleloading season for deer will be open in portions of the Northern Zone from Dec. 7 to Dec. 13.

 

Remember to wear Hunter Orange.

Although safety-conscious hunters have significantly reduced the number of firearms-related injuries, studies show that individuals wearing hunter orange clothing are seven times less likely to be injured than hunters who do not wear the bright fluorescent color. During big game hunting season, people who wear hunter orange are 16 times less likely to be the victim of a visibility-related mishap, and 23 times less likely to be killed in such an incident. For more hunting tips, visit the DEC webpage "Hunting Safety" at www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/9186.html.


Ohio's Deer-Gun Season Opens November 30

COLUMBUS, OHIO - Ohio's popular deer-gun season opens statewide on Monday, November 30, offering hunters a full week to harvest a whitetail. The upcoming season will again include an extra weekend of gun hunting on December 19-20, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources.

 

Deer can be hunted with a legal muzzleloader, handgun or shotgun from one half-hour before sunrise to sunset through December 6 and December 19-20. With a pre-hunting season population estimate of 650,000 white-tailed deer, the ODNR Division of Wildlife anticipates 115,000 to 125,000 deer will be killed during the nine-day season. Approximately 420,000 hunters are expected to participate in this year's season, including many out-of-state hunters.

 

The white-tailed deer is the most popular game animal in Ohio, frequently pursued by generations of hunters. Ohio ranks 8th nationally in annual hunting-related sales and 10th in the number of jobs associated with the hunting-related industry. Each year, hunting has a $859 million economic impact in Ohio through the sale of equipment, fuel, food, lodging and more.

Those hunting in urban units and at Division of Wildlife-authorized controlled hunts will have a six-deer bag limit, and those deer will not count against the hunter's zone bag limit. Antlerless deer permits can be used for the entire season in urban deer units or Division of Wildlife-authorized controlled hunts. Antlerless deer permits must be purchased by November 29.

 

Hunters may take only one antlered deer, regardless of zone, hunting method or season. A deer permit is required in addition to a valid Ohio hunting license.

 

Hunters are encouraged to kill more does this season using the reduced-priced antlerless deer permit and donate any extra venison to organizations assisting Ohioans in need. The Division is collaborating with Farmers and Hunters Feeding the Hungry to help pay for the processing of donated venison. Hunters who donate their deer are not required to pay the processing cost as long as the deer are taken to a participating processor. Counties being served by this program can be found online at fhfh.org.

 


 

National

Asian Carp may have breeched the Electronic Barrier

Multiple Carp DNA samplings have been found in multiple locations North and East near O’Brien Lock

During a press conference call held Friday morning, November 20, it was confirmed that multiple samples of carp DNA have been found substantially north and east of the existing carp barrier, and in another water body that has a direct connection to Lake Michigan.

 

Common maps, (shown below) reflect that direct connection, which includes the Calumet and Little Calumet Rivers and Calumet Harbor.  

 

Map #1 – "Calumet River Waterway" shows the location of: Calumet Harbor entrance, Calumet Harbor and the O’Brien Lock as they relate to each other.

 

Map # 2 - "O’Brien Lock & Dam" shows its location

 

During the conference call, facilitated by the USEPA, there was a comment made that the O’Brien Lock is the only existing barrier remaining to prevent further migration of Asian carp into Lake Michigan. The O’Brien Lock is not a barrier; it is only an impediment to slow down carp migration. Unless the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers commits to keeping that lock closed until an Interagency Task Force is assured no carp are in the area, Asian Carp will get into Lake Michigan.   Common maps show irrefutable evidence there is a direct connection between the location of confirmed carp DNA evidence (1-3 miles below O’Brien Lock) and the short distance of six river miles to Calumet Harbor and the opening to Lake Michigan. 

 

Again, The O’Brien lock is only an impediment – unless the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers keeps it closed permanently, or until the area is electro-shocked and subsequently treated with Rotenone, creating a fish-free-zone.

 

In view of this new and startling announcement, it was asked would the existing plan be modified to initially electroshock the area around O’Brien then subsequently treat it with Rotenone.  Ill DNR deputy director John Rogner emphasized all options were open to the Interagency Task Force. They were charged with putting together the present plan of shutting down all shipping and treating the immediate area around the barrier for scheduled barrier maintenance. They do plan to go ahead with those present plans to shut down the barrier on December 2.

 

Rogner reiterated the inter-agency task force will be taking a hard look at the new evidence and considering further options including electro-shocking and further treatment of Rotenone

in these other riverway stretches; however he would not commit to a specific date or timeline.  Ironically, the need for more Rotenone may require the Task Force to research availability in Europe, since most all North American sources will have been exhausted.

 

The most pressing problem is the short distance between the O’Brien Lock on the Calumet River and Calumet Harbor just six short river miles from the O’Brien Lock. “Several positive Carp DNA samples were found 1-3 miles below the O’Brien Lock"  according to Army Corps regional Commander Maj. General John Peabody.

 

Peabody added “Notre Dame field personnel found one positive DNA sample in the Des Plaines River and three at the confluence of the Cal-Sag Channel and the Sanitary Ship Canal.” That area is approximately 10-12 miles north of the existing barrier. Peabody’s reference to the Corp increasing the barrier voltage from 1 to 2” on August 17 evidently either wasn’t sufficient to prevent carp migration through the barrier or the Corp’s efforts were too little too late.

 

The Corps, and the U.S. Congress, must ultimately be held responsible and/or culpable for this latest and most grave threat to the nation’s Great Lakes.  

 

Agencies on the press conference call included USEPA (Cameron Davis, Sr. Advisor to USEPA), USFWS (Charlie Wooley, Region 3 Deputy Director), USACE (Gen. John Peabody, GL Regional Commander and Col Vince Quarles, Chicago Dist Cdr), USCG (Rear Adm. John Neffinger  Dist 9 Cdr), IL DNR (Deputy Director John Rogner) and Dr David Lodge, Research director U. of Notre Dame.

 

Lodge informed us approximately 43 DNA samples were taken between Sept 23 and Oct 1 by University of Notre Dame researchers, and at least 29 samples proved positive. Lodge also said process time of these samples takes 14 days, which means that positive information was available to the US Corps of Engineers on or shortly after Oct 15.

 

There were at least 4 various barrier committee or sub-committee meetings and two conference calls held between Oct 15 and November 20, affecting hundreds of vitally interested parties, agencies and businesses,  yet this information was not made available to anybody until November 20.

 

Why? Why the delay? And why the obvious lack of a sense of urgency by federal authorities and Congressional legislators?

 

There will be more comprehensive reports and related information in our November newsletter, due shortly.

 

Dan Thomas, President

Great Lakes Sport Fishing Council

 


International outflow plan stays

The International St. Lawrence River Board of Control has announced it will leave the current outflow release plan in place for Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River. The board advised it may adjust releases, depending on "downstream conditions, to facilitate ice formation, and to meet critical hydropower and navigation needs." The supply of water into

Lake Ontario has been below average, the board says, which resulted in a "sharp" decrease in water levels, though that level, currently 74.56 metres, is actually at the long-term average for Lake Ontario and similar to levels at this time last year. Meanwhile, levels in the St. Lawrence were generally above average this past summer, but fell below average at the end of August, the board reported.


Regional

Asian Carp may have breeched the Electronic Barrier

Multiple Carp DNA samplings have been found in multiple locations North and East near O’Brien Lock

During a press conference call held Friday morning, November 20, it was confirmed that multiple samples of carp DNA have been found substantially north and east of the existing carp barrier, and in another water body that has a direct connection to Lake Michigan.

 

Common maps, (shown below) reflect that direct connection, which includes the Calumet and Little Calumet Rivers and Calumet Harbor.  

 

Map #1 – "Calumet River Waterway" shows the location of: Calumet Harbor entrance, Calumet Harbor and the O’Brien Lock as they relate to each other.

 

Map # 2 - "O’Brien Lock & Dam" shows its location

 

During the conference call, facilitated by the USEPA, there was a comment made that the O’Brien Lock is the only existing barrier remaining to prevent further migration of Asian carp into Lake Michigan. The O’Brien Lock is not a barrier; it is only an impediment to slow down carp migration. Unless the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers commits to keeping that lock closed until an Interagency Task Force is assured no carp are in the area, Asian Carp will get into Lake Michigan.   Common maps show irrefutable evidence there is a direct connection between the location of confirmed carp DNA evidence (1-3 miles below O’Brien Lock) and the short distance of six river miles to Calumet Harbor and the opening to Lake Michigan. 

 

Again, The O’Brien lock is only an impediment – unless the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers keeps it closed permanently, or until the area is electro-shocked and subsequently treated with Rotenone, creating a fish-free-zone.

 

In view of this new and startling announcement, it was asked would the existing plan be modified to initially electroshock the area around O’Brien then subsequently treat it with Rotenone.  Ill DNR deputy director John Rogner emphasized all options were open to the Interagency Task Force. They were charged with putting together the present plan of shutting down all shipping and treating the immediate area around the barrier for scheduled barrier maintenance. They do plan to go ahead with those present plans to shut down the barrier on December 2.

 

Rogner reiterated the inter-agency task force will be taking a hard look at the new evidence and considering further options including electro-shocking and further treatment of Rotenone

in these other riverway stretches; however he would not commit to a specific date or timeline.  Ironically, the need for more Rotenone may require the Task Force to research availability in Europe, since most all North American sources will have been exhausted.

 

The most pressing problem is the short distance between the O’Brien Lock on the Calumet River and Calumet Harbor just six short river miles from the O’Brien Lock. “Several positive Carp DNA samples were found 1-3 miles below the O’Brien Lock"  according to Army Corps regional Commander Maj. General John Peabody.

 

Peabody added “Notre Dame field personnel found one positive DNA sample in the Des Plaines River and three at the confluence of the Cal-Sag Channel and the Sanitary Ship Canal.” That area is approximately 10-12 miles north of the existing barrier. Peabody’s reference to the Corp increasing the barrier voltage from 1 to 2” on August 17 evidently either wasn’t sufficient to prevent carp migration through the barrier or the Corp’s efforts were too little too late.

 

The Corps, and the U.S. Congress, must ultimately be held responsible and/or culpable for this latest and most grave threat to the nation’s Great Lakes.  

 

Agencies on the press conference call included USEPA (Cameron Davis, Sr. Advisor to USEPA), USFWS (Charlie Wooley, Region 3 Deputy Director), USACE (Gen. John Peabody, GL Regional Commander and Col Vince Quarles, Chicago Dist Cdr), USCG (Rear Adm. John Neffinger  Dist 9 Cdr), IL DNR (Deputy Director John Rogner) and Dr David Lodge, Research director U. of Notre Dame.

 

Lodge informed us approximately 43 DNA samples were taken between Sept 23 and Oct 1 by University of Notre Dame researchers, and at least 29 samples proved positive. Lodge also said process time of these samples takes 14 days, which means that positive information was available to the US Corps of Engineers on or shortly after Oct 15.

 

There were at least 4 various barrier committee or sub-committee meetings and two conference calls held between Oct 15 and November 20, affecting hundreds of vitally interested parties, agencies and businesses,  yet this information was not made available to anybody until November 20.

 

Why? Why the delay? And why the obvious lack of a sense of urgency by federal authorities and Congressional legislators?

 

There will be more comprehensive reports and related information in our November newsletter, due shortly.

 

Dan Thomas, President

Great Lakes Sport Fishing Council

 


Chicago Sanitary/Ship Canal to Close Dec 2 for Fish Barrier Maintenance

Rotenone to be used to prevent Asian carp from moving into Lake Michigan

Barrier area will be closed to all traffic for 4-5 days

CHICAGO – A section of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) is planned to be closed to all traffic, weather permitting, beginning December 2 for a period of four to five days.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is planning to perform scheduled maintenance on Barrier IIA, one of two electric barriers in operation on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal constructed to prevent the movement of the destructive Asian carp into Lake Michigan and the Great Lakes. Performing scheduled maintenance is required in order to maintain reliability of the structures and minimize the risk of unplanned outages due to inadequate maintenance.

During the maintenance shutdown, Barrier I will remain active. However, because of late summer detection of Asian carp near the barrier system and concern that Barrier I may not be effective in deterring juvenile fish, rotenone will be applied to the canal between the barrier and the Lockport Lock and Dam, a section approximately 5 miles long.  The application will allow for the removal of Asian carp and other fish to keep them from advancing past the barrier toward Lake Michigan.  Illinois EPA water quality experts will be monitoring downstream of the application zone to ensure that the waters of the state are protected, and the chemicals do not move beyond the designated application area.

 

“The barrier is currently the only protection against Asian carp for the Great Lakes and the maintenance shutdown may present an opportunity for the destructive fish to advance up the canal toward Lake Michigan,” said DNR Assistant Director John Rogner.

 

During this process, the U.S. Coast Guard will be enforcing a safety zone and the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) will be closed to all commercial and recreational vessel traffic between CSSC Mile marker 291 and CSSC Mile Marker 298.  The waterway is planned to be closed beginning December 2 and last for the duration of operations.  The waterway will reopen as soon as operations permit.

 

Asian carp have been detected using environmental DNA testing in the canal below the barrier, and there is consensus among federal, state, and local agencies along with other partners that actions must be taken to prevent these invasive species from reaching Lake Michigan while Barrier IIA is shut down.

 

The Illinois DNR), in coordination with the multi-agency Asian 

 

Carp Rapid Response Workgroup along with the Great Lakes Interagency Task Force, will manage the application of rotenone in the CSSC.  While the toxicant will eradicate Asian carp and other fish in the canal, rotenone does not present a risk to people or other wildlife when used properly.

 

The application of rotenone is planned for December 3, and crews from the IDNR and other agencies will remove fish from the canal and dispose of them in a landfill.  The fish habitat in the section of the canal scheduled for treatment is made up of mostly non-sport fish with the most common species being common carp, goldfish, and gizzard shad.  Before the application of rotenone, an electro-fishing operation will be conducted to relocate as many sport fish as possible. Rotenone dissipates quickly on its own, but to accelerate that process a neutralizing agent known as potassium permanganate will be used following the application. 

 

If Asian carp become established in the Great Lakes, they could cause a catastrophic decline in native fish species and severely damage the Great Lakes sport fishing industry, valued at $7 billion.

 

The Asian Carp Rapid Response Workgroup includes many state and federal agencies including Illinois DNR, USACE, USEPA, USFWS, USCG, USDA, Chicago and regional agencies and commissions, and Wisconsin Sea Grant.   All eight Great Lakes State Fisheries management agencies are providing support for the project.

 

However the process will not be without interruptions and negative economic impacts. While most all of recreational boaters heading south will have already passed thru the barrier area, some 35 commercial carriers and their crews will be idled for four to five days. The Rapid Response Workgoup is requiring suspension of all boat traffic in a five mile area to prevent colliding with the many vessels involved in the Rotenone dispersal/monitoring process. That means commodity products to coal burning power plants and sand and gravel products to Material Service will be impacted during this time and over 300 folks will be out of work for that time period. Some 7,000 boats were idled this past August when the Coast Guard temporarily closed down the barrier while increased voltage testing took place.

 

With Barrier IIB not scheduled for completion until the fall of 2010, the six month periodic maintenance requirement of our new electronic barriers means this shut down could occur again next summer. That is just one more reason to light a fire under the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to expedite the construction process.


Weekly Great Lakes Water Levels for Nov. 20, 2009

Weather Conditions

Above average temperatures characterized weather conditions across the Great Lakes basin early this week.  An upper level disturbance did bring scattered rain showers to the basin on Wednesday and Thursday, but precipitation to date in November remains well below average.  The Great lakes basin will likely be dry and sunny with slightly above average temperatures through the weekend and into Monday and Tuesday.

 Lake Level Conditions

All of the Great Lakes except for Lake Ontario remain several inches higher than their levels of a year ago. Lakes Superior, Michigan-Huron, St. Clair and Erie are 3, 11, 4, and 5 inches, respectively, higher than their levels last year at this time. Lake Ontario is 3 inches below its level of year ago. The water levels of Lakes Superior and Michigan-Huron are expected to decline by 3 and 2 inches, respectively, over the next month.  Lake St. Clair, Erie and Ontario are expected to decline 2, 1, and 2 inches, respectively, over the next 30 days.  Over the next several months, Lake Superior, Lake Michigan-Huron and Lake St. Clair are forecasted to be above their water levels of a year ago. Lakes Erie and Ontario are forecasted to remain near or below last year's levels over the same time period.

Current Outflows/Channel Conditions

In October, the outflow from Lake Superior through the St. Mary's River and the outflow from Lake Michigan-Huron

through the St. Clair River were below average. The flow in the

Detroit River was also below average. The Niagara River carried near average flows during October, while the outflow from Lake Ontario through the St. Lawrence River was above average in October. 

Alerts

Users of the Great Lakes, connecting channels and St. Lawrence River should keep informed of current conditions before undertaking any activities that could be affected by changing water levels. Mariners should utilize navigation charts and refer to current water level readings. 

 

 

Superior

Mich-Huron

St. Clair

Erie

Ontario

Level for Aug 4

 

601.51

 

578.28

 

 

573.95

 

571.06

 

244.32

Datum, in ft

601.1

577.5

572.3

569.2

243.3

Diff in inches

 

 +5

 

   +9

 

+20

 

+22

 

+12

Diff last month

 

0

 

 

            0

 

-1

 

-1

 

-4

Diff from last yr

 

+3

 

+11

 

+4

 

+5

 

-3


Veterans Issues

 Retirees and Vets Allowed to Salute Flag

Traditionally, members of the nation's veterans' service organizations render the hand-salute during the national anthem and at events involving the national flag while wearing their organization's official head-gear. The National Defense Authorization Act of 2008 contained an amendment to allow un-uniformed service members, military retirees, and veterans to render a hand salute during the hoisting, lowering, or passing of the U.S. flag.

A later amendment further authorized hand-salutes during the national anthem by veterans and out-of-uniform military personnel. This was included in the Defense Authorization Act of 2009, which Former President Bush signed on Oct. 14, 2008.

www.military.com/military-report/retirees-and-vets--allowed-to-salute-flag?ESRC=miltrep.nl

 


General

Think Cabela’s This Christmas

Holiday Gift Guide 2009

SIDNEY, Neb. – Are you hunting for the perfect gifts for the outdoor enthusiasts on your list? Look no further than Cabela’s, the World’s Foremost Outfitter of hunting, fishing and outdoor gear. Cabela’s comprehensive selection of clothing and equipment includes holiday values for the friends and family on your list, whether they’re hard-core hunters, avid anglers or people passionate about everything the outdoors have to offer. With three ways to shop Cabela’s (via retail stores, online at www.cabelas.com or through their famous catalogs), you’re just a short drive, click or page away from the best Christmas yet.

 

Gifts Less Than $30

Fly-Tying Tool Kit – All the high-quality brass tools to get started tying flies - including scissors, bobbin, bodkin, hackle pliers, whip finisher, dubbing twister and bobbin threader in a 8" x 5" x 1-1/2 lined wooden box for convenient travel and storage. Built-in pedestal vise will hold hooks down to a size 24. $29.99

 

Camo Gun Cases – These are virtually indestructible Tuff Nylon shells and heavy foam padding to shield firearms from the roughest bumps and bangs. Soft lining is easy on expensive finishes and resists snags and abrasion. Self-repairing YKK nylon zipper. Full wraparound web handles. Choose the 52" Shotgun Case or 48" Scoped-Rifle Case available in two popular camo patterns. $19.99

 

Diamond Peak Hydration Packs – Made of tough nylon and ripstop polyester, these abrasion-resistant packs will take abuse. 70-oz. reservoir with an on/off bite valve and a tube clip on the shoulder strap keeps the valve in place and convenient for use. The padded mesh back panel makes it comfortable to carry, and the shoulder straps are adjustable for the right fit. Front cargo pocket for carrying keys or other small items. $24.99

 

Gifts Less Than $50

Activ-Lite Shell-N-Bird Belt – This quick-loading, easy-access bird belt takes all the weight off your shoulders. The ergonomic design gives you added back support for long hunts. This belt is perfect for dog trials, shooting at the range or a long day out in the field. Features three storage pockets, two water-bottle holders, two hooks for carrying birds, shock cords, multiple D-rings and 10 quick-access shotshell holders. $39.99

 

Women's Hiker Fit Flannel- and Fleece-Lined Jeans – Incredibly soft, durable, 100 percent cotton flannel or 100 percent fleece lining keeps your legs warm. The relaxed cut and tapered ankle gives a roomy fit that's not constricting. Introducing new softer denim that creates a pre-worn feel. Machine washable. $44.99

 

Whuppin' Stick Baitcasting Combo – this is a  rod-and-reel combo tough enough to whup any fish that swims the freshwater. Sturdy graphite-frame reel has a five ball-bearing system for smooth action and one-way instant anti-reverse clutch. It comes with an original Whuppin' Stick advanced polymer fiberglass rod. $39.99

Gifts Less Than $100

Alaskan Guide Headlamps – Cabela's products bearing the Alaskan Guide Series name go through extensive testing to make sure they're up to the challenge of enduring extreme outdoor conditions. These headlamps are built of super-tough Xylex, and have nearly indestructible Lexan lenses. All are weatherproof, olive drab and have adjustable headbands for optimal comfort. $39.99-$89.99

 

Instant Cooking Station – Camp cooking is less of a chore and more of a pleasant part of the outdoors experience when you have the functional convenience of this portable, fold-up kitchen. The main table top and the two side tables are made of aluminum. The stainless steel storage grate below the main table top is 22"W x 19"L. Also includes a paper-towel holder and four S-hooks for hanging pans and utensils. And the whole unit is easily transportable in its included carry bag. $89.99

 

Guidewear Boat Shoes – Traditional boat shoe styling and quality construction come together. Featuring waterproof leather and an air mesh lining, these shoes are built to keep your feet dry from external encounters with water as well as vent internal perspiration. The 360 degree lacing system ensures a snug fit. Nonmarking performance siped rubber sole channels water for sure-footed steps. Choose from the 3-Eye or Toggle models. $59.99

 

Gifts More Than $100

Pine Ridge Roof-Prism Binoculars – Designed to deliver excellent performance at affordable prices with nitrogen-charged and O-ring sealed construction to make them 100 percent waterproof and fogproof. BaK-4 roof prisms and quality lenses produce clear, crisp images and colors. A large, centrally located, grooved focus wheel is engineered to bring images into view clearly and quickly with one hand. $199.99-$249.99

 

Guide Tech Jacket – Rugged shell material lined with waterproof and breathable GORE-TEX gives you essential windproof and waterproof performance in a fisherman-friendly design. Two cargo pockets with hook-and-loop closures in front of two fabric-lined handwarmer pockets, four zip pockets across the chest and an internal zip security pocket. $179.99-$199.99

 

Custom Fit Cordura Seat Covers – These heavy-duty, water-resistant 600-denier Cordura nylon seat covers will stand up to rugged use. Available in a wide variety of styles for a custom fit on the most popular cars, trucks and SUVs. The built-in nylon straps and quick-release buckles ensure quick and easy installation. Set includes headrest and armrest covers where applicable. Made in the USA. $129.99

 

Cabela’s Gift Cards

For a gift that always fits, choose a Cabela’s Gift Card in denominations from $5 to $5,000. Redeemable through any of Cabela’s three channels: in stores, online or through their world-famous catalogs.

 

For more info e-mail communications@cabelas.com  or call 800-331-3454


Future Fisherman Foundation launches Tournaments for Tomorrow

LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS -- The Future Fisherman Foundation announced the launch of a new program, Tournaments for Tomorrow, that will provide financial support for youth fishing programs such as the mentor-based Hooked on Fishing Not on Drugs program, the school-based Physh Ed angling and boating education program, and the Boys & Girls Clubs' C.A.T.C.H. after-school fishing program.

 

"Since 1986, more than one million children in 50 states have been introduced to fishing, boating and conservation through their participation in these important national programs," said F3 Executive Director Keith Sutton. "But sustaining these efforts requires hundreds of thousands of dollars each year to provide teacher training, program materials and staff support. It wouldn't be possible without partners who provide financial assistance, including tournament fishing organizations such as Bass Pro Shops' Crappie Masters Tournament Trail that have raised thousands of dollars to help fund F3's vital kids fishing programs. Through their encouragement, we created the new Tournaments for Tomorrow program so tournament groups everywhere have a simple way for their members to make contributions as well. It's a mutually beneficial arrangement-a win-win deal for the tournament organization, the Foundation, the fishing community and future generations."

 

Each organization that enrolls agrees to raise funds by asking tournament participants to contribute an extra $5 to $10 per entry fee, or an amount of their choosing, to support F3 programs. Alternatively, the organization can "pass the hat" (or maybe pass a bait bucket!) at their opening events and ask for contributions. Members can give an amount that's comfortable for them. And while individual donations may not be much more than the cost of a single fishing lure, some groups have raised hundreds of dollars at a single event, an important contribution that provides fishing experiences and education for dozens of children.

Upon enrollment in the program, the organization will be licensed to use the Future Fisherman Foundation "Proud Partner" logo in their publications and on their website to show their members support efforts to ensure the future of fishing. F3 also will send a special DVD the Tournaments for Tomorrow chairperson can use to show tournament participants and club members how their dollars will help. Each club will receive recognition for their participation in the Foundation newsletter and in the "Partners" section of the F3 website. Additionally, the Foundation will use their blog and Facebook pages to help publicize youth events held in conjunction with each organization's tournaments.

 

"We've been contacted by dozens of tournament groups throughout the country that want to get involved with the Foundation's youth outreach programs," Sutton said. "Becoming part of our Tournaments for Tomorrow initiative is a great way they can show their support and let the world know they have the same mission we do-to provide quality fishing experiences for every child in America. Working together with the thousands of fishing clubs and competitive anglers around the country, we can make this dream a reality."

 

For additional information about the Tournaments for Tomorrow program, including a downloadable enrollment form, visit the Future Fisherman Foundation's website, or contact Keith Sutton at (703) 402-3623 or ksutton@futurefisherman.org.

 

Established in 1986, the Future Fisherman Foundation unites the sportfishing industry and a nationwide network of state outdoor educators, national conservation groups and youth organizations dedicated to introducing America's youth to angling and the outdoors. These efforts help people of all ages have safe and enjoyable fishing experiences that foster conservation ethics.

 

 


Indiana

School and DNR Partner to Promote Outdoor Ed

In these days of video games and computers, getting outside is still important. That's why Columbia City High School zoology students have partnered with the Indiana Department of Natural Resources for the second straight year to better appreciate their natural world.

 

Teacher Jim Sittler's 10th-, 11th-, and 12th-graders combined to create a nature center-quality display showing native Indiana aquatic species found in glacial lakes. Each student group collected various aquatic plants, fish, reptiles, amphibians, and invertebrates, then built the display and created informational posters that describe some of the species in the aquarium.

 

"This project was designed to get the students outdoors and looking for the species they were assigned to collect," Sittler said. "How else can you teach students an appreciation of the natural world unless you put them in it?"

Students collected their assigned species with DNR biologists and members of the Indiana Chapter of the American Fisheries Society (IN-AFS). The IN-AFS promotes outdoor aquatic education and encourages its members to take every opportunity to interact with students and teach them about aquatic resources.

 

"This is our second year of working collaboratively on projects with Jim Sittler's classes," said Angela Grier, a DNR fisheries biologist and past president of the Indiana Chapter of the American Fisheries Society.  Last year, students designed creative ways that would allow biologists to sample fish populations in the winter under the ice.

 

"Working with high school students has been a great experience for us and we hope that we have inspired them to better appreciate natural resources," Grier said.

 


Michigan

Michigan Legislature OKs $25.3 million Great Lakes Research Center

HOUGHTON, MI — The state Legislature has given Michigan Technological University a go-ahead for its planned $25.3 million Great Lakes Research Center.  The Legislature's Joint Capital Outlay Committee decided Thursday to let the school seek construction bids. The center is planned for a waterfront site near Michigan Tech's campus in Houghton.  The state is

 

to pay 74 % of the cost and the university 26 %.

 

The 49,000-square-foot center will house laboratories, boat maintenance facilities, offices and conference rooms. It also will accommodate joint activities of researchers from Michigan Tech and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' environmental lab in Vicksburg, Miss.


Winter Becoming an Outdoors-Woman Program Set for UP Feb 26-28

Women seeking the opportunity to improve their outdoor skills are invited to register for the 10th annual Becoming an Outdoors-Woman (BOW) winter program, set for Feb. 26-28 in Big Bay, 30 miles north of Marquette.  The program will be held at Bay Cliff Health Camp, a universally accessible facility, located in a picturesque wooded setting overlooking Lake Superior.

 

Sponsored by the Michigan DNR, this program offers instruction in more than a dozen kinds of outdoor activities, including cross country skiing, snowmobiling, dog sledding, ice fishing, fly tying, and wilderness first aid. Instructors provide basic and advanced instruction tailored to the participant's individual ability.

 

The $175 registration fee includes all food and lodging, as well as most equipment and supplies (except as noted in the registration materials). Participants will be housed in a dorm-style facility with many amenities, including a sauna and hiking trails with access to Lake Superior.

Becoming an Outdoors-Woman workshops are for women, 18 and older, who wish to learn outdoor skills in a relaxed, noncompetitive atmosphere. The U.P. BOW program also includes special evening programs during the weekend event.

 

Early registration is recommended as the program fills quickly. Class information and registration materials are available online at www.michigan.gov/bow. Registration fees may also be paid online. For more information, contact Sharon Pitz at the DNR office in Marquette at (906) 228-6561 or e-mail pitzs@michigan.gov.

 

Many other outdoors programs for women are scheduled across Michigan. To learn more about these additional opportunities, check the BOW Web site or call (517) 241-2225; e-mail: DNR-Outdoors-Woman@michigan.gov.

 

The DNR is committed to the conservation, protection, management, accessible use and enjoyment of the state’s natural resources for current and future generations.

 


New York

DEC requests closure of American shad fisheries

With the American shad population in the Hudson River at historic lows, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has announced draft regulations to prohibit commercial and recreational fishing for American shad in the Hudson River and the Marine and Coastal District of New York.

 

The closure is necessary because the Hudson River shad stock has declined dramatically since the 1990s. Juvenile production dropped to below average in 2002 and has not rebounded. Hudson River recreational and commercial fisheries were restricted in 2008 with the hope that it would trigger some improvement in production of young American shad. With no improvement in stock status, a fishery closure was the only remaining alternative.

 

DEC Commissioner Pete Grannis said: "New York is proposing this measure because of the severity of the declines in the American shad population throughout the region and the importance of protecting this species. DEC has thoroughly evaluated all the data available and a closure is the most appropriate step to help this fishery recover."

 

Last year the DEC adopted the Hudson River American Shad Recovery Plan to help rebuild the stock. In 2009, several parts of the Recovery Plan were implemented, including: a tagging/tracking study to better to understand adult spawning habitat use; a bycatch monitoring program to quantify American shad caught in ocean fisheries; sample collections to evaluate habitat use by early life stages of fish; and a continuation of diet studies on predatory fish such as striped bass. DEC is working on a Recovery Plan update which will include a progress report and is developing reopening criteria for the recreational and commercial fisheries.

 

Also, DEC's draft regulations propose a change to the daily creel limit for American shad in the Delaware River from 6 fish a day to 3 fish to further protect that population.

 

The draft regulations were released last week in the New York State Register - www.dos.state.ny.us/info/register/2009.html. The public comment period will be open until Jan. 4, 2010. Written comments can be sent to Kathryn Hattala, NYSDEC 21 S. Putt Corners Rd., New Paltz, NY 12561 or by email to kahattal@gw.dec.state.ny.us .


DEC Offers BOW Workshop January 29-31

New York's second annual winter Becoming and Outdoorswoman workshop is scheduled for the weekend of January 29-31, 2010 at the Rensselaerville Meeting Center, Albany County.

 

Becoming an Outdoorswoman is a program that offers weekend-long, outdoor skills workshops for women ages 18 or older, and is designed for women with little or no experience with outdoor activities. Nearly 25 different classes will be offered at the Rensselaerville workshop. These  classes include ice fishing, snowshoeing, winter camping, nature journaling, trail cameras, bicycle maintenance, winter survival, cross country  skiing, fly tying, ecology of the winter forest, reading wildlife sign and backcountry skiing. The

 

upcoming January workshop also includes an exciting biathalon-type class that combines snowshoeing and target shooting with .22-caliber rifles.

 

The early registration fee is $310, which covers instruction in three classes, meals, two nights lodging, program materials and use of equipment.

 

Workshop information and registration materials are available on the DEC website at www.dec.ny.gov/education/68.html.   Information is also available by calling DEC at 518-402-8862 or writing to "Becoming an Outdoorswoman," NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation, 625 Broadway, Albany, NY 12233-4754.


New York DEC Hails "No Discharge Zone"

Designation for South Shore Estuary

Effective immediately, more than 110,000 acres of New York's South Shore estuary waters are now designated as a "No Discharge Zone" and the release of sewage from boat toilets

and holding tanks is prohibited. Commissioner of Environmental Conservation Pete Grannis hails the federal measure as a means to significant improvement in the area's water quality.


 

The opinions expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the GLSFC, its officers or staff. 

Reproduction of any material by paid-up members of the GLSFC is encouraged but appropriate credit must be given. 

Reproduction by others without written permission is prohibited.

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