Week of August 15, 2011

Hunting & Shooting Products/Issues
National

Regional

2nd Amendment Issues
Lake Erie
Lake Superior

Illinois
Indiana
Minnesota
New York
Ohio
Wisconsin
Other Breaking News Items

 

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       New Product  Archives

Hunting & Shooting Products/Issues

Weaver unveils Tactical Scopes w/Illuminated reticules, & specialized tactical accessories

ONALASKA, WI - Weaver® introduces new tactical optics and accessories. These tactical products are precision machined to the strictest tolerances to perform in adverse conditions. The new accessories are made in the U.S.A. Tactical optics and accessories are now available.

Whether in-competition or on-duty, Weaver understands there is no room for error. That’s why Weaver engineered, designed and tested these tactical products to perform under the most severe conditions. They feature fully multi-coated lenses and a one-piece, 30mm Argon purged tube. Waterproof, shockproof and fog-proof tolerances deliver proven, rugged performance. And, new tactical accessories (MSRP: $37.95 - $100.49) enable precision shooters to outfit their firearms for each mission.

Tactical shooters can sight-in from a distance with new long and intermediate range scopes. These scopes boast advanced technology and ten illumination settings. First focal plane reticules and aggressive knurling provide fast,  

precise aiming. Aircraft-grade aluminum construction achieves greater strength and positive weight reduction.

 

Mounting Systems
Four new tactical accessories are ideal for upgrading AR-style rifles. First, the Picatinny Riser Set minimizes weight and bulk while delivering optimal mounting height for a wide range of optic/ring combinations. Second, the full-length AR-15 Flat Top Riser Rail features 20 MOA of vertical cant to enable extended optics range adjustments.

 

The Weaver Tactical SPR (Special Purpose Rifle) 30mm Optics Mount delivers solid holding-power to withstand aggressive recoil. Hand-adjustable knobs enable no-tool installation and removal. The last new addition to the tactical lineup is Weaver’s Fixed Back-Up Iron Sight. It features no vertical or horizontal point-of-impact shift when switching from precision to CQB aperture, keeping shooters on target and in the action.

To learn more about the new optics, accessories and search through the complete Weaver lineup, visit www.WeaverOptics.com

800-635-7656  tech.expert@atk.com


National

National Task Force tackles Carp issue

A Twin Cities-based Asian Carp Task Force brought together in January by National Park Service officials with the Mississippi National River and Recreation Area, will immediately begin planning for a new round of eDNA testing in both rivers.

 

Made up of federal, state and local partners, the task force was responsible for initiating the most recent round of eDNA testing, which cost about $17,000. Two nonprofit organizations funded the testing. The St. Paul-based Mississippi River Fund contributed $10,000 and St. Croix National Scenic Riverway Fund of the St. Croix Valley Foundation contributed $7,200. The St. Croix Valley Fdtn is based in Hudson, WI.

 

The St. Croix Falls Dam and Lock and Dam 1 on the Mississippi River were chosen as sites for the initial round of eDNA testing because they are river barriers where Asian carp might accumulate, and they are located further upstream than where most commercial fishing and routinely conducted DNR surveys take place. The next round of testing will occur above those dams and elsewhere in the two rivers. Scientists want to test for Asian carp above Lock and Dam 1 in St. Paul and above St. Anthony Falls in Minneapolis.

 

“Our task is to stop or slow down these fish as far south as possible while we continue to develop technologies and techniques to slow down their spread,” said Paul Labovitz, superintendent of the Mississippi National River & Recreation Area. 

 

Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton recently signed a bonding bill, approved by the Minnesota Legislature, funding a $16 million upgrade of the Coon Rapids Dam on the Mississippi River. The dam improvements are designed to provide a permanent barrier to the upstream migration of Asian carp to the upper reaches of the Mississippi River. Construction should begin 2012.

 

DNR fisheries experts say silver carp are extremely skittish and difficult to catch with traditional netting and fish-shocking equipment.

However, two DNR fisheries biologists recently returned from the Illinois River, where they received first-hand training from commercial fishing operators in capturing Asian carp, which have established significant populations there. The training will prove valuable as the DNR begins its own search for the species on the St. Croix.   View study.

 


Rasmussen Poll: Most Americans say Climate Scientists falsify data

A new Rasmussen poll shows 69% of Americans say it is at least somewhat likely that some scientists have falsified research data to support their own theories and beliefs, including 40 percent who say it is “very likely” scientists have done so. Only 22 % of poll respondents do not think it is likely that some scientists have falsified research data, with 10 % undecided.

 

According to Rasmussen Reports, “While a majority of Americans nationwide continue to acknowledge significant disagreement about global warming in the scientific community, most go even further to say some scientists falsify data to support their own beliefs.”

 

A powerful reason for growing public awareness of potential flaws in global warming claims, according to Rasmussen Reports, is recent news coverage of a peer-reviewed study documenting how NASA satellite data show more heat is escaping into space than United Nations computer models have predicted.

“The debate over global warming has intensified in recent weeks after a new NASA study was interpreted by skeptics to reveal that global warming is not man-made,” Rasmussen Reports observed.

 

According to Rasmussen Reports, the number of adults who say it’s likely scientists have falsified data is up 10 percentage points from December 2009.

 

“Republicans and adults not affiliated with either major political party feel stronger than Democrats that some scientists have falsified data to support their global warming theories, but 51% of Democrats also agree,” observed Rasmussen Reports.

 

On a related issue, 57 percent of Americans say there is significant disagreement within the scientific community about global warming, up five percentage points from late 2009. Only 25 percent of Americans believe scientists agree on global warming. Another 18 percent are undecided.

SOURCE: Rasmussen Reports


Regional

No Asian Carp Found in Lake Calumet after intensive monitoring

"Our rapid response plan did what it was designed to do" J. Goss

CHICAGO- The Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee (ACRCC) last week detailed the results of intensive monitoring efforts in and around Lake Calumet within the Chicago Area Waterway System (CAWS) and announced no Asian carp were seen or captured during a four-day response.  

 

The ACRCC began a Level 1 monitoring response under its Monitoring and Rapid Response Plan on Monday, August 1, after three consecutive rounds of Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling yielded positive results for Asian carp DNA in and around Lake Calumet.  At present, eDNA evidence cannot verify whether live Asian carp are present, whether the DNA may have come from a dead fish, or whether water containing Asian carp DNA may have been transported from other sources, such as bilge water.  While the Lake Calumet area is regularly monitored for the presence of Asian carp, a level 1 response intensified efforts over a four-day period of time with commercial fishing crews, electrofishing boats, larger sweeping nets called seines, and additional sampling gear such as tandem trap nets and hydro acoustic surveys to determine whether live Asian carp were present in the area.

 

“Our rapid response plan did what it was designed to do – use aggressive monitoring and the best available technology to confirm there is no establishing population of Asian carp above the electric barrier.  We will continue to follow our comprehensive Asian carp control strategy to aggressively monitor the Chicago Area Waterway System, ensure the security of the electric barrier, and use and develop the most advanced technologies to protect the Great Lakes from Asian carp,”  said John Goss, Asian Carp Director for the White House Council on Environmental Quality. 

 

The Lake Calumet response action concluded on August 4, 2011 after more than 1,066 person-hours on the water using a crew of 38 state and Federal agency biologists and commercial fishermen aboard 11 vessels.  A variety of nets and methods were used during the operation, including gill/trammel netting, electrofishing, tandem-trap netting, and hydro acoustic surveys.  In total, crews fished more than 11 miles of gill/trammel nets, eight fyke nets, and completed 22.5 hours of electrofishing.  In all, 8,668 fish were collected, including large numbers of buffalo and gizzard shad, indicating that fish that share Asian carp habitat preferences were being trapped and identified.

 

“These crews worked tirelessly during this operation using the best fishing techniques available to try to find Asian carp.  The fact that none were found further supports what we have believed for some time – if there are any Asian carp in this area above the barrier, they are there in very small numbers,” said Illinois Department of Natural resources Assistant Director John Rogner.

 

The monitoring response was designed to intensify resources and use the best available technology to search for live Asian carp in the Lake Calumet area.  Eight previous monitoring trips to Lake Calumet since March

2011 with various agencies electrofishing and using contracted commercial fishers have identified 4,500 fish and indicated no Asian carp presence. 

 

The ACRCC remains vigilant in continually confirming the effectiveness of the electric barrier, including implementing new Didson camera technology, telemetery, and other barrier defense and monitoring actions.  The ACRCC continues to assess and prevent all possible modes of travel for Asian carp to Lake Calumet, including human release of live carp, flood connections between area lakes and the CAWS, and the possibility a small number of Asian carp traveling to the area prior to the 2002 installation of the electric barrier. Extensive ACRCC monitoring using the best available technologies and expert fish biologists has consistently indicated that if any Asian carp are present above the electric barrier in the CAWS, they exist in extremely low numbers that do not approach the levels necessary for them to establish a population.

 

The threat from Asian carp has generated an urgent and committed government response.  In addition to aggressive monitoring and sampling, the ACRCC has proactively worked to contain Asian carp in the Chicago Area Waterway System by constructing a third electric barrier in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, constructing a 13-mile physical barrier along the Des Plaines River to prevent fish bypass during flooding, and researching control technology and methods that can be tailored and applied to control Asian carp.

 

The Obama Administration also remains focused on preventing Asian carp from entering the Great Lakes through all possible pathways.  The ACRCC released an “Other Pathways” study in December 2010 to identify and close off other potential aquatic pathways where Asian carp could enter the Great Lakes basin; constructed a 1,500 foot fish barrier fence at Eagle Marsh in Indiana to prevent fish from migrating from the Wabash River into the Great Lakes watershed; and continues to develop the Great Lakes Mississippi River Interbasin Study to assess threats throughout the basin, including in the CAWS. 

 

The Obama Administration formed the Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee in 2009 to ensure coordinated and comprehensive action against Asian carp. The ACRCC is led by the White House Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and includes the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation and all eight Great Lakes states, as well as the Great Lakes Fishery Commission, the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago, and the City of Chicago. 

 

Asian carp monitoring and response activities are federally funded through the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative and Federal agency budgets.  To read the 2011 Monitoring and Rapid Response Plan or for more information on the 2011 Asian Carp Control Strategy Framework, visit: www.asiancarp.org

 


Coast Guard, DNR cops bust illegal charter boat operations

Personnel from the U.S. Coast Guard and the IDNR wrapped up a joint operation last week intended to deter illegal charter boat operations occurring in the downtown-Chicago area.

 

Coast Guardsmen and IDNR DNR cops teamed up in response to multiple reports by local licensed charter captains that recreational vessels appeared to be operating illegal charters in the Chicago area.

 

One of those reports prompted Coast Guard and IDNR personnel to investigate a vessel reportedly carrying passengers for hire on the Chicago River and Lake Michigan. Upon return from a trip, personnel from both agencies boarded the vessel. During the course of the boarding, it was determined 15 passengers paid the captain of the unlicensed and uninspected vessel for a three-hour tour on Lake Michigan.

 

As in most cases, the illegal charter had been arranged through an online buy-and-sell advertisement website. Coast Guard investigators issued the owner of the vessel a Notice of Violations with a total proposed penalty of $2,350. The maximum penalty the Coast Guard can issue depends on the specific violation and can range from $110 to $32,500. Since the captain of the vessel was not a U.S. Coast Guard licensed captain, conservation police issued separate citations for violations of state laws to both the captain and the owner of the vessel.

 

The operation of a charter vessel without the required vessel documents and operator license is a violation of federal law, and if caught, the captain could be subject to criminal or civil liability. The regulations are in place to help ensure the safety of passengers. Illegal charter boats are typically recreational vessels and are generally operated by a person without the required Coast Guard-issued captain’s license.  

 

Coast Guard-issued captain’s licenses demonstrate that the captain of a commercial vessel has met requirements in navigation and seamanship rules. The Coast Guard advises the public to ask the boat’s captain to show them his or her original Coast Guard license.  If the boat is carrying more than six passengers, it is required to be inspected by the Coast Guard, and the Certificate of Inspection should be displayed in an area accessible to passengers. The Certificate of Inspection shows a vessel has met the minimum Coast Guard safety; and sets the maximum number of passengers the vessel can carry.

 

If the public wants to verify a captain’s license or the inspected status of a vessel carrying more than six passengers, or to report an illegal charter operation, they can call Coast Guard Sector Lake Michigan 24/7 at 414-747-7182.   The joint operation was an extension of the partnership developed during this year’s Chicago Public Safety Campaign.

 

 


Great Lakes Water Levels for August 12, 2011 

WEATHER CONDITIONS

The Great Lakes basin started the week off with light showers and average temperatures which stayed consistent as the week progressed. A broad area of low pressure will move through the Ohio Valley, causing temperatures to decrease over the weekend and a chance of thunderstorms is possible starting Friday evening through Sunday afternoon. Early next week dry weather will resume with clear skies and temperatures warming back up into the mid 80s.

LAKE LEVEL CONDITIONS

Currently, Lake Superior is 4 inches above its level of a year ago and Lake Michigan-Huron is near last year's level.  Lakes St. Clair, Erie, and Ontario are 5, 8, and 2 inches, respectively, higher than they were at this time last year. Over the next thirty days, Lake Superior is projected to rise 1 inch and Lake Michigan-Huron is expected to fall about an inch.  The water levels of Lakes St. Clair, Erie and Ontario are forecasted to decline 7, 6, and 6 inches, respectively, over the next month. 

FORECASTED MONTHLY OUTFLOWS/CHANNEL CONDITIONS

Lake Superior's outflow through the St. Mary's River is projected to be below average for the month of August.  The outflows from Lake Huron into the St. Clair River, and from Lake St. Clair into the Detroit River, are expected to

be below average throughout the month of August.  Lake Erie's outflow through the Niagara River is predicted to be above average and the outflow of Lake Ontario into the St. Lawrence River is predicted to be above average.

ALERTS

Users of the Great Lakes, connecting channels and St. Lawrence River should keep informed of current conditions before undertaking any activities that could be affected by changing water levels.  Mariners should utilize navigation charts and refer to current water level readings.

 

 

Superior

Mich-Huron

St. Clair

Erie

Ontario

Level for Aug 12

601.35

578.28

574.77

572.24

246

Datum, in ft

601.10

577.50

572.30

569.20

243.30

Diff in inches

+3

+9

+30

+36

+32

Diff last month

+2

0

-1

-3

-7

Diff from last yr

+4

0

+5

+8

+2


2nd Amendment Issues

Firearms sales still brisk

According to data from the National Shooting Sports Foundation, people in this country – despite the economy – are buying increasing numbers of firearms. There was an

8.3 % rise in the number of background checks with the National Instant Check System in July over the same month last year. This has been going on now for 14 straight months, according to the data.


Lake Superior

Lake Superior Fish Recipes Sought

The deadline for entering Minnesota Sea Grant’s recipe contest is approaching.  Send in your hors d’ouevre recipe involving Lake Superior's commercially harvested whitefish, lake herring, deepwater ciscoes and lake trout by August 22, 2011. You can enter online (http://seagrant.umn.edu/fisheries/recipecontest) or you can send your entries by e-mail (seagr@d.umn.edu) or snail-mail, typed or written legibly with a phone number, to:

 

Spilly's Lake Superior Recipe Contest

Minnesota Sea Grant

144 Chester Park

31 West College Street

Duluth, MN 55812

 

People who are involved in the production of food or recipes for pay as well as Minnesota Sea Grant employees’ households are ineligible. Recipes must reflect hors

d’ouevres portioning and must include at least one of the

following ingredients: whitefish, lake herring, deepwater ciscoes, and lake trout.  Prizes include gift certificates from Lou’s Fish Smoke House, Northern Waters Smokehaus, and the University of Minnesota Bookstore. Several cookbooks will also be given away.

 

Minnesota Sea Grant is sponsoring this recipe contest in honor of the 100th birthday of Sea Grant founder and longtime dean at the University of Minnesota, Athelstan Spilhaus. (1911-1998). Spilhaus believed in using aquatic resources sustainability, a concept that Sea Grant continues to embrace.

 

For details about the recipe contest, visit http://seagrant.umn.edu/fisheries/recipecontest or call Russell Habermann at Minnesota Sea Grant (218-726-8710).


Lake Erie

Coast Guard saves 4 after charter fishing boat hits Ashtabula breakwall

Accident is the third in one week a vessel has struck a Lake Erie breakwall

Coast Guardsmen from Station Ashtabula, Ohio, rescued four people after the charter fishing boat they were aboard, struck a breakwall in Ashtabula Harbor before sunrise Aug. 8, 2011. The allision is the third time a vessel has struck a breakwall in Lake Erie in a week.

 

A passing vessel used a VHF-FM marine radio to notify personnel in the Coast Guard Sector Buffalo command center of the accident at 4:45 a.m. A boat crew from Station Ashtabula immediately launched in a 33-foot Special Purpose Craft-Law Enforcement boat and five minutes later arrived at the site of the accident, where they found the captain and three 

passengers aboard the vessel, Sweet Fish, in their life jackets.

 

The boat crew brought the three men, ages 66, 53, and 24 and woman, 48, aboard the SPC-LE and took them to a public dock in Ashtabula, where emergency medical technicians were waiting. EMTs evaluated the woman, who complained of head, neck, back and foot injuries, and transported her to a local hospital for further evaluation. The three men refused medical treatment.

 

This accident is the third time in one week a vessel has struck a breakwall in Lake Erie. “We can’t stress enough how important it is for boaters to be familiar with the areas where they’re operating, especially in times of low light or limited visibility,” said Lt. Thomas Pequignot of the Coast Guard Sector Buffalo incident management division. “Navigating by sight alone, without the help of nautical charts and other navigation equipment, is incredibly risky and puts everyone aboard in danger.”


Illinois

Youth Deer Permits

Resident and non-resident Illinois Youth Firearm Deer permits are available over-the-counter (OTC) from DNR

Direct license and permit vendors, by phone at 888-673-7648 (1-888-6PERMIT), or online at www.dnr.illinois.gov through Aug. 31 (OTC only after Aug. 31).


Archery Deer and Fall Turkey hunting opportunities

Resident Archery Deer and Fall Turkey Permits

Resident combination archery deer permits, resident antlerless-only archery deer permits, and resident archery fall turkey hunting permits are available over-the-counter from DNR Direct license and permit vendors.  Find a vendor near you at this link: http://dnr.illinois.gov/DNRDirectMonitor/VendorListing.aspx

 

Non-Resident Archery Deer and Fall Turkey Permits

The remaining non-resident 2011 Illinois combination archery deer permits, non-resident antler­less-only archery deer permits, non-resident archery fall turkey permits are available over-the-counter (OTC) from DNR Direct license and permit ven­dors, by phone at 1-888-673-7648 (1-888-6PERMIT), or online at www.dnr.illinois.gov through Aug.

31 (OTC only after Aug. 31).

 

Upland Game Permits

Hunters may apply through Aug. 31 for the Illinois 2011 Free Upland Game Hunt Permit program.  Applications must be made online at www.dnr.illinois.gov/hunting/uplandgame

 

Public Duck and Goose Hunting Area Permits

Resident hunters may ap­ply online from Aug. 16-30 for the first lottery for the Illinois 2011 Public Duck and Goose Hunting Area Permit program.  The second lottery deadline is Sept. 13 for those unsuccessful resident applicants from the first lottery, residents who didn’t apply in the first lottery, and non-residents.  All initial applications must be made online at www.dnr.illinois.gov/duck or www.dnr.illinois.gov/goose


Coast Guard, DNR cops bust illegal charter boat operations

Personnel from the U.S. Coast Guard and the IDNR wrapped up a joint operation last week intended to deter illegal charter boat operations occurring in the downtown-Chicago area.

 

Coast Guardsmen and IDNR DNR cops teamed up in response to multiple reports by local licensed charter captains that recreational vessels appeared to be operating illegal charters in the Chicago area.

 

One of those reports prompted Coast Guard and IDNR personnel to investigate a vessel reportedly carrying passengers for hire on the Chicago River and Lake Michigan. Upon return from a trip, personnel from both agencies boarded the vessel. During the course of the boarding, it was determined 15 passengers paid the captain of the unlicensed and uninspected vessel for a three-hour tour on Lake Michigan.

 

As in most cases, the illegal charter had been arranged through an online buy-and-sell advertisement website. Coast Guard investigators issued the owner of the vessel a Notice of Violations with a total proposed penalty of $2,350. The maximum penalty the Coast Guard can issue depends on the specific violation and can range from $110 to $32,500. Since the captain of the vessel was not a U.S. Coast Guard licensed captain, conservation police issued separate citations for violations of state laws to both the captain and the owner of the vessel.

The operation of a charter vessel without the required vessel documents and operator license is a violation of federal law, and if caught, the captain could be subject to criminal or civil liability. The regulations are in place to help ensure the safety of passengers. Illegal charter boats are typically recreational vessels and are generally operated by a person without the required Coast Guard-issued captain’s license.  

 

Coast Guard-issued captain’s licenses demonstrate that the captain of a commercial vessel has met requirements in navigation and seamanship rules. The Coast Guard advises the public to ask the boat’s captain to show them his or her original Coast Guard license.  If the boat is carrying more than six passengers, it is required to be inspected by the Coast Guard, and the Certificate of Inspection should be displayed in an area accessible to passengers. The Certificate of Inspection shows a vessel has met the minimum Coast Guard safety; and sets the maximum number of passengers the vessel can carry.

 

If the public wants to verify a captain’s license or the inspected status of a vessel carrying more than six passengers, or to report an illegal charter operation, they can call Coast Guard Sector Lake Michigan 24/7 at 414-747-7182.   The joint operation was an extension of the partnership developed during this year’s Chicago Public Safety Campaign.

 

 


Indiana

DNR proposes waterfowl season dates

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources is proposing the same number of days as last year for waterfowl hunting season in all three zones – 60 days for ducks and 74 for Canada geese – but is recommending a change in how those days are distributed in the state's North Zone.

 

The North Zone will be split into two segments for hunting of ducks, coots and mergansers, and into three segments for Canada geese. In recent years, North Zone duck hunting dates ran consecutively and the Canada goose season was in two segments.  “If you go straight through for 60 days in the North Zone duck season, it would open on a Saturday and close on a Tuesday,” said Adam Phelps, waterfowl biologist for DNR Fish & Wildlife. “So, we moved the two extra days to later, basically to try to give a weekend to those folks who want to hunt late.”

 

The dates are not final until approved by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in mid to late September. Historically, dates have been accepted as proposed. The DNR’s recommended dates for ducks, coots and mergansers are:

• North Zone, Oct. 15 to Dec. 11, and Dec. 24-25

• South Zone, Oct. 22-30, and Nov. 23 to Jan. 12

• Ohio River Zone, Oct. 29-30, and Nov. 26 to Jan. 22

For Canada geese, the proposed dates are:

• North Zone, Oct. 15 to Nov. 6, Nov. 23 to Jan. 8, and Jan. 14-17

• South Zone, Oct. 22-30 and Nov 23 to Jan. 26

• Ohio River Zone, Oct. 29-30 and Nov. 21 to Jan. 31

 

The North Zone is that part of Indiana north of a line extending east from the Illinois border along Indiana 18 to U.S. 31; north along U.S. 31 to U.S. 24; east on U.S. 24 to Huntington; and southeast on U.S. 224 to the Ohio border.

 

The South Zone is the area south of that line but north of the Ohio River Zone.

The Ohio River Zone is that portion of Indiana south of a line extending east from the Illinois border along Interstate 64 to New Albany; east on Indiana 62 to Indiana 56; east on Indiana 56 to Vevay; along Indiana 156 to North Landing; north on Indiana 56 to U.S. 50; and northeast on U.S. 50 to the Ohio border.

The daily bag limit for ducks in all zones is six, including no more than four mallards (of which no more than two can be hens), three wood ducks, two pintails, two redheads, two scaup, one canvasback, one black duck, and one mottled duck. The possession limit is twice the daily bag limit.

 

The daily bag limit for Canada geese in all zones is two with a possession limit of four.

 

DNR also has proposed a 15-day late season for Canada geese from Feb. 1-15 in selected areas. Indiana conducted what was scheduled as a three-year experiment authorized by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to target resident giant Canada geese without negatively impacting migratory geese. Last season was the third year of the experiment, and although most areas achieved the USFWS requirement that at least 80 percent of the late season harvest consist of resident giant Canada geese, areas around Terre Haute reported only 78 percent.

“So now we’re in a holding pattern, but they are letting us continue to evaluate,” Phelps said.

 

Consequently, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will authorize the late season only in the same counties as previous years. Those counties are: Adams, Allen, Boone, Clay, DeKalb, Elkhart, Greene, Hamilton, Hancock, Hendricks, Huntington, Johnson, Kosciusko, LaGrange, LaPorte, Madison, Marion, Marshall, Morgan, Noble, Parke, St. Joseph, Shelby, Steuben, Starke, Sullivan, Vermillion, Vigo, Wells and Whitley.

 

Special restrictions apply; a free permit is required. The daily bag limit is five, and the possession limit is 10.  Statewide season dates for light geese and brant are Oct. 15 to Jan. 27. The bag limit is 20 light geese (snow and/or Ross' geese) and one brant. The possession limit is two brant. There is no possession limit on light geese.

 

Statewide season dates for white-fronted geese are Oct. 15 to Nov. 6 and Nov. 23 to Jan. 26. The daily bag limit is one, and the possession limit is two.  For more information: Phil Bloom, DNR Communications, (317) 232-4003, pbloom@dnr.in.gov.

 


DNR aims to clear up possession limit rules

The Department of Natural Resources has proposed rule changes to clear up ambiguity regarding possession limits for legally taken fish and wildlife that have a bag limit, without adversely affecting wildlife species or unnecessarily encumbering legal anglers and hunters.

 

“There are varied opinions and interpretations of the existing possession limit rule that cause confusion within the fishing and hunting public” said Col. Scotty Wilson, director of DNR Law Enforcement. “Therefore, we’re seeking a rule change to clearly define possession restrictions where a bag limit is established and at what point legally taken wild animals no longer count toward a possession limit.”

 

The Natural Resources Commission, an autonomous board that must approve rule changes requested by the DNR, granted preliminary adoption of the proposed change at its July 19 meeting. The measure is open for public comment on the NRC website (www.in.gov/nrc/2377.htm), which also includes full text of the proposed rule language. Public comments will be included in a report to the NRC prior to consideration of final adoption at a future date.

 

A nine-month review of current regulations by two DNR divisions – Law Enforcement and Fish & Wildlife – prompted the agency to seek the change, which would exempt from the possession limit restriction legally taken wild animals that have been processed and stored at an individual’s primary residence.

 

Several other state wildlife agencies that were contacted as part of the review already have adopted similar rules.

Currently, daily bag limit is defined (Indiana Code 14-8-2-18) as the quantity of individual wild animals that may be taken in one day of a specified season or during the entire season. For example, the daily bag limit for Northern pike

is three. The daily bag limit for rabbits is five.

Confusion begins with possession limit, which is intended to be twice the daily bag limit.

 

However, common questions asked of the DNR point to the challenge of a universally accepted definition:

• Does possession limit apply only in the field, while at camp, cabin, or hotel?

• Does it include fish and wildlife stored at my home in my freezer?

• Do last season’s rabbits still in my freezer count against this year?

• If I currently have two times the daily bag limit in my freezer, can I hunt/fish for that species again before using some of it?

• If not, what are the requirements for becoming legal? Do I have to eat it, give it away, or simply dispose of it to become “legal”?

• Does part of a wild animal, such as two hind legs of a rabbit, count as a full rabbit?

 

Current fishing regulations complicate the issue, depending on where fish are caught. Daily bag limits only apply to public waters. Fish taken from private ponds or impoundments may be taken in any quantity.

 

“This proposal will clarify language that seems to make criminals out of someone simply because he or she is an avid and successful hunter or angler,” Wilson said.

 

These changes would not apply to migratory birds and waterfowl. U.S. Fish and Wildlife authorities interpret possession limit to include processed and stored specimens. Wilson said, “at this time we feel it would be too problematic to have state and/or federal laws that contradict each other on these particular species.”

For more info: Lt. William Browne, DNR Law Enforcement, (765) 509-0207, wbrowne@dnr.in.gov.


Minnesota

eDNA tests suggest presence of Silver carp in St. Croix River

Water samples from the St. Croix River have tested positive for genetic material from silver carp, suggesting the invasive, leaping Asian species may be present in the river as far north as the dam at St. Croix Falls, according to the Minnesota DNR.

 

To date, no silver carp have been caught in the St. Croix River, either by anglers or commercial fishing operators. Only two bighead carp, a different Asian species, have been caught in the river – one in 1996 and another on April 18 of this year.   The discovery has prompted the DNR to take several actions.

 

“Our immediate goal is to mobilize as much effort as possible to confirm the presence of live silver carp in the St. Croix,” DNR Commissioner Tom Landwehr. “The results raise the profile and the level of urgency around the Asian carp issue not just for the DNR, but for all agencies, conservation groups, municipalities and river users who have a stake in the health of the St. Croix and the Mississippi.”

 

The DNR will soon contract with commercial fishing operators to begin using nets on the St. Croix to try to capture live silver carp in the same areas where eDNA tests were positive. DNR staff will also use nets and boats outfitted with electric shocking capabilities to search for fish. DNR operations could start next week; commercial netting operations are expected to start by the end of August.

 

DNR officials said they will proceed with development of a bubble or sonic barrier at the mouth of the St. Croix River at Prescott, WI, pending results of the additional carp sampling. Scientists believe such a barrier would not be a 100-percent deterrent to Asian carp, but if the populations are low, the barrier could help keep additional carp out of the river while other population control methods are developed.

 

The DNR is considering a variety of funding sources, including requesting assistance from the Minnesota

Legislature, for the barrier. A recent estimate put the barrier’s construction cost (for materials alone) at $7 million.

 

No eDNA Positives on Mississippi River; more testing to be done

All 100 samples tested negative for bighead and black carp

On June 28, a private contractor collected 50 samples from a 4.3-mile stretch of the St. Croix River. The sample area started at the St. Croix Falls Dam and went downstream to near the town of Franconia. The sample area was roughly 48 to 52 miles upstream of the river’s confluence with the Mississippi River at Prescott, Wis.

 

On June 29, the same contractor, Environmental DNA Solutions from Granger, Ind., took 50 samples from the Mississippi River in St. Paul. The samples were collected in a river stretch starting at Lock and Dam 1 (Ford Dam) and ending 3.6 miles downstream at Pike Island. The DNR received the test results on Aug. 4.

 

All 100 samples from the St. Croix and Mississippi rivers were tested for three species of Asian carp: black, bighead and silver. The three species could cause serious damage to Minnesota’s native fish and aquatic systems by filter-feeding vast amounts of plankton, a key foundation of a river’s ecosystem and food chain.

 

All 100 samples tested negative for bighead and black carp. All the samples tested negative for silver carp in the Mississippi River. Scientists cautioned that the negative results on the Mississippi River do not mean silver carp are not in the river. They said the Mississippi was at flood stage during the testing process, which could have limited the accumulation of carp DNA.

 

DNR staff note that bighead and silver carp have been caught in the Mississippi downstream of Lake Pepin. In contrast, the positive samples from the St. Croix River were more conclusive. Twenty-two of 50 samples (44 %) tested positive for silver carp along the 4.3-mile stretch of river.


New York

Saltwater anglers to get refunds

Cuomo directs DEC to issue refunds for Saltwater Fishing Licenses

Albany, NY -- Governor Andrew M. Cuomo, on August 5 directed the DEC to issue refunds to recreational fishermen and charter boat operators who purchased a Recreational Marine Fishing License (RMFL) in addition to refunding license fees to New Yorkers who purchased lifetime licenses. The federal government requires all fishermen in marine waters must be registered, and the state originally met this requirement by adopting the RMFL program. However, the 2011-2012 New York State budget eliminated the license fee, and created a no-fee registration program to comply with federal law. Therefore, any New Yorker who purchased a license for 2011 will be issued a refund.

 

Refunds totaling $1,350,000 have already been issued to approximately 9,000 saltwater anglers who purchased a "lifetime license" in 2010. Starting today the DEC will begin issuing refunds to approximately 200 charter boat operators totaling $80,000 dollars; and, approximately 23,000 individuals who purchased an annual license in 2011 will receive refunds totaling $220,000 dollars.

 

Jim Hutchinson Jr., Managing Director of the Recreational Fishing Alliance said, "Governor Cuomo has made it clear that his top priority is to stimulate New York's economy and protect our states natural resources at the same time. In directing the DEC to refund fishermen and businesses, the Governor is putting real money back into the pockets of New Yorkers. I applaud the Governor for creating the no-fee registry that will help create and sustain jobs throughout the fishing community in Long Island."

 

No-Fee Registry in Place

In compliance with amendments to the Environmental Conservation Law that eliminated recreational marine fishing license fees, Governor Cuomo directed the DEC to 

establish a no-fee registration system. All anglers 16 years of age and older who take fish from the waters of the marine district, or who take anadromous fish from any waters of the state, are required to register with NYSDEC through DECALS, the Department's automated sporting licenses system.

 

The requirement is identical to that of the previously instituted Recreational Marine Fishing License, but is now without charge. Those fishing from a for-hire party or charter fishing vessel that is licensed by DEC are not required to obtain an individual registration.

To register, anglers can go to the usual outlets for sporting licenses, or register online at: www.dec.ny.gov/permits/6101.html.  After registering, anglers will be given a card similar to the fishing license the registry replaced. Those registering online should print out their receipt. The registration card or receipt must be in possession when exercising the privileges of the registration.


The new registration fulfills a federal mandate to develop a database of New York marine recreational anglers in order to improve federal recreational fishing surveys about the number and size of their catch.

 

Anglers must register with New York even if they have already registered with the federal National Saltwater Angler Registry. DEC will be uploading the names and addresses of all lifetime, charter boat operators, and individuals who purchased an RMFL in 2011 into the free registry, therefore those license holders will not need to register this year, but are required to register in 2012.

 

For more information, visit www.dec.ny.gov/permits/54950.html  on the DEC website.

 

If you have not received a refund by September 15, please call: 631-444-0249 or 518-402-8044.


2011-2012 Sporting Licenses available now

Deer Management Permits, Hunting, Fishing, Trapping Licenses 

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) announced that 2011-2012 hunting, fishing, and trapping licenses and Deer Management Permits (DMPs) may be purchased beginning August 15.

 

Licenses and permits can be purchased at one of DEC’s 1,500 license sales outlets statewide. Sporting licenses can also be ordered by mail or by telephone and via the internet at www.dec.ny.gov. The 2011-2012 sporting licenses are valid beginning October 1, 2011, through September 30, 2012.

 

Due to unforeseen delays associated with production of the hunting and trapping and fishing regulations guide books, they may not be available at license sales outlets on August 15. Those purchasing a license and not receiving a guide can download a copy from the DEC website (http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/37136.html for the hunting/trapping guide and http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/7917.html for the fishing guide) or return to any license vendor at a later date and request the 2011-2012 guide(s) desired.

 

DEC Automated Licensing System

DEC’s Automated Licensing System (DECALS) is New York State’s program for issuing sporting licenses and tracking license sales and revenues. DECALS may also be used for donations to the Habitat Access Stamp Program, Venison Donation Coalition, Conservation Fund, and the Trail Maintenance Program. DEC continues to improve and enhance DECALS to better meet the needs of sportsmen and women. For questions regarding license purchases, please call DECALS Call Center at (1-866-933-2257). Hours of operation for the Call Center are 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through Saturday from August 15 to October 15, 2011. Regular weekday hours of 8 am to 5 pm will resume on October 17, 2011.

 

License buyers should have the following items ready when applying: complete name and address information, customer ID number if you have it, proof of residency information (driver's license number or non-driver's ID number to qualify for a resident license), and, if purchasing by phone or internet, credit card and card expiration date. Hunting license purchases require individuals to provide proof of hunting education certification or a copy of a previous license, or this information must already be contained in their DECALS file.

Sales of all sporting licenses are deposited into the Conservation Fund which is used for the management of New York’s fish and wildlife populations and for protection and management of wildlife habitat.

New Regulations for 2011-2012

Hunters and trappers should be aware of several new regulations in effect for 2011-2012:

Crossbows may now be used for hunting big game (deer and bear) during the early bear season, regular firearms seasons, the special January firearms season in Suffolk County, and all late muzzleloading seasons. See www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/68802.html for more information.

Recent legislation lowered the minimum age for youth hunters to purchase a Junior Bowhunting license for big game hunting from 14 to 12 years of age. See the Junior Hunter Mentoring Program for detailed information on youth hunting requirements.

 

Bear hunting is now open in new areas in eastern New York and bear hunting season dates in central and western New York have been modified to create a uniform season across the Southern Zone. See Deer and Bear Hunting Seasons for season dates and locations.

Woodcock season has been expanded to 45 days. See Woodcock Hunting Seasons for dates.

 

New legislation now allows use of rifles for big game hunting in Wyoming and Cortland counties and in the portion of Chautauqua County south of Route 20.

 

For more detail for each of these regulation changes: www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/37136.html.  

 

Anglers should be aware that although the majority of fishing regulations have not changed from 2010-2011, significant changes have been made to the regulations for use and transportation of baitfish. Transportation corridors through which uncertified baitfish can be transported in motor vehicles have been established for Lake Ontario, Lake Erie and adjoining waters, as well as the Hudson River see: http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/47282.html.

 

Deer Management Permits

DEC issues Deer Management Permits (DMPs), often called doe tags, to move the population closer toward objective levels in each Wildlife Management Unit (a map of WMU boundaries across the state can be found at http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/8302.html). The target DMP allocation for 2011 varies by unit depending on the management objective, but overall DEC intends to issue approximately 10% more DMPs than in 2010. In addition to the Adirondack and Tug Hill units where DMPs are not authorized, WMUs 3A, 4L, 4S, 4U, and 4Z will be closed for DMPs in 2011. Applicants are reminded that DMPs are only valid for antlerless deer in the WMU specified on the permit.

 

 


Ohio

Ohio State Parks Duck Blind Lotteries set for August 20

COLUMBUS, OH – More than 290 permits are available to hunters wishing to hunt ducks and geese from a blind at an Ohio State Park lake this waterfowl hunting season. A lottery drawing for the permits will be held at 17 state parks and two wildlife areas the morning of Saturday, August 20.

Interested applicants must appear in person at a participating state park office with proof of a 2011 Ohio hunting license, state wetlands stamp endorsement in the applicant’s name, and a signed 2011 or 2010 federal duck stamp. Applicants under the age of 18 are encouraged to have a parent or legal guardian present to sign the permit contract, and must provide the required license and stamps.   

 

Participating state parks include Portage Lakes and West Branch in northeast Ohio; East Harbor, Indian Lake and Lake Loramie in northwest Ohio; Adams Lake, Buck Creek, Caesar Creek, Cowan Lake, East Fork, Hueston Woods, and Rocky Fork in southwest Ohio; and Alum Creek, A.W. Marion, Buckeye Lake, Deer Creek, and Delaware in central Ohio.   

Applications will be taken beginning at 7:30 a.m. at most parks, with the lottery drawings at 8 a.m. at the park office, unless otherwise noted in the listing below.

 

Each hunter can apply for only one duck blind permit and 

no one can apply or draw for another person. There is a $50 non-refundable permit fee for the state park lottery winners.  Most locations accept cash, checks or credit cards for payment, except for Portage Lakes where payment is by cash (exact change) or check only.  Lottery winners have 45 days to construct their blinds and all blinds must be dismantled by March 15, 2012.

 

Hunters wishing to participate in the lotteries at Delaware or Indian Lake state parks are advised that the nearby Delaware marina, and the Indian Lake park office and commissary no longer sell hunting licenses and duck stamps. Hunters should purchase their license and stamp from another vendor prior to the lotteries. 

 

Waterfowl hunting opportunities are also available through lottery drawings for blinds at the Mercer Wildlife Area on Grand Lake St. Marys, and the Mosquito Creek Wildlife Area adjacent to Mosquito Lake State Park. The drawings will be held at the respective wildlife area offices on August 20. There is no fee for use of the blinds at these areas. Lottery participants must also have a current Harvest Information Program (HIP) certification.  

 

Information on waterfowl hunting seasons, locations and restrictions will be discussed by park staff and wildlife officers during the lotteries. For general information about hunting seasons and regulations, call 1-800-WILDLIFE or visit wildohio.com online.


Permits to participate in hunt will be awarded by lottery

COLUMBUS, OH – A lottery drawing will be held on September 17 for hunters wishing to participate in special deer gun hunts this fall at Lake Katherine State Nature Preserve in Jackson County, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources. 

 

Hunters must appear in person for the lottery drawing at Lake Katharine on Saturday September 17, which is a change in procedure for the annual hunts. Starting at 10 a.m., hunters may purchase tickets for the drawing, which will be held at 12 noon. The tickets are $5 each, and there is a limit of five tickets per person.  In addition to the ticket(s), lottery participants must also provide a photo ID and proof of a valid Ohio hunting license. 

 

Each lottery winner will receive a non-transferable hunting permit for themselves and a hunting partner of their choice. The hunting partners need not be present at the drawing. After the drawing, hunters will be given the opportunity to scout the area for which they were drawn, and advised of special regulations that apply during the hunts.

 

The special hunts for the lottery winners and their partners

will be held on November 28 and December 3.  A total of    

21 permits will be issued for each of the two days. The hunts have been designated as “doe first,” requiring that each hunter harvest an anterless deer before taking a buck. Ohio hunting regulations, including bag limits and tagging requirements, will be observed.

 

Lake Katharine State Nature Preserve offers more than 2,000 acres of rugged Appalachian forest featuring a spectacular clear water lake surrounded by towering cliffs. The preserve is home to several endangered species and significant wildflower populations. The high quality habitats found within the preserve have been negatively impacted by over-browsing deer. This impact has been the impetus for the hunts that have been occurring at this site for nearly 20 years. These hunts allow sportsmen to see this magnificent site and assist with management goals at the same time.

 

Lake Katharine State Nature Preserve is located off State Route 35, approximately four miles northwest of Jackson, at 1703 Lake Katharine Road, Jackson, Ohio, 45640. The lottery drawings will take place at the nature preserve office/maintenance garage

 


Wisconsin

New evidence of Asian carp in Lower Wisconsin River

MADISON - An angler's catch of a bighead carp in the Lower Wisconsin River and traces of silver carp DNA -- the carp known for its jumping behavior -- in the St. Croix River late last month have state officials calling on the federal government to direct funding and attention to aquatic invasive species in the Mississippi River system.

 

The two Asian carp species, which have been steadily moving upstream, are among a growing list of invasive species threatening Wisconsin waters of the Upper Mississippi River.

 

"High water levels on the Mississippi River are enabling more Asian carp to move farther into Wisconsin waters," says Bob Wakeman, who coordinates Department of Natural Resources efforts to prevent and control the spread of aquatic invasive species.  "Their presence is not a big surprise because their numbers have grown tremendously in the lower Mississippi and Illinois River systems and stray fish have reached Wisconsin before. But it's a big concern because of the potential damage they can do. "We need the federal government to recognize the importance of the Mississippi River basin's invasive species problem and give it the attention and funding it deserves."

 

Click on image for a larger PDF of the Asian carp distribution map

 

Wakeman says DNR also needs anglers and boaters for their help in keeping these fish from getting established in the Upper Mississippi, and in the Lower Wisconsin and St. Croix rivers, two of the most pristine rivers in the country.

 

Anglers and boaters can help by continuing to follow state rules to prevent the spread of invasive species continuing to follow rules to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species and the fish disease VHS, and by reporting when they catch a bighead or silver carp or the closely related grass carp and black carp, Wakeman says.

 

"Please take a photo of it, note where you caught it, put it on ice and bring it to a local DNR office," he says. "We need everybody's help to keep our fishing strong and our rivers healthy."

 

Bighead and silver carp eat plankton and can potentially decrease populations of native fish that rely on plankton for food, including all larval fishes, some adult fishes, and native mussels. Bighead carp can eat 20 percent of their own body weight in food each day, and can grow to 60 inches and 110 pounds. Silver carp also have been known to jump out of the water and injure boaters.

 

DNR is supporting Minnesota's efforts to use electrofishing

boats and nets to look for fish below the St. Croix Falls

dam, where the silver carp DNA was detected earlier this month. Bighead or silver carp have been captured in the Mississippi River along Wisconsin’s western border since 1996 and a bighead carp was captured at the mouth of the St. Croix River earlier this year.

 

The DNR also is partnering with the University of Notre Dame and others to collect water samples to test for Asian carp DNA from the Milwaukee, Kinnickinnic, Menomonee, Sheboygan, and Root rivers, and the Milwaukee, Sheboygan, Racine and Kenosha harbors. The Milwaukee, Kinnickinnic and Menomonee rivers were sampled last year and no DNA from Asian carp was detected. The Great Lakes and Mississippi River basins are artificially connected by the Chicago waterway system.

 

No signs of Asian carp reproducing in Wisconsin waters

The silver lining to the recent findings is that no young Asian carp or other signs of successful reproduction have been documented so far in any Wisconsin waters, says John Lyons, a longtime DNR fisheries researcher and fish identification expert. Also, dams on the Wisconsin River at Prairie du Sac and on the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway at St. Croix Falls will block the fish from travelling farther inland, and measures already in place can help slow the spread. [A fish passage planned for the Prairie du Sac dam has been designed to prevent invasive aquatic species and fish from getting further upstream.]

 

"The population densities are real low -- the bighead and silver carp entering the Upper Mississippi are mainly strays so there really isn’t a critical mass up here yet," Lyons says. "Will there ever be? And what is the critical mass? It's a big unknown."

 

Wisconsin has taken actions within its own borders to slow the spread of Asian carp and other invasive species, ranging from banning the sale, transport, possession and introduction of bighead, black, grass and silver carp, to enacting ballast water treatment standards, to banning harvest of bait fish from the Mississippi River and its tributaries. That's important because young Asian carp resemble gizzard shad and many minnows, and the DNR doesn’t want Asian carp to mistakenly be harvested and taken to another water system for use as bait, according to Ron Benjamin, longtime DNR fisheries supervisor on the Upper Mississippi River.

 

Wisconsin also is supporting research to find ways of eradicating aquatic invasive species or at least limiting their ability to spread to other waters, and DNR has worked with other states and federal agencies along the river to develop action plans to slow the spread of carp and other invasive species.

 

Federal attention and funding, however, has shifted to the Great Lakes region in recent years as concerns grew that Asian carp from the Mississippi River system might invade the Great Lakes, Benjamin says.

 

While the Asian carp can be blocked from reaching the Great Lakes by severing the connection between the two basins, options on the Mississippi River are more limited, the DNR officials say. The dams on the Upper Mississippi River itself are not high enough to be complete barriers to the Asian carp moving upstream, and the chance of closing down the locks, a decision that would need to be authorized by the U.S. Congress, is very small, Lyons says.

 

Benjamin hopes the recent findings will help bring federal attention back to the Mississippi River, noting that Asian carp were brought to the United States by the aquaculture industry in cooperation with federal agencies. "I hope that the recent finding will refocus some attention and funding the Mississippi to help implement a multi-state plan to prevent the introduction of new aquatic invasive species within the basin, and to prevent those already here from expanding into unconnected ecosystems," he says. "Finally, one of our best defenses is to keep our ecosystems healthy and diverse."


2011 Wisconsin waterfowl hunting seasons set

MADISON – The Natural Resources Board set 2011 waterfowl season dates and bag limits and approved creation of a third waterfowl hunting zone at its meeting today in Spring Green.

 

“Waterfowl hunters can look forward to a full 60-day duck season with a six-duck daily bag, and an 85-day exterior goose zone season,” said Kent Van Horn, Department of Natural Resources waterfowl ecologist. “It was a good year for duck production in Wisconsin and across the continent. Overall conditions were very good for breeding ducks. The continental breeding duck estimates hit a record level at 45.6 million ducks making 2011 good year to be a duck hunter.

 

“As always, the most successful hunters will be the ones doing the early season scouting, locating the smaller isolated potholes that can attract waterfowl when hunting pressure is high in other areas and securing permissions from landowners well in advance,” added Van Horn. “I’d like to thank the thousands of hunters who participated in the

 

development of our new duck hunting zones and wish all waterfowl hunters a successful and safe season.”

 

2011 waterfowl season structure

During the 60-day season duck season, the daily bag limit is six ducks in total. The six-duck total may include no more than four mallards, of which only one can be a hen, three wood ducks, two redheads, one black duck, two pintail, two scaup and one canvasback; in addition, five mergansers to include not more than two hooded mergansers. Coot daily bag of 15. (For duck species not listed such as teal and ring-necked ducks, the combined total with all other species may not exceed six ducks).

  • Northern Zone-Sept. 24 at 9 a.m.-Nov. 22.

  • Southern Zone-Oct. 1 at 9 a.m.-Oct. 9, and Oct. 15 –Dec. 4.

  • Mississippi River Zone-Sept. 24 at 9 a.m. – Oct. 2, Oct. 15-Dec. 4 (12 day split Oct 3-14)

 

For more information: http://dnr.wi.gov/news/BreakingNews_Lookup.asp?id=2165


Youth Waterfowl Hunt

The youth waterfowl hunt will be Sept. 17-18. Youth may harvest Canada geese in all zones during these 2 days. All bag limits and tag requirements apply for the zone hunted. These days overlap with open goose seasons in most areas so adults will also be able to harvest geese but not ducks during the youth hunt.

 

 “The youth waterfowl hunt is important to the future of

waterfowl hunting and I encourage all waterfowl hunters to take a son, daughter, niece, nephew or family friend out for this weekend,” said Van Horn. “It’s a great time to share your experience with a new or prospective waterfowler, outside of the regular duck seasons, when there are fewer hunters competing for spots and when warmer weather can be anticipated.”

 


Other Breaking News Items

(Click on title or URL to read full article)

 

Asian Carp found in lower Wisconsin River

Even as the feds are spending $20,000 a day to operate and maintain an electric barrier on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal in a desperate attempt to keep Asian carp from colonizing the Great Lakes, these critter  are finding other ways to continue their inexorable migration north - not into Lake Michigan, but into Wisconsin's inland waters.


Asian carp could invade by truck
While wary eyes focus on a waterway in Chicago for the Asian carp's invasion of the Great Lakes, Ontario thinks the unwanted intruder will arrive by bridge. In trucks.

 

New evidence of Asian carp in Wisconsin waters
An angler's catch of a bighead carp in the Lower Wisconsin River and traces of silver carp DNA in the St. Croix River last month have state officials calling on the federal government to direct funding and attention to aquatic invasive species in the Mississippi River system.

 

Negative image aside, Asian carp are a boon
For many people, Asian carp are proving more boon than bane. Bolstered by government support, the Asian carp harvest has leapt thirtyfold in the past decade.

 

MI DNR: End most salmon planting in Lake Huron
State fishery biologists have recommended eliminating Chinook salmon stocking in most parts of Lake Huron next year.

 

Asian carp FAQ
Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Asian carp, an invasive species of fish that is traveling north on the Mississippi River and threatening to enter the Great Lakes.

Big Head Carp found in Iowa Great Lakes
Experts think flooding on the Missouri River and the Little Sioux River may have helped it get there.

 

Asian carp: perhaps not so threatening to the Great Lakes after all?
Surprisingly, as Tina Lam talked with more and more stakeholders in areas infested with Asian carp, she discovered the fish wasn't having quite the dramatic impact on ecosystems that many fear if Asian carp ever reached the Great Lakes.

 

EDITORIAL: Keep funding control measures, or watch sea lamprey multiply
Sea lamprey might be loving all the attention paid to Asian carp -- if their real love wasn't just sucking the juices out of fish in the Great Lakes. But Michigan can ill afford to let the spotlight on potential invasions divert its attention from a notoriously destructive one that has been here for ages.

 

Sportsman says he's found Asian Carp in Lake Erie
A man kayaking out on Lake Erie spotted what he thinks was an Asian Carp jumping near his boat.

 

Quinn signs bill to study offshore wind energy
Gov. Pat Quinn has signed bills creating a council to study the potential for wind energy projects in Lake Michigan and allowing counties to establish wind farm districts.

 

Snakeheads can move on land, eat other fish -- and could be another threat to Great Lakes
If you think Asian carp might wreak havoc on the Great Lakes, meet the northern snakehead fish. Along with Asian carp, the torpedo-shaped fish is considered one of 10 invasive species at high risk of invading the Great Lakes from the Mississippi River Basin.

More problems for Great Lakes
The discovery of pharmaceutical byproducts in Lake Michigan, and more recently Lake Erie, is raising concerns about the potential health risk to the more than 40 million who rely on the Great Lakes for drinking water – as well as concerns about what else might be circulating in the water.

Asian carp: DNA evidence finds something fishy near Lake Michigan
The failure of a recent expedition to find any invasive Asian carp near Lake Michigan – though DNA traces say they are there – has shipping interests claiming victory and others calling foul.

 

 

The opinions expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the GLSFC, its officers or staff. 

Reproduction of any material by paid-up members of the GLSFC is encouraged but appropriate credit must be given. 

Reproduction by others without written permission is prohibited.

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