Week of December 11, 2006

 

National

Regional

General

2nd Amendment issues

Indiana

Michigan

Ohio

Pennsylvania

Wisconsin

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National

Omega-3, fibre, vitamin E linked to lower Lymphoma risk

12/7/2006- A diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids, dietary fibre, beta-carotene and vitamin E appear to offer significant protection against non-Hodgkin lymphoma, says a Swedish-Danish-American study.

 

The researchers behind the new study, led by Ellen Chang from the Northern California Cancer Center, looked at the dietary intakes of 591 people with non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) and certain lymphoma subtypes, and 460 healthy controls recruited from seven Swedish counties.  

 

“Overall, we found that eating fish and marine fats was associated with lower risk of overall non-Hodgkin lymphomas and certain lymphoma subtypes (which should be examined separately, since NHLs represent a group of several different lymphomas),” Dr. Chang told NutraIngredients.com.  “We also found that consuming certain antioxidant vitamins, commonly found in some fruits and vegetables, was associated with lower risk of overall NHL and some common subtypes.”

 

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma is a cancer that starts in the lymphatic system and encompasses about 29 different forms of lymphoma. According to the American Cancer Society, over 50,000 new cases are diagnosed in the US every year.

 

The participants were recruited between 2000 and 2002, and dietary assessments were performed using a validated, semi-quantitative 137-item (including supplements) food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). The researchers assumed that recent dietary habits had not changed significantly since the distant past.

 

After adjusting the results to eliminate potential confounding factors like gender and BMI, Chang and her colleagues report that, while dietary intake of most macronutrients was not associated with NHL risk, average consumption of about 0.8 grams per day (0.4 grams per 1,000 kcal) of omega-3 or marine fatty acids was associated with a 20 and 60 per cent reduced risk of NHL and its subtypes, compared to those who consumed about 0.2 grams per day.

 

This also extended to fish oil supplements, with people who supplemented their diet with fish oil at a significantly reduced risk of NHL and its subtypes than people who did not take the supplements (risk reduction of between 30 and 50%.

 

Strong associations between dietary fibre intake and NHL risk reductions were also observed, said the researchers in the American Journal of Epidemiology. Indeed, Daily average intake of 14.4 grams per 1,000 kcal was linked to a 50 to 60 per cent risk reduction of NHL and all its subtypes.

 

Dietary consumption of the micronutrients beta-carotene or  

alpha-tocopherol was also associated with lower NHL risk, said the researchers, with the highest dietary beta-carotene intake (average 4.4 micrograms per day) associated with 40 per cent reduction in NHL risk, compared to the lowest intake (average 1.2 micrograms per day). Similarly, the highest dietary alpha-tocopherol intake (average 9.8 milligrams per day) associated with 60 per cent reduction in NHL risk, compared to the lowest intake (average 5.0 milligrams per day).

 

Dr. Chang told this website, however, that some micronutrients were associated with an increased NHL risk: “We found that consuming calcium and retinol was associated with higher risk of NHL and its most common subtypes. We hypothesize that the latter finding may be because calcium and retinol block the formation of biologically active, hormonal vitamin D in the body, and we previously found that exposure to sunlight—which is the primary source of vitamin D for many people-- was associated with lower NHL risk (see Smedby et al., J Natl Cancer Inst 2005).

 

“Therefore, higher levels of vitamin D may protect against NHL risk, whereas lower levels of vitamin D may increase NHL risk,” she said.

 

The mechanism of the apparent protective effects of the nutrients was not investigated by the researchers, but they propose that nutrients which affect inflammation, vitamin D activity, oxidative DNA damage, or DNA methylation could be associated with NHL risk.

 

The study does have several limitations, the researchers noted, including the limited sample size, and the assumption that dietary patterns did not change significantly over time.  “Of course, these findings need to be replicated elsewhere, ideally in studies where diet is measured in a large group of healthy people, who are then followed over many years to find out who develops NHL later on,” said Chang.

 

Source: American Journal of Epidemiology

Volume 164, Issue 12, Pages 1222-1232; doi:10.1093/aje/kwj330

“Nutrient Intake and Risk of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma”

Authors: E.T. Chang, K.M. Bälter, A. Torrång, K. Ekström Smedby, M. Melbye, C. Sundström, B. Glimelius and H-O. Adami

 

Affiliations: Karolinska Institutet (Sweden), Northern California Cancer Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, Harvard School of Public Health, University of Uppsala (Sweden), Danish Epidemiology Science Center - Statens Serum Institut (Denmark).

 

Web Source: www.nutraingredients-usa.com/news/ng.asp?n=72600-omega-fibre-non-hodgkin-lymphoma


Regional

Weekly Great Lakes Water Levels for December 08

Lake Level Conditions: 

Lake Superior is currently 12 inches lower than it was a year ago, while the levels of the remaining lakes range from 4 to 12 inches higher than those of a year ago.  Currently, all of the lakes are in their period of seasonal decline.  Over the next month water levels are expected to fall 1 to 3 inches depending on the lake, see table below for details.  Lake Superior is expected to remain well below last year’s levels, while Lakes Michigan-Huron, St. Clair, Erie, and Ontario are predicted to remain near the water levels of a year ago. 

 

Current Outflows/Channel Conditions:

Flow in the St. Marys and St. Clair rivers is expected to be below average in December.  Outflow from the Detroit River is predicted to be near average for this month.  Flow in the Niagara River, as well as the St. Lawrence River, is expected to be above average.

 

Alerts:

Due to abnormally dry conditions on the Lake Superior basin

over the last five months, Lake Superior ’s water level is currently below chart datum and is expected to remain below datum through April.  Users of the Great Lakes, connecting channels and St. Lawrence River should keep informed of current conditions before undertaking any activities that could be affected by changing water levels.  Mariners should utilize navigation charts and refer to current water level readings.

 

 

Superior

Mich-Huron

St. Clair

Erie

Ontario

Levels for Dec 8

600.4

577.4

573.8

571.5

245.5

Datum, in ft

601.1

577.5

572.3

569.2

243.3

Diff in inches

-8

-2

+17

+27

+27

Diff last month

-2

+2

+2

+2

+2

Diff from last yr

-12

+4

+9

+12

+10


General

Advice to prevent Hypothermia

HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania's unseasonably warm weather will soon give way to cold, windy and wet weather, so Keith Snyder, Pennsylvania Game Commission Hunter-Trapper Education Division chief, is reminding hunters, trappers and other outdoors enthusiasts to plan well to avoid hypothermia.

 

"Anyone heading afield for the remainder of this year's rifle deer season or other late hunting and trapping seasons should be aware of the threat of hypothermia and how to combat it," Snyder said.  "Hypothermia occurs when exposure to the wind, cold and wetness drain heat from the body faster than it can be produced.

 

"Extreme cold is not required for hypothermia to develop, and most cases occur when the air temperature is between 30 and 50 degrees.  The best way to combat hypothermia is to dress properly and avoid getting wet."

 

A non-absorbent, wicking layer of underwear of polypropylene or similar synthetic, covered by layers of wool, and a waterproof shell would be good in most wet-weather situations.  The waterproof rain gear can be carried in a small pack, but should be put on before the other clothes become wet because once a person gets wet, he or she risks hypothermia.  A warm hat and gloves also help to prevent heat loss.

 

"Wet clothing should be exchanged for dry clothing as soon as possible, especially if it is windy," Snyder said.  "Getting out of the wind and rain promptly can mean the difference between a safe outing and a life-threatening ordeal."

 

One of the most important defenses against hypothermia is recognition and treatment of the early symptoms.  Uncontrolled shivering is the first signal of the onset of hypothermia.  It also is one of the few symptoms the victim may recognize.   

 

As hypothermia sets in, slurred speech, frequent stumbling, loss of manual dexterity, memory lapses, exhaustion and drowsiness occur.  Often a victim will not notice these signs, so hunting partners should watch each other when wind,

water or cold create the potential for hypothermia.

 

"It is wise to get out of the wind and cold, remove wet clothing, and warm the body before hypothermia sets in," Snyder said.  "Once the telltale symptoms are recognized, these steps are absolutely critical: Stop, take shelter, remove wet clothes and warm the body."

 

If only mild impairment is evident, warm drinks and dry clothes will probably solve the problem.  High-energy foods can help provide fuel for metabolic heat production.  Powdered sweetened gelatin mixed with warm water makes a high-energy emergency drink.  A warming fire or other heat source can help speed the recovery.  Wrapping a blanket or crawling into a sleeping bag, if available, also will speed recovery.

 

In advanced cases of hypothermia, drowsiness may lead to unconsciousness and, ultimately, death, unless action is taken to provide warmth.  In these cases, emergency medical assistance is needed as soon as possible.

 

Small open fires warming purposes or cooking are permitted on State Game Lands only at places where adequate precautions are taken to prevent the spread of fire.  Such fires must be attended at all times and completely extinguished before leaving the site of the fire. Open fires are prohibited when the fire index rating used by the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, is high, very high or extreme. A person causing a wildfire, in addition to possible criminal penalty, is liable for all damages, cost of extinguishing and fines.

 

The early warning signs of hypothermia results as the body shuts down circulation to the limbs and nonessential organs in an attempt to maintain the core temperature. As more energy is drained, survival becomes dependent upon stopping the outflow of heat and supplying warmth from external sources.

 

"Awareness of the signs followed by prompt attention to the problem can save lives," Snyder said.  "Keep hypothermia in mind whenever you are outdoors and the weather turns wet or cold."


Winter B.O.W. Weekend Offered in Upper Peninsula Feb 23-25

Women seeking the opportunity to develop their outdoor skills are invited to register for the Michigan Department of Natural Resources’ 4th annual Becoming an Outdoors-Woman (BOW) Winter Weekend, set for Feb. 23-25, at the Bay Cliff Health Camp in Big Bay, which is about 30 miles north of Marquette in the Upper Peninsula.

 

Participants can select from nearly a dozen outdoor-related activities including cross-country skiing, dog sledding, skijoring, snowmobiling, winter shelter building, ice fishing and reading the winter woods. Some indoor activities also are offered, such as archery, journaling and fly tying. Professional instructors will offer basic and advanced instruction tailored to the participant’s individual ability.

 

The $175 registration fee includes all food and lodging as well

as most equipment and supplies (except as noted in the registration materials). Participants are housed in comfortable, dorm-style facilities. The fee also includes many extra activities and evening access to the camp’s group sauna.

 

Becoming an Outdoors-Woman workshops are for women 18 years of age and older who wish to learn outdoor skills in a relaxed atmosphere. Those interested in participating are urged to register soon. Registration materials and course descriptions are posted on the DNR Web site at www.michigan.gov/dnr.  Click on the Learning Corner to locate the BOW page. For more information, contact Sharon Pitz at the DNR Marquette Operations Service Center at (906) 228-6561, or e-mail, pitzs@michigan.gov.

 

For more info on other BOW activities, click on the BOW logo at the bottom of the GLSFC’s home page.


2nd Amendment issues

Right to bear arms applies to militias only, city tells court

WASHINGTON (AP) - In a case that could shape firearms laws nationwide, attorneys for the District argued on December 7 that the Second Amendment's right to bear arms applies only to militias, not individuals. The city defended as constitutional its long-standing ban on handguns, a law that some gun opponents have advocated elsewhere. Civil liberties groups and pro-gun organizations say the ban in unconstitutional.

  

At issue in the case before a federal appeals court is whether the Second Amendment right to "keep and bear arms" applies to all people or only to "a well regulated militia." The Bush administration has endorsed individual gun-ownership rights, but the Supreme Court has never settled the issue.

   

If the dispute makes it to the high court, it would be the first case in nearly 70 years to address the amendment's scope. The court disappointed gun-owner groups in 2003 when it refused to take up a challenge to California's ban on high-powered weapons. In the D.C. case, a lower court judge told six city residents in 2004 that they did not have a constitutional right to own handguns. The plaintiffs include residents of high-crime neighborhoods who want guns for protection.

   

Courts have upheld bans on automatic weapons and sawed-

off shotguns but this case is unusual because it involves a prohibition on all handguns. Voters passed a similar ban in San Francisco last year but a judge ruled it violated state law. The D.C. case is not clouded by state law and hinges directly on the Constitution.

 

"We interpret the Second Amendment in military terms," said Todd Kim, the District's solicitor general, who told the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit that the city would also have had the authority to ban all weapons.

 

"Show me anybody in the 19th century who interprets the Second Amendment the way you do," Judge Laurence Silberman said. "It doesn't appear until much later, the middle of the 20th century."  Of the three judges, Judge Silberman was the most critical of Mr. Kim's argument and noted that, despite the law, handguns were common in the District.

   

Judge Silberman and Judge Thomas B. Griffith seemed to wrestle, however, with the meaning of the amendment's language about militias. If a well-regulated militia is no longer needed, they asked, is the right to bear arms still necessary?

"That's quite a task for any court to decide that a right is no longer necessary," Alan Gura, an attorney for the plaintiffs, replied. "If we decide that it's no longer necessary, can we erase any part of the Constitution?"


Indiana

New Indiana record Goldeye

A new state-record goldeye has been certified by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Brian Crockett from Terre Haute caught the Wabash River fish March 26. The fish weighed 2.16 pounds, and stretched a little more than 17 inches from lip to tail. The goldeye record has been

broken four times since 2003.

 

Goldeye resemble shad or herrings, and are found in the Mississippi River drainage and in Canada, where they are considered a delicacy.

 

 


Light goose conservation season: Feb. 1 to March 31

Indiana will again participate in the light goose conservation order during 2007. The season runs Feb. 1 to March 31, 2007. The conservation order will be effective statewide, except at Muscatatuck and Big Oaks national wildlife refuges.

 

"The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service believes light geese that primarily migrate through the Mississippi and Central flyways have been experiencing a rapid increase in population," said DNR waterfowl biologist Adam Phelps. "The large number of these geese is causing destruction of their arctic and sub-arctic breeding grounds. The conservation order is an attempt to reduce the population to prevent further habitat degradation and to ensure the long-term health of the population."

 

Lesser snow and Ross' geese are referred to as "light" geese due to the light coloration of the white-phase plumage form, as opposed to "dark" geese such as the white-fronted or

Canada goose. Both plumage forms of snow geese ("snow" and "blue") come under the designation light geese.

 

The same regulations and restrictions that apply during the regular waterfowl season also apply during the conservation order, except that during the order, (1) a free permit is required, (2) unplugged shotguns and electronic calling devices are allowed, (3) shooting hours are one-half hour before sunrise to one-half hour after sunset, (4) there is no daily bag or possession limit on lesser snow geese (includes blues) and Ross' geese.

 

In addition to the free permit, a valid hunting license and signed Indiana waterfowl stamp (unless hunter is exempt) are required. Neither a HIP registration number nor a federal duck stamp is required.  Beginning in January, free permits can be obtained at any state fish and wildlife area or reservoir office.


Michigan

Black Lake Sturgeon Spearing Guidelines Announced for 2007

The Michigan DNR announced the drawing guidelines for the 2007 Black Lake sturgeon spearing season.  Sturgeon spearing on Black Lake, located in Cheboygan and Presque Isle counties, will be limited to successful lottery participants selected by random drawing.

 

The Black Lake sturgeon spearing season opens Feb. 3, 2007, and runs through Feb. 11 or until the total harvest of five fish has been reached. Twenty-five tags will be issued on a daily basis to successful applicants until the maximum harvest level is reached or the season is completed.

 

Interested anglers may register for the spearing lottery during the Jan. 8-12 application period. To register, anglers should call the DNR Gaylord Operations Service Center at (989) 732-3541 or apply in person at the center between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. during the application period. All applicants 17 years and older must hold a valid Michigan fishing license. Those under 17 years old also may register for the season. Those applying for the drawing should have proper identification on hand during the application process. This may include a valid Michigan driver license, a Michigan ID card, a DNR sportcard or a valid Michigan fishing license.

 

A 7 p.m. drawing on Jan. 13 will be held at the Chateau North located at 10621 Twin Lakes Rd. in Cheboygan. A total of 225 anglers, or 25 per day, will be selected to fish Feb. 3-11.

Successful applicants will be notified of their date to fish by mail in advance of the season. The phone line at the Gaylord Operations Service Center will be updated each night after 7 p.m. and will list the successful anglers for the following day, as well as announce harvest results and if the season has closed. This information also will be posted on the DNR Web site at www.michigan.gov/dnr  under the Fishing section.

 

Successful anglers in the lottery drawing may fish between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. the day they are eligible to fish. A 36-inch minimum size limit applies. Anglers will receive a tag and marking flags issued in their name for their day of fishing. These materials may be picked up at the Onaway DNR field office beginning at 7 a.m. each day. The field office is located four and one-quarter miles north of Onaway on M-211. These materials must be returned to the same location by 6 p.m. each day. Anglers wishing to call the Onaway office during the spearing season can call (989) 733-8775.

 

Fishing tags are not transferable and anglers must present proper identification when picking up materials. Unclaimed fishing tags will be made available to anglers present at the registration station by means of a secondary drawing to begin each fishing day at 10 a.m. Thus, anglers have the potential to fish both one time in the primary drawing and one time in the secondary drawing.

 

For more information, contact the Gaylord Operations Service Center at (989) 732-3541.


DNR Invites Deer Hunters to Participate in Online Survey

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is asking for help from deer hunters. Accurate and complete information on hunting activity is vital for sound deer management. To obtain more hunting-related information, the DNR is offering a new option for deer hunters to report their hunting activity over the Internet.

 

Beginning last week, all deer hunters are invited to complete an online survey. The survey is available on the DNR Web site at www.michigan.gov/dnr  under the Hunting and the Deer sections.

 

The DNR is requesting information from all deer hunting license buyers, even if they did not hunt or harvest a deer this year. In addition, hunters should complete the survey only after

they have finished deer hunting for the 2006 license year.

Once hunters submit their answers, changes or additions will not be allowed.

 

“Last year, we held 21 public meetings across the state in relation to deer population goals,” said Bill Moritz, Wildlife Division chief. “One of the constant themes was that hunters wanted to provide the DNR with feedback on their deer season, from the number of animals they saw to their harvest success.”

 

Traditionally, the DNR has estimated deer hunter effort and success using surveys that were mailed to a sample of randomly selected hunters in scientifically designed manner. The traditional mail surveys will continue; however, the new online reporting option allows all hunters with Internet access to participate.


Winter Naturalist Programs Offered at Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park

Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park, located on the south shore of Lake Superior near Silver City in Ontonagon County, is offering guided snowshoe hikes and cross-country skiing by lantern light again this winter. All programs are free of charge.

 

“This place is incredible in the winter,” said Park Interpreter Bob Wild. “What better way to see the park and experience winter, than by participating in one of these naturalist-lead programs.”

 

Snowshoeing the Union River Area: Dec. 28 and 30, 2006, and Jan. 3, 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2007. Each program begins at 2 p.m. EST. Bring your snowshoes or borrow a pair from the park. This 90-minute guided hike is of moderate difficulty and meanders through the wildlife-rich hills, ridges and ravines of the scenic Union River. Meet at the Winter Union River Cabin parking area (near park headquarters).

 

Deer Yard Snowshoe Hike: Feb. 3, 10, 17 and 24 at 2 p.m. EST. Snowshoe among old-growth hemlocks and cedars to learn about deer wintering habits while seeing some of the

most beautiful areas of the park. Bring your snowshoes or borrow a pair from the park. This 90-minute hike is of moderate difficulty. Meet at the Whitetail Cabin parking Area (just past the ski hill). Bring your camera.

 

Lantern Light Cross-Country Skiing: Dec. 28 and 30, 2006, and Jan. 3, 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2007, from 6-9 p.m. EST; also Feb. 3, 10, 17 and 24 from 6:30-9 p.m. Old-fashioned kerosene lanterns illuminate the trail during this night ski. Lanterns are placed along the entire one-mile loop for a unique and memorable skiing experience. Stop about halfway around the loop at the warming shelter where the park naturalist will have a campfire going. This trail has an “easy” difficulty rating; however, skiing at night is always a challenge.

 

For more information on winter recreation opportunities at Porcupine Mountains Wilderness State Park, call (906) 885-5275 or visit www.mi.gov/porkies.

 

All motor vehicles entering a Michigan State Park or Recreation Area must display a Motor Vehicle Permit, available for purchase at the park entrance. Cost is $24 for a resident annual and $6 for a resident daily. Nonresident annual is $29 and a nonresident daily is $8.


Proposed Changes for Fishing Tournament Permits

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources will host three meetings this month to provide information and receive public comment on proposed changes to procedures for obtaining fishing tournament permits at DNR boating access sites.

 

The DNR issues nearly 700 permits each year for tournaments, primarily in southern Michigan. The proposed changes focus on reducing the number of boating access sites requiring permits, expanding monitoring efforts by staff and making adjustments to the procedures.

 

The meeting dates and locations are:

► Tuesday, Dec. 12, 3-5 PM., Gerald E. Eddy Discovery

Center, 17030 Bush Rd, between Pierce and McClure roads, in the Waterloo State Recreation Area, Chelsea.

► Monday, Dec. 18, 6-8 PM., Wolf Lake Fish Hatchery Visitor Center, 34720 County Rd 652, Mattawan. The hatchery is located at Hatchery Road and M-43, six miles west of US-131.

► Wednesday, Dec. 20, 6-8 PM., at Gander Mountain, 43825 West Oaks Drive, Novi.

 

DNR staff will present a history of the tournament procedure and discuss proposed changes, including new scheduling procedures and the collection of tournament fish data. Time also will be made available for questions regarding the proposed changes in this process.


Hunting and Fishing License Program Development Work Group Report OKd by NRC

Legislature must now approve recommendations and fee increases

Keith Charters, chairman of the Michigan Natural Resource Commission introduced the report by saying that if the hunting and fishing license fee structure is not changed have an $8 million deficit by 2008 and up to $40 million deficit by 2010. "A solution is imperative", said Charters.

 

A Work Group was appointed consisting of 19 members from various constituent and conservation groups across Michigan. Commissioner Frank Wheatlake chaired the Work Group.

 

The Work Group was asked to recommend changes in hunting and fishing license fees to sustain Michigan’s conservation efforts; and to reach out to a broader group of conservation and outdoor recreation stakeholders for input and assistance in communicating the need in the legislative process.

 

Eight recommendations were established:

1. Restore cuts from previous two years

2. Accomplish targeted additions to meet emerging needs

3. Provide limited discounts to seniors (20%) and youth (50%)

4. Charge higher fees to non-residents

5. Lower age to 16 for fishing license

6. Provide DNR authority to discount all licenses

7. Support inclusion of youth (under 16) fishing catch as part of accompanying adult’s fishing bag limit unless youth has voluntary fishing license

8. Work with conservation interests to craft long-term, stable funding for conservation in Michigan

 

The Commission unanimously approved the recommendations at the regular meeting of the NRC. The next step will be to introduce the recommendations to the Legislature for action by the Legislature. Development of a sustainable funding source will be the top priority. When 2007 NRC goals are developed, the highest priority will be to develop sustainable funding for conservation program.

 

Charters said that passage of the Hunting and Fishing License Package Development Work Group recommendations will be the highest goal.


Ohio

Light goose conservation season: Feb. 1 to March 31

Indiana will again participate in the light goose conservation order during 2007. The season runs Feb. 1 to March 31, 2007. The conservation order will be effective statewide, except at Muscatatuck and Big Oaks national wildlife refuges.

 

"The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service believes light geese that primarily migrate through the Mississippi and Central flyways have been experiencing a rapid increase in population," said DNR waterfowl biologist Adam Phelps. "The large number of these geese is causing destruction of their arctic and sub-arctic breeding grounds. The conservation order is an attempt to reduce the population to prevent further habitat degradation and to ensure the long-term health of the population."

 

Lesser snow and Ross' geese are referred to as "light" geese due to the light coloration of the white-phase plumage form, as opposed to "dark" geese such as the white-fronted or

Canada goose. Both plumage forms of snow geese ("snow" and "blue") come under the designation light geese.

 

The same regulations and restrictions that apply during the regular waterfowl season also apply during the conservation order, except that during the order, (1) a free permit is required, (2) unplugged shotguns and electronic calling devices are allowed, (3) shooting hours are one-half hour before sunrise to one-half hour after sunset, (4) there is no daily bag or possession limit on lesser snow geese (includes blues) and Ross' geese.

 

In addition to the free permit, a valid hunting license and signed Indiana waterfowl stamp (unless hunter is exempt) are required. Neither a HIP registration number nor a federal duck stamp is required.  Beginning in January, free permits can be obtained at any state fish and wildlife area or reservoir office.


New Recreation Marine Loan Program improves boat access     

Open application process underway

COLUMBUS, OH - Applications are being accepted year round for the new Recreation Marine Loan Program, which aims to help develop new recreational marinas and enhance existing marina facilities across the state, according to the Ohio DNR.

       

The Recreation Marine Loan Program establishes a financial relationship between the ODNR Division of Watercraft, qualified marina facility owners and private lending institutions. The division provides an economic incentive for private lenders to lower the interest rate to the borrower by placing a linked deposit with the lending institution. In order to maintain the linked deposit, participating marinas must meet annual performance indicators established by the division to insure the facility is properly maintained and operated according to strict safety and public access guidelines.

        

“By obtaining pre-approval from the Division of Watercraft at

any time, a marina owner can now apply for a low-interest loan from a private lending institution, making marina development more affordable,” said Michael E. Quinn, acting chief of the ODNR Division of Watercraft. “This program offers a very creative solution to the biggest problem identified by Ohio boaters, which is improved boating access.”

 

Project amenities eligible for funding through this program include construction of docks, breakwaters, vehicle parking and boating facility infrastructure improvements, erosion control, construction dredging, land acquisition and certain types of engineering costs.

       

Project activities not eligible for inclusion in the program include planning and feasibility studies, conceptual engineering and design, administrative fees, attorney fees and maintenance costs.

       

An application form and additional information are available at www.ohiodnr.com.


Trout fishing opportunities for anglers at Castalia Fish Hatchery      

COLUMBUS, OH - Controlled trout-fishing opportunities on Cold Creek, one of Ohio’s most unique streams, again await fishing enthusiasts who enter a special lottery conducted by the Ohio DNR Division of Wildlife.         

 

A half-mile section of the creek, located at the Castalia State Fish Hatchery in Erie County, will again be open to a limited number of anglers on selected dates between April 2 and October 26 next year.  Those anglers interested in fishing the stream must submit an application form, along with a non-refundable $3 application fee, by January 31 in order to be eligible for the random drawing. Application information can be obtained from the ODNR Division of Wildlife web site at ohiodnr.com/wildlife or by calling 1-800-WILDLIFE. Successful applicants will be notified by mail of their fishing dates.

       

There will be two seasons: one for adults (April 2 through June 6 and August 20 through October 26), and one for youths age 16 and under (June 7 through August 17). Individuals selected to participate will be allowed to bring along two other

adults and three youths under the age of 16 (no more than six people total).

 

Special fishing rules will be in effect for this event to ensure that a quality fishing experience is maintained throughout the season. One of these special rules prohibits catch and release fishing, with wildlife officials requiring that anglers keep all fish they catch. The daily bag limit will be five trout per angler.

 

Anglers selected for the trout fishing will have their names posted on the division’s web site and will also be notified by mail of their selection.  Anglers will be required to check in at the hatchery upon arrival and check out at the end of their session. Fishing sessions will be open from 7 a.m. to noon. Anglers age 16 and older will need a valid 2007 Ohio fishing license.

       

An Ohio resident annual fishing license costs $19; a one-day fishing license costs $11. Those who purchase a one-day fishing license may later return it to a license agent to receive credit toward purchase of an annual fishing license.


Pennsylvania

Hunting and Trapping opportunities for winter

HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania Game Commission Executive Director Carl G. Roe reminds hunters and trappers that they have a mixed bag of seasons from which to choose.  Seasons include deer, snowshoe hares, ruffed grouse, squirrels, cottontails, pheasants, coyotes, furbearers, crows, doves and waterfowl.

 

The statewide late archery and flintlock muzzleloader deer seasons, and late antlerless deer season for Wildlife Management Unit (WMU) 2B run concurrently from Dec. 26 to Jan. 13.  Also, the late antlerless deer season in WMUs 5C and 5D runs from Dec. 11-23 and from Dec. 26-Jan. 27.

 

The small game seasons are as follows: squirrel, Dec. 11-23 and Dec. 26 to Feb. 3; ruffed grouse, Dec. 11-23 and Dec. 26

to Jan. 27; rabbit, Dec. 11-23 and Dec. 26 to Feb. 3; and

snowshoe hare, Dec. 26-Jan. 1. In addition, male and female pheasant hunting will be available from Dec. 11-23 and Dec. 26 to Feb. 3, in WMUs 1A, 1B, 2D, 2E, 2F, 2G, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 4A, 4B and 4D.

 

Hunters who participate in any of these seasons must have a general hunting license, which provides Pennsylvania hunting privileges through June 30.  Depending on the deer season hunters are participating in, they also must meet additional licensing and fluorescent orange requirements. Any hunter carrying a sporting arm during the deer seasons must have an unused deer harvest tag.

 

For a complete list of opportunities, go to: www.pgc.state.pa.us and click on Release #158-06.


Cops nab non-resident poachers

FRANKLIN - On Nov. 30, an anonymous tip from a concerned citizen led Pennsylvania Game Commission Wildlife Conservation Officer Mario Piccirilli to a farm along Turkey Track Road in Conneautville, Crawford County.  The information WCO Piccirilli received indicated that five non-resident hunters were illegally shooting deer. 

 

A search of the area resulted in nine illegal deer being confiscated and five individuals being charged with 15 counts of Game and Wildlife Code violations.  Their fines totaled $7,500, plus court costs. The individuals were taken into custody and arraigned before District Justice Lincoln Zilhaver and, after failing to post bond, were committed to the Crawford County Jail.  The defendants posted bond and pled guilty to all charges at District Justice Rita Marwoods' office in Linesville.

 

WCO Piccirilli was assisted by Deputy WCOs Larry Hergenroeder and John Ittel, Erie County WCO Michael Wojtecki, Crawford County Land Management Group Supervisor Jerry Bish and Northwest Region Director Keith Harbaugh.

 

The defendants and their penalties are:

Bryan Scott Patterson, age 34, of Madisonville, Tennessee, pled guilty to two counts of unlawful taking or possession of game or wildlife and one charge of Unlawful killing or taking of big game, and fined $1,500 plus court costs;

 

Steven Raymond Belk, age 42, of Athens, Tennessee, pled guilty to two counts of unlawful taking or possession of game or wildlife and one charge of unlawful killing or taking of big game, and fined $1,500 plus court costs;

 

Jeffrey Pernel Millsaps, age 30, of Madisonville, Tennessee, pled guilty to two counts of unlawful taking or possession of game or wildlife and one charge of unlawful killing or taking of big game, and fined fine $1,500 plus court costs;

 

Clifford Lee Williams Jr., age 34, of Madisonville, Tennessee, pled guilty to three counts of unlawful taking or possession of game or wildlife and one count of unlawful killing or taking of big game, and fined $2,000 plus court costs; and

 

Kevin Michael Rushing, age 27, of Oskaloosa, Iowa, pled guilty to one count of unlawful taking or possession of game or wildlife and one charge of unlawful killing or taking of big game, and fined $1,000 plus court costs.


Wisconsin

Wisconsin public hearings on tournament permits & fees

Requires a permit for all tournaments consisting of 20 boats or 100 participants on lakes,

The Wisconsin DNR late last month, held public hearings relating to regulations of fishing tournaments in inland, outlying and boundary waters of Wisconsin. 

           

Draft language of the new rules show permit fees will range from $10 to $450, depending on the size (number of tournament registrants) of each tournament. It was not clear what, if any benefits, tournament planners would receive in return for fees paid. It was also not spelled out who would benefit from the fees paid, or whether fees would be relegated as dedicated funds for fishery or stocking programs or go into the Wisconsin general fund.

           

Wisconsin regulations require the department to promulgate rules to establish a program to authorize and regulate fishing tournaments. Under the proposed rules, new fishing tournament permit requirements are established so that if a fishing tournament consists of 20 boats or 100 participants or targets trout on classified trout streams or is a live release tournament with an off-site weigh-in or has prizes of $10,000 or more, a permit from the department is required.

           

If none of those criteria are met, no permit is required. Fishing tournament permit fees are established to cover the cost of the program, estimated to be $76,000 annually, which includes permit application review and approval, catch report review, database entry, law enforcement, and data collection. In addition fees will include an additional $18,000 for five years to recover the cost of the bass fishing tournament pilot program.

           

Two alternatives for fee structures will be presented at public hearings. The first alternative seeks to collect $94,000 annually by charging tournament organizers permit application fees ranging from $200 to $850 based on the size of the

tournament. The second alternative seeks to collect fishing tournament permit application fees from organizers and annual fishing tournament participant permits from open-water tournament participants.

 

Permit application fees for organizers would range from $50 to $475 based on tournament size and $10 for each participant permit. These estimates assume 400 fishing tournament permits annually and 5,500 open water fishing tournament participants. This rule establishes a permit application process by which the department will accept applications for permits from August 1 through Sept. 30 each year. Applications received during that period that result in limits on the number of tournaments on a water being exceeded will be subjected to a lottery for the date and location.

 

Prior to the lottery drawing, organizers will be informed and offered an opportunity to modify their application to a date or location where limits have not been reached. Limits on the size and number of fishing tournaments are proposed in this rule. Limits on lakes vary depending on lake size and are based on public access standards set forth in s. NR 1.91(5)(b), Wis. Adm. Code. Limits on the Mississippi River are similar to those in place in Minnesota. The rule prohibits live release fishing tournaments during July and August.

           

The rule also establishes other requirements of tournament organizers, including requiring a plan for disposal of dead fish and for preventing the spread of aquatic invasive species. Penalties are included for tournament organizers that do not comply with their plans. The rule establishes other general provisions related to fishing tournament format, fish holding and handling.

 

For a summary of the Wisconsin Draft Rules and Draft Language on tournaments, go to: http://dnr.wi.gov/org/water/fhp/fish/fishingtournaments/

fishtournruledev.htm


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