Week of November 27, 2006

 

National

Regional

Indiana

New York

Ohio

Ontario

 

       Weekly News Archives

                         or

       New Product  Archives

National

New Passport rules take effect January 23

All air travelers entering- or re-entering the US, will need to show passports

WASHINGTON -- Virtually all air travelers entering the United States, including U.S. citizens, will need to show passports as of Jan. 23, the Homeland Security Department announced November 22.

 

Until now, U.S. citizens, travelers from Canada and Bermuda, and some travelers from Mexico who have special border-crossing cards for frequent visitors were allowed to show other proofs of identification, such as driver's licenses or birth certificates.

 

"The ability to misuse travel documents to enter this country opens the door for a terrorist to carry out an attack," Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff said. "We cannot continue to allow loopholes that could facilitate access to the United States through false claims of citizenship or fake identities." "Right now, there are 8,000 different state and local entities in the U.S. issuing birth certificates and driver's licenses," Chertoff said.

 

The passport requirement came about as a result of recommendations made by the September 11 commission. The requirement was passed into law as part of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004.

 

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers intercepted more than 75,000 fraudulent documents in fiscal 2005 and apprehended more than 84,000 people at the ports of entry trying to cross the border with fraudulent claims of citizenship or documents.

 

Under a separate program, the Homeland Security

Department plans to require all travelers entering the U.S. by land or sea, including Americans, to show passports or an alternative security identification card when entering the U.S. starting as early as January 2008.

 

The only acceptable alternative documents to a passport for air travel will be the Merchant Mariner Document (MMD) and the NEXUS Air card. The MMD or “z-card” is issued by the U.S. Coast Guard to U.S. merchant mariners and the NEXUS Air card is issued to citizens of Canada and the United States, lawful permanent residents of the United States and permanent residents of Canada who meet certain eligibility requirements. The NEXUS Air card may only be accepted when used in conjunction with the NEXUS Air program. The MMD card may only be accepted when used on official business by U.S. Citizen Merchant Mariners. Members of the United States military, when traveling on official orders, may continue to present their military ID and orders for entry.

 

The Passport Card (also referred to as the PASS Card) is currently under development and will be available for use for travel only via land or sea (including ferries) between the U.S. and Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Bermuda.  Similar in size to a credit card, it will fit easily into a wallet.

 

Unconfirmed announcements have also stated that deep-sea fishermen who go more than 60 miles into the Gulf of Mexico will need them, too.

 

Those wishing to view the final rule may visit www.dhs.gov  or www.travel.state.gov.   The rule was published in the Federal Register on Friday, November 24, 2006, where it can be viewed at www.regulations.gov.

 


Study Concludes Benefits of Eating Fish Outweigh Risks

WASHINGTON, DC, (ENS) - The health benefits of eating seafood generally outweigh the risks, but consumers face a confusing array of information about the nutritional value and health risks associated with fish and shellfish, according to a new report by the Institute of Medicine.

 

"Consumers need better guidance on making seafood choices," said Malden C. Nesheim, a Cornell University professor and chair of the committee that wrote the report. "The committee's approach to balancing the benefits and risks brings this information together in a coordinated way that applies to all population groups. Our model offers a foundation upon which agencies can develop advice that presents information in a user-friendly way and allows consumers to weigh all the relevant details and make well-informed choices."

 

The study recommends federal agencies to partner with state, local, and private groups to develop new informational tools and test them with consumers to make sure they work.

 

The committee concluded that healthy adults can safely consume up to 12 ounces of fish a week.

 

It found that the benefits and risks for broad categories of seafood are relatively consistent and fish generally are good sources of protein, low in saturated fat and cholesterol and provide moderate amounts of omega-3 fatty acids. Predatory fish with long life spans -- such as swordfish, shark, and

tilefish -- contain levels of methylmercury that are too high for pregnant and breast-feeding women, the committee concluded.

 

For all seafood categories, levels of contaminants such as dioxin and PCBs in commercially obtained fish generally do not pose health risks when consumed in amounts recommended by federal agencies, the report said. The study was requested by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

 

Another study, published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association by researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health, drew similar conclusions about the benefits of eating fish.

 

Some environmentalists criticized the Institute of Medicine report for not address the environmental and economic concerns associated with eating seafood.

 

Committee members said the panel was not asked to examine the environmental factors that may affect seafood choices and specifically focused on analyzing the evidence on the nutrient and contamination content of various types of fish and shellfish.

 

The full report can be found here: www.nap.edu/catalog/11762.html 

 

www.ens-newswire.com/ens/oct2006/2006-10-18-09.asp#anchor1


Saltwater License needed for N. Carolina Jan. 1

RALEIGH, N.C. - Effective Jan. 1, anyone 16 years and older fishing recreationally in North Carolina's coastal waters will need a fishing license. Anglers under 16 will not need to purchase a license.  This is the first state to announce, but other coastal states are sure to follow.

 

A Coastal Recreational Fishing License (CRFL) will be required to harvest finfish in the state's coastal fishing waters, which include sounds, coastal rivers and their tributaries, out to three miles into the ocean. Recreational anglers who catch fish from three miles to 200 miles offshore will be required to have this license in order to transport fish back to the shore.

 

Anglers fishing recreationally in joint waters - areas managed by the Marine Fisheries Commission and the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission - will need either a CRFL or an inland fishing license.   Currently, anglers 16 and over need a license when fishing in public, inland waters, which are managed by the Wildlife Resources Commission.

 

Revenues generated from sales of CRFLs must be used to

conserve and enhance North Carolina's marine fisheries resources, according to Division of Marine Fisheries (DMF) Director Pres Pate.

 

License revenues will go into two marine resources funds managed by the state's Wildlife Resources and Marine Fisheries commissions.   In 2005, North Carolina had over 2 million recreational anglers fishing from coastal waters and was ranked third in the nation for the amount of recreationally harvested saltwater fish.

 

Prices for the CRFL will vary depending on residency, age, duration and type of license purchased. For residents, the annual cost for a CRFL will be $15; for a 10-day license, $5. For non-residents, the annual cost for a CRFL will be $30; for a 10-day license, $10.

 

To view a complete list of license options, visit DMF's Web site, www.ncfisheries.net . The cost to fish in North Carolina's public, inland waters will remain at $15 annually for residents.

 


Ban on regional fish shipments eased

USDA amends VHS fish order

Now allows for interstate movement of VHS-susceptible live species of fish under certain conditions

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service on November 14 modified an Oct. 24, 2006, emergency order prohibiting the importation of 37 species of live fish from two Canadian provinces into the United States and the interstate movement of the same species from the eight states bordering the Great Lakes.

 

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation on November 21 also filed an emergency regulation to help prevent the spread of VHS to additional waters in the State.  The regulation, which took effect immediately, limits the release, possession, and taking of certain bait and other live fish species.

 

The federal modifications will allow Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin to move interstate live species of fish susceptible to viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) if they can meet certain conditions designed to prevent the spread of the disease, which isn’t harmful to people but can be deadly to fish.

 

The latest announcement acts on the recommendations presented to APHIS during the recent two-day state and industry meeting.  These new requirements allow fish industries in the eight Great Lake states to move susceptible species interstate while also protecting against the spread of VHS.

 

But the amended order goes only part way in meeting state concerns, say fishery officials. The amendments APHIS granted, were orders that should have been included initially, they say. Still to be considered is a more permanent "interim rule," which is expected next March. But that may not be done in time for the spring sport fishing seasons, officials say.

 

One of the biggest concerns is federal officials trying to halt the deadly fish virus but ignoring a request by experts to deal with ballast water. State officials and conservation groups are angry that the feds continue to stall on ballast management – the vehicle largely held responsible for the introduction, and  interstate movement of, invasive species and viruses between the Great Lakes.

 

Lake and international carriers are widely seen as responsible for the introduction of invasives, and their spreading between the Great Lakes.  These carriers continue to be viewed as the chief lobbying group opposed to state or federal regulations and guidelines for meaningful ballast management. 

 

Many questioned how you can fight the virus by banning shipments of minnows but not dealing with ballast water. Lake carriers taking on ballast in one lake and dumping an another lake is how this virus will spread.

 

There are even some rumblings of preventing lake carriers from the lower Great Lakes traveling to the upper Great Lakes and subsequently spreading VHS and other highly volatile critters and viruses to additional lakes.  Minnesota has

expressed such concerns and proposals. Michigan is the first to implement a law requiring permits for ballast dumping in its waters. 

 

One former New York State Representative, Richard Smith is calling for the closure of the St. Lawrence Seaway. Smith says: “We have attempted to control ballast water dumping but all current methods have drastically failed. The public should not be subjected to the constant fear of what will be the next invasive species or pollutant added to 85% of the US fresh water supply. ”To add insult to injury a high cost proposal is being floated to enlarge and deepen the Seaway to allow more ships with hidden invaders to enter the Great Lakes”, Smith adds.

 

Three years ago such an idea would have subjected Smith to being hauled off in a straight jacket; today the idea is catching on.  In fact, a recent study from Grand Valley State University from Michigan showed it was economically beneficial to close the waterway.

 

With the exception of Salmonids, the movement of susceptible species of live fish from Quebec and Ontario into the United States remain prohibited under the revised Federal Order.  APHIS will be drafting an interim rule to further address the movement of fish from Canada and the Great Lakes states.

 

Under the revised Federal Order, conditions for the interstate movement of VHS-susceptible species vary depending on whether the live fish are being transported for slaughter, research or other purposes. 

 

In order for VHS-susceptible species to move interstate for slaughter, the fish must be:

  ► Intended for human consumption

  ► Transported to a state-inspected slaughter facility that discharges waste water into a municipal sewage system that includes waste water treatment.  As an alternative, the facility can also dispose of waste water in a non-discharging, settling pond or a settling pond that disinfects according to federal and state requirements.  Offal, including carcasses, from the slaughter facility must be either rendered or composted.

  ► Accompanied by the proper USDA documentation for the movement of restricted animals if not tested for VHS.

 

In order to move VHS-susceptible species for purposes other than slaughter, research or diagnostics, the fish must be transported with documentation from appropriate state, tribal, or federal authorities for aquatic animal health stating that the fish have tested negative for the VHS virus under existing national and international standards specified in the Federal Order.

 

These restrictions do not apply to live species of VHS-susceptible fish originating from non-restricted states.  Fish from states not included in the Federal order can transit the affected Great Lakes states without oversight.

             

The modified and the original emergency orders putting these protections into place can be found at: www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/aqua/  .

 


Save our Lakes-Shut down St. Lawrence Seaway

By Capt Dick Smith

The time has come to close the St. Lawrence Seaway to save the Great Lakes for future generations.

 

Over the past years much discussion has been held in regard to the impact of the St. Lawrence Seaway on the Great Lakes Eco System.  Is it good or bad, enlarge it or eliminate it completely?

 

Economic research has shown that the Seaway has saved our great lakes region about $55 million a year in transportation costs and if eliminated would add approximately 1.6 trains and 197 trucks per day. As we well know the seaway is a part time transportation system that is limited due to weather conditions and is about 7% of the total system.

 

Now, let us look at the real impact on the residents and our industry.  Over 180 invasive exotic species (such as zebra mussels) have been dumped via ballast water into the Great Lakes from overseas ships.  Our eco-system has been altered daily since the opening of the Seaway which allowed ocean going vessels direct access to our area. The dumping of water in their bilges continues to spit out the invaders that alter our fisheries and clog our water intakes.  The latest discharge is a fish disease called VHS which fortunately does

not affect humans but could destroy the fishery.  The cost impact of zebra mussels alone is said to be over $200 million per year. Add all the exotic introductions and the estimates are over $1 billion per year we cannot afford to spend this amount to save $55 million per year.

 

The answer is simple -SHUT IT DOWN.

 

We have attempted to control ballast water dumping but all current methods have drastically failed. The public should not be subjected to the constant fear of what will be the next invasive species or pollutant added to 85% percent of the US fresh water supply. To add insult to injury a high cost proposal is being floated to enlarge and deepen the Seaway to allow more ships with hidden invaders to enter the Great Lakes.

 

Contact your legislators to stop the invasion by closing the Seaway.

 

(Smith is a 3 term former State Representative to the New York State Legislature, former elected highway official of Hamburg, NY,  former President of the Southtowns Walleye Association of WNY and former Vice President of the GLSFC.  Capt. Smith runs Lucky 7 Charters on Lake Erie)  lucky7char@aol.com  (716) 648-9071


Regional

Dec Adopts Emergency Regs to Prevent Spread of VHS to more NY Waters   

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced last week the filing of an emergency regulation to help prevent the spread of VHS to additional waters in the State.  The regulation, which took effect immediately, limits the release, possession, and taking of certain bait and other live fish species. VHS is a pathogen of fish and does not pose any threat to public health.   

 

VHS was first confirmed in New York waters in May 2006 in Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River, and has now also been confirmed in several fish species in Great Lakes basin waters in New York State and other states. Once a fish is infected with VHS, there is no known cure. Because of the fatal virus's ability to spread, and potential impact on fisheries, recreation, and the economy, the World Organization of Animal Health has categorized VHS as a transmissible disease with the potential for profound socio-economic consequences.

 

A Federal Order was issued on October 24, 2006, and amended on November 14, 2006 prohibiting interstate movement of fish species unless the fish have been tested and certified free of VHS based on testing procedures implemented on the state level. 

Information on the Federal Order can be found on the APHIS website at www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/aqua/.     

 

The Federal Order does not address the movement of fish within New York State.  In-state movement of fish for use as bait or for stocking could spread VHS in New York and cause significant adverse impacts to the State’s fish resources.

 

The New York order:

 ► Prohibits the commercial collection of bait fish from waters of the State where VHS has been detected. The rule amends State regulations by removing certain waters impacted by VHS from the list of specially designated waters that allow bait fish to be taken for commercial purposes,

 

 ► Limits the personal possession and use of bait fish.  The rule limits the number of bait fish that may be possessed to a  

total of 100, as well as restricts the use of bait fish for personal use to the specific water from which it was collected. This rule does not pertain to the possession of bait fish in the Marine District.

 

► It also requires live fish destined for release into the waters of the State to be inspected by certified professionals and be certified to be free of VHS and other serious fish diseases. The rule prohibits the placement of live fish into the waters of the State (including possessing, importing and transporting live fish for purposes of placing them into the waters of the State) unless accompanied by a fish health inspection report issued within the previous 12 months.

 

For all species of freshwater fish, a fish health inspection report shall certify that the fish are free of VHS, Furunculosis, Enteric Red Mouth, Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus, Spring Viremia of Carp Virus, and Heterosporis. For salmon and trout, the fish health reports must also certify that the fish are free of Whirling Disease, Bacterial Kidney Disease (BKD0, and Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus (IHN). The fish health reports must be issued by an independent, qualified inspector, as well as conform to specific testing methods and procedures.  

 

The emergency regulations became effective November 21, 2006.  Text of the regulation is available at www.dec.state.ny.us/website/dfwmr/propregs/   Hard copies of the rulemaking can also be requested from DEC by writing to: Shaun Keeler, NYSDEC, 625 Broadway, Albany, NY 12233-4750; or by calling DEC at (518) 402-8920.

 

While the emergency measure is in place, DEC will proceed with proposing these amendments as a permanent rulemaking.  Publication in the State Register on December 6, 2006, will initiate a 45-day public comment period, concluding on January 22, 2006.  During this time, the public may email comments by accessing www.dec.state.ny.us/website/dfwmr/propregs/ on the DEC website. Comments can also be mailed to Shaun Keeler, NYS DEC, 625 Broadway, Albany, NY 12233-4750.


Weekly Great Lakes Water Levels for Nov 24, 2006

Lake Level Conditions: 

Lake Superior is currently 13 inches lower than it was a year ago, while the remaining lakes are all higher than the previous year.  Currently, all of the lakes are in their period of seasonal decline.  Over the next month, the water level in Lake Superior is projected to fall 3 inches while the level in Lake Michigan-Huron, Lake St. Clair and Lake Erie are expected to decline 2 inches and Lake Ontario is forecasted to fall 3 inches.  Over the next few months, Lake Superior is expected to remain well below last year’s levels, while Lakes Michigan-Huron, St. Clair, Erie, and Ontario are predicted to remain above the water levels of a year ago.  See our Daily Levels web page for more water level information.

Current Outflows/Channel Conditions:

The Lake Superior outflow through the St. Marys River into Lake Huron is expected to be below average in November.  Flows in the St. Clair and Detroit Rivers also are expected to be below average during November.  Flow in the Niagara River, as well as the St. Lawrence River, is expected to be above average.

Alerts:

Due to abnormally dry conditions on the Lake Superior basin over the last five months, Lake Superior’s water level is

currently below chart datum and is expected to remain below datum through April.  Users of the Great Lakes, connecting channels and St. Lawrence River should keep informed of current conditions before undertaking any activities that could be affected by changing water levels.  Mariners should utilize navigation charts and refer to current water level readings. 

 

 

Superior

Mich-Huron

St. Clair

Erie

Ontario

Level for Nov 24

600.5

577.3

573.7

571.2

245.3

Datum, in ft

601.1

577.5

572.3

569.2

243.3

Diff in inches

-8

-3

+17

+24

+25

Diff last month

-4

-2

+1

0

+2

Diff from last yr

-13

+2

+10

+11

+9


Coast Guard comment period ends Nov 13

All comments available online at Docket # 25767

CLEVELAND - The public comment period, concerning the Ninth Coast Guard District's proposal to establish 34 safety zones throughout the U.S. Great Lakes ended on Nov. 13, 2006. More than 950 comments have been submitted to the Federal Docket for formal consideration by the Coast Guard. 

 

"I pledge to thoroughly review the docket submissions and diligently work towards a resolution that will satisfy all

concerns without degradation to the Coast Guard's readiness of the Great Lakes," said Rear. Adm. John E. Crowley, Jr., commander of the Ninth Coast Guard District.   No specific timeline, for the announcement of a final decision, has been set.

 

To view the comments on the Federal Docket page (Docket # 25767) go to:  http://dms.dot.gov/search/searchResultsSimple.cfm


Indiana

Public hearings on proposed fish regulations - December 18 & 21

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources has scheduled two public hearings to receive comments on proposed Indiana fisheries administrative rule changes. The hearings will be held on:

 

► Monday, Dec. 18 at 6 p.m. (EST) at the DNR's Northeast Regional Office in Columbia City, 1353 S. Governors Dr

► Thursday, Dec. 21 at 6 p.m. (EST) at Atterbury Fish and Wildlife Area near Edinburgh, 7970 S. Rowe St

 

The DNR is proposing several rule changes to help protect fisheries resources while addressing enforcement, legal and social concerns. Several important proposed changes concern:

 

- BASS

A 20-inch minimum size limit and one-fish daily bag limit on black bass (smallmouth, largemouth, spotted) is proposed for Sugar Creek in west central Indiana.

 

A protected 12 to 15-inch slot size limit on black bass is proposed at the Blue River in southern Indiana where bass smaller than 12 inches and longer than 15 inches would be able to be taken, but only two of the five bass daily bag limit may be larger than 15 inches.

 

- TROUT

The former closed season for inland stream trout fishing would be changed to a "catch and release only" season from Jan. 1 through April 14.  A proposed closed trout season on inland streams would run from April 15 to the last Saturday in April (opening day) during which the hatcheries complete the annual trout stockings.

 

Opening day for stream trout season would still be the last Saturday in April. However, the starting time would be changed from 5 to 6 a.m. local time to adjust to daylight savings time.

 

A brown trout bag limit of one fish (out of the daily limit of five trout) would apply at inland lakes and streams statewide, but

would not apply to Lake Michigan and its tributaries.

 

Three stream segments in Elkhart County (totaling 2.8 miles) are proposed to be "catch and release only" and "artificial baits or flies only" trout fishing areas.

 

- BOWFISHING

Bowfishing would be allowed day or night for certain fish species at eight large stream reaches where gigging and spearing is already permitted.

 

- SHOVELNOSE STURGEON

Shovelnose sturgeon would be required to be at least 25 inches long from the tip of the snout to the fork of the tail in order to be taken by either sport or commercial fishermen.  A commercial fishing open season would be defined as Oct. 1 through May 31 on public waters other than the Ohio River.

 

- J.C. MURPHEY LAKE

Existing experimental rules for largemouth bass and panfish would become permanent at this popular fishing lake at Willow Slough Fish and Wildlife Area in Newton County. Bass are regulated by an 18-inch minimum size limit (and two fish daily bag limit) and there is a combined 25 fish daily bag limit for bluegill, redear and crappie.

 

Proposed rule changes available at: www.in.gov/dnr/fishwild/about/   Click on "2006 Fisheries Administrative Rule Changes.

 

Public comments can be sent by e-mail or written letter, or voiced at the public hearing.  Written comments can be sent to: Hearing Officer, Natural Resources Commission, 402 W. Washington St,  W272 Indianapolis, IN 46204, or send comments via email to:  jkane@nrc.in.gov .  Written comments must be received no later than Dec. 21.

 

A copy of the public hearing report will be available at www.IN.gov/nrc  prior to final consideration by the Natural Resources Commission.

 


New York

Dec Adopts Emergency Regs to Prevent Spread of VHS to more NY Waters   

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced last week the filing of an emergency regulation to help prevent the spread of VHS to additional waters in the State.  The regulation, which took effect immediately, limits the release, possession, and taking of certain bait and other live fish species. VHS is a pathogen of fish and does not pose any threat to public health.   

 

VHS was first confirmed in New York waters in May 2006 in Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River, and has now also been confirmed in several fish species in Great Lakes basin waters in New York State and other states. Once a fish is infected with VHS, there is no known cure. Because of the fatal virus's ability to spread, and potential impact on fisheries, recreation, and the economy, the World Organization of Animal Health has categorized VHS as a transmissible disease with the potential for profound socio-economic consequences.

 

A Federal Order was issued on October 24, 2006, and amended on November 14, 2006 prohibiting interstate movement of fish species unless the fish have been tested and certified free of VHS based on testing procedures implemented on the state level. 

Information on the Federal Order can be found on the APHIS website at www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/aqua/.     

 

The Federal Order does not address the movement of fish within New York State.  In-state movement of fish for use as bait or for stocking could spread VHS in New York and cause significant adverse impacts to the State’s fish resources.

 

The New York order:

 ► Prohibits the commercial collection of bait fish from waters of the State where VHS has been detected. The rule amends State regulations by removing certain waters impacted by VHS from the list of specially designated waters that allow bait fish to be taken for commercial purposes,

 

 ► Limits the personal possession and use of bait fish.  The rule limits the number of bait fish that may be possessed to a

total of 100, as well as restricts the use of bait fish for personal use to the specific water from which it was collected. This rule does not pertain to the possession of bait fish in the Marine District. 

 

 ► It also requires live fish destined for release into the waters of the State to be inspected by certified professionals and be certified to be free of VHS and other serious fish diseases. The rule prohibits the placement of live fish into the waters of the State (including possessing, importing and transporting live fish for purposes of placing them into the waters of the State) unless accompanied by a fish health inspection report issued within the previous 12 months.

 

 For all species of freshwater fish, a fish health inspection report shall certify that the fish are free of VHS, Furunculosis, Enteric Red Mouth, Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus, Spring Viremia of Carp Virus, and Heterosporis. For salmon and trout, the fish health reports must also certify that the fish are free of Whirling Disease, Bacterial Kidney Disease (BKD0, and Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus (IHN). The fish health reports must be issued by an independent, qualified inspector, as well as conform to specific testing methods and procedures.  

 

The emergency regulations became effective November 21, 2006.  Text of the regulation is available at www.dec.state.ny.us/website/dfwmr/propregs/   Hard copies of the rulemaking can also be requested from DEC by writing to: Shaun Keeler, NYSDEC, 625 Broadway, Albany, NY 12233-4750; or by calling DEC at (518) 402-8920.

 

While the emergency measure is in place, DEC will proceed with proposing these amendments as a permanent rulemaking.  Publication in the State Register on December 6, 2006, will initiate a 45-day public comment period, concluding on January 22, 2006.  During this time, the public may email comments by accessing www.dec.state.ny.us/website/dfwmr/propregs/ on the DEC website. Comments can also be mailed to Shaun Keeler, NYS DEC, 625 Broadway, Albany, NY 12233-4750.


Ohio

Public hearing on House Bill 609 Nov 29

A public hearing on House Bill 609, which proposes to buy out the remaining Lake Erie trapnet licenses and effectively end commercial fishing on Ohio waters of the lake, is set for Nov. 29 at 1:30 PM., before the House Finance and Appropriations Committee in Columbus.

 

A sponsor hearing on companion legislation, Senate Bill 351, also is set for Nov. 29 with a public hearing possibly set for the

first week of December, the Ohio Division of Wildlife said.

 

Comments on the proposed buyout, which would use some $4 million in general funds to buy out remaining trapnet licenses, can be directed to state representatives and senators ahead of the hearings. The names and contact information on various legislators is available on-line at www.house.state.oh.us   and www.senate.state.oh.us  by submitting your zip code at the Web addresses.


Ohio's wild boars targeted during deer-gun season

Hunters asked to kill nuisance species during Ohio’s deer-gun and muzzleloader seasons

COLUMBUS, OH - Ohio’s deer-gun hunters are encouraged to harvest any feral swine they encounter in the wild in order to limit the spread of this destructive wild animal species in the state, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Wildlife. 

       

Known in Ohio as “wild boars,” they also are also called free-ranging European wild boar, Russian wild boar, wild pigs, wild hogs, or razorbacks.  These “eating machines” damage agricultural crops, degrade wildlife habitat and consume ground-nesting bird eggs, reptiles, amphibians, or just about anything else they come across, say state wildlife biologists. They also carry diseases that can infect domestic livestock, wildlife, and even people.

       

Wild boars have been reported in Belmont, Guernsey, Noble, Morgan, Hocking, Vinton, Washington, Gallia, Lawrence, Scioto, Butler, Preble, Logan and Champaign counties. The rangy-looking non-native members of the domestic swine family are increasing their distribution in Ohio, according to state wildlife biologists.            

       

Wild boars feed most heavily at dawn and dusk, spending

their days resting in dense vegetation or wallowing in mud holes. These nuisance animals may be legally harvested year-round by hunters with a valid Ohio hunting license or by landowners on their own property.  During the deer-gun and the statewide muzzleloader seasons, a valid Ohio deer permit is also required and hunters should use only the firearm legal for the season.

 

The deer-gun season will be open from Monday, November 27, through Sunday, December 3, from one half-hour before sunrise to sunset. New this season, hunters will have an additional gun-hunting weekend to pursue deer on December 16 and 17, statewide.

Approximately 400,000 hunters are expected to participate in the deer-gun season and 250,000 during the four-day muzzleloader season, December 27 through 30.

       

Wild boar meat is reportedly excellent to eat.  As with any game, proper field dressing and thorough cooking is always recommended.   Experts recommend cooking all types of meat to 155-165 degrees Fahrenheit to kill disease organisms and parasites.

 

Successful wild boar hunters are encouraged to submit digital photographs to be posted on the Division of Wildlife’s web site at  www.ohiodnr.com/wildlife/dow/Photos/PhotoSharing.aspx .


Ontario

Public Forums on the Future of the Great Lakes – November 28, 30, December 5, 7

In Kingston, Windsor, Hamilton and Thunder Bay, Ontario

Pollution Probe and the Environmental Commissioner of Ontario are hosting a series of evening public forums to discuss the future of the Great Lakes.

 

The Environmental Commissioner of Ontario, Gord Miller will provide brief comments on Great Lakes issues, and Pollution Probe's Water Program Director, Rick Findlay will discuss what a new vision for the Great Lakes could look like.  These presentations will be followed by an opportunity for members of the public in attendance to ask questions and input their comments and ideas on the future of the Great Lakes.

 

These events are taking place in four centres across Ontario:

 

KINGSTON, Nov 28, 6:00-8:00 PM, Memorial Hall, City Hall

216 Ontario Street, Kingston

 

WINDSOR, Nov 30, 6:00-8:00 PM, 400 City Hall Square East bldg, Windsor

 

HAMILTON, Dec 5, 6:00-8:00 PM, Council Chambers, Hamilton City Hall, 71 Main St West, Hamilton

 

THUNDER BAY, Dec 7, 6:00-8:00 PM, Council Chambers, City Hall, 500 Donald St East, Thunder Bay

 

For more info contact: Rick Findlay, Director, Water Program, Pollution Probe, 613-237-3485, rfindlay@pollutionprobe.org   or Dennis Draper, Office of the Environmental Commissioner of Ontario, 416-325-0530, dennis.draper@eco.on.ca 

 

The Pollution Probe's Vision Statement can be found at: www.pollutionprobe.org/Reports/greatlakesvision.pdf.


The opinions expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the GLSFC, its officers or staff. 

Reproduction of any material by paid-up members of the GLSFC is encouraged but appropriate credit must be given. 

Reproduction by others without written permission is prohibited.

arrowUSFWS Press Releases  arrowSea Grant News

State Fish Pages

Illinois - Indiana - Michigan - Minnesota - Ohio - Pennsylvania - New York - Wisconsin - Ontario

 

Home | Great Lakes States | Membership | Exotics Update | Great Links

Pending Issues | Regional News | Great Lakes Basin Report | Weekly News / Archives 


All contents Copyright © 1995 - 2006, GLSFC All Rights Reserved.

Site maintained by JJ Consulting