Week of September 6 , 2004

Fishing beyond the Great Lakes

National

Regional

General

Illinois

Indiana

Michigan

Minnesota

Ohio

Pennsylvania

Ontario

       Weekly News Archives

                         or

       New Product  Archives

 

Fishing beyond the Great Lakes

BUCKS AND SPURS GUEST RANCH 

Come to fish or hunt, stay and play

Welcome to the Bucks and Spurs Guest Ranch, a leisure one hour trip southeast of Missouri’s Bass Pro Shop capital – Springfield, a drive that will transform you from 21st century paved roads to 19th century gravel and dirt rural ribbons of anticipation and quiet verdant country pastures.

 

Come explore the many opportunities this ranch offers to experience; a land that remains much the same as when

 our forefathers hunted and skirmished on the glens and ravines of this Ozark region during and before the Civil War. Saddle up and ride back in time! This secluded 1000 acre ranch offers you a taste of the wide open spaces, a section of the Ozarks that are a pocket wilderness in the Midwest, that has clear mountain streams and beautiful timber, some great smallmouth bass and pan fish fishing, spring and fall turkey and deer hunting and a laid-back real ranch atmosphere.

 

Experience the cowboy’s life in the wide open spaces of a beautiful, secluded cattle and horse ranch, adjacent to the vast wilderness of the Mark Twain National Forest. Open all year, Bucks and Spurs Guest Ranch offers guided hunting trips for turkey and whitetail deer. Guided fishing trips to area lakes are also available.

 

Buck and Spurs is a haven nestled in the Ozark wilderness that also provides family vacations, corporate retreats and single vacations as well as campouts.  They also have horse camps for youngsters  and even horse training clinics. All meals are included as well as an after dinner campfire with marshmallows.

 

Whatever your dream of rural America, its real here in this quiet setting of a beautiful Ozark Mountain meadow that is graced with two gentle crystal clear streams coursing through this family owned ranch.  Big Beaver Creek, set in secluded Ozark surroundings of meandering curves, pools and bluffs, offers the smallmouth angler some exciting hours of fishing. Picnicking in the shades of large oaks and sycamores offer a fleeting repast and reflection rarely realized in our hectic lifestyles. This same stream is one of the paths trail riders follow as they spend the day re-discovering Missouri’s past.   You can leave it all behind here.

 

The region cradling the Big Beaver Creek has been cultivated by working ranchers for generations. As times changed, the simple log homes and rustic barns gave way to guest ranches for the "dudes" who came up from the cities. Fresh air, unspoiled natural surroundings, and the feeling that time is suspended were in demand then and still in ample supply now.

 

Start your day with a horseback ride surrounded by the wonder of the nature and an opportunity to catch a glimpse of some of Missouri’s abundant wildlife. Raw nature provides the beautiful Ozark Mountain scenery along Big Beaver Creek. Have a cowboy breakfast on the trail or a ranch style breakfast in the lodge dining room, and afterwards riders can participate in horse and cattle drives or trail ride through the undisturbed pastures, glens and un-chartered river trails.

 

 Mid-day finds most guests at the creek for picnics  and cowboy cook-outs, a BBQ, or saddlebag lunch.  Take along a pack rod

and you can get a flavor of the bass fishing the quiet Big Beaver offers. Canoeing also offers a chance to let your cares drift away, or cool off with a swim. Young and the young at heart alike will all fit right in exploring the woods, hiking the bluffs along the creek, or hunting for arrowheads.

 

The two lodges on the ranch are in a wilderness with no neighbors within miles. Both lodges have central heat and air conditioning for your comfort.  One, an Aromatic cedar lodge with 3 full baths and private rooms is set at the edge of the woods. It includes an840 sq. ft wrap around covered deck also out of cedar with log stairways and railings. The second, a 2,400 sq ft lodge with 4 private bedroom and 3 baths has all the usual comforts with the main kitchen, leisure room with fireplace and the dining area. A laundry facility is on site. The lodges offer beautiful views of the wilderness setting, scenery that you can see for miles.

 

The riding is fun but Bucks and Spurs isn’t just a place to enjoy horses. People tired of hustle and bustle will find time slows to a peaceful pace in this rural setting. There’s never a rush to get anywhere and always time to look for Indian and civil war artifacts, signs of wildlife on the trail or swim and fish in the creek with a gorgeous bluff and clear blue skies serving as a backdrop.

 

Owners Cecil “C” and Sonny Huff are gracious hosts who enjoy sharing their love of horses and quiet lifestyle with folks like you and me, experienced cowpokes and everyone in between, but especially for those of us who want to escape the hectic pace of big city life.

 

When you feel a need to leave the haven of Bucks and Spurs, Missouri’s third-largest city – Springfield – is nearby with shopping, fine dining, performing arts and museums. Attractions include Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World, wonders of Wildlife Zooquarium, Dickerson Park Zoo, Discovery Center, Fantastic Caverns, the Missouri Sports Hall of Fame, the Springfield-Conservation Nature Center and much more.  The Laura Ingalls Wilder home is on the way to the ranch and Branson is only 45 miles away, in the other direction.

 

For more information, contact the Springfield Convention and Visitors Bureau at 800-678-8767,  Bucks and Spurs at 417-683-2381 or visit www.bucksandspurs.com More contact info is below.

 

Contact Info

 

Bucks and Spurs Guest Ranch

Cecil and Sonny Huff, General managers

Rt. 4, Box 740, Ava, MO 65608
417-683-2381 Ph

417-683-5464 Fax

417-250-1100 cell

csonny@getgoin.net
http://www.bucksandspurs.com/

 

Springfield Convention & Visitors Bureau

3315 E Battlefield Rd

Springfield, MO  65804

800-678-8767

www.SpringfieldAdventures.com

cvb@springfieldmo.org

 

Bass Pro Shops

2500 E. Kearney,

Springfield, MO 65898

www.basspro.com

800-227-7776 (800-BASSPRO )

 


National

Help Protect the Great Lakes - Your help is needed

We need your financial help to fund the operations of the Illinois Waterway electronic barrier – to prevent Asian carp and other nasty critters from entering our lakes

 

A second larger, longer-life barrier is now under construction, but the cost of the design exceeds available funds by $1.8 million.

 

Illinois has contributed $2 million to the project, but the other Great Lakes Governors say they are not able to contribute the balance – $1.8 million. Their states do not have the money. The need for the additional $1.8 million is critical.

 

Contributions from any non-federal source will help. That’s where clubs, individuals and corporate America can help

 

Use of Contributed Funds

Funds will be held by the Great Lakes Sport Fishing Council and distributed based on the direction of a board of non-

agency trustees including the president of the GLSFC.

 

All contributions are tax deductible and will only be used to:

 

1)     Implement the Asian Carp Rapid Response Plan

2)     Improve or operate Barrier I

3)     Construct and operate Barrier II

 

Send your donations to:

GLSFC – carp fund

P.O. Box 297

Elmhurst, IL  60126

 

Or use our PayPal for credit card donations. 

Go to www.great-lakes.org/carp

 

For more information and photos go to: 

www.great-lakes.org/carp

 

Thanks for your help in preventing the invasion

of these harmful critters into our lakes.


Asian Carp Prevention Fund

Asian Carp and other invasive species are approaching the Great Lakes via the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal. You may have seen video clips of these jumping fish on TV. Though humorous to watch, these large plankton-eating fish have the potential to wreak havoc on the Great Lakes ecology and commercial and recreational fisheries. Although it is unlikely they would be come abundant in the middle of the lake, they almost certainly would do well in near shore areas, river mouths and shallow productive bays. Not only would this add an undesirable component to the ecosystem but these fish add an element of personal risk to boaters and others using recreational watercraft. We must do whatever we can to keep these fish out of the Great Lakes.

 

The electric fish barrier in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal stops the passage of large fish. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers built this as a temporary project with only a three-year life span. The electrodes in this barrier are expected to wear out in about April 2005. Asian carp have been captured only 22 miles downstream of the barrier. We have a monitoring plan in place to determine the leading edge of the Asian carp population as they move closer to the barrier site and are working on a rapid response plan to kill the fish if they begin to accumulate in number below the barrier.

 

A second larger, more powerful barrier has been designed and construction will begin in July 2004. However, the cost of the barrier design to stop Asian carp from entering the lake exceeds the available funds by $1.8 million. We need funding to help support construction of the barrier and to help pay for the rapid response plan if it has to be used.

 

We Need Your Help to Protect the Great Lakes

The Second Barrier

A second larger, longer-life barrier is planned for construction in July 2004. The cost of the proposed design, which has been recommended by the Dispersal Barrier Advisory Panel, exceeds the available funds by $1.8 million. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers program under which the project is being constructed limits the federal contribution to the project to $5 million.

 

The State of Illinois has already contributed $2 million to the project and it will be difficult to obtain the entire balance from a single entity. Governors of most of the other Great Lakes do not feel they are able to contribute the balance of the funds at this time, yet the timing of these additional contributions is critical. If the funds can not be secured the cost of construction will increase by 30% or more and we will not have the two-barrier system needed to prevent small Asian carp from entering the Great Lakes until the second barrier is complete.

 

We are applying to other sources for the needed funds, but every contribution from any non-federal source will help.

Asian Carp Rapid Response

A Rapid response Committee has developed a Rapid Response Plan to address the presence of Asian carp in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal if they begin to congregate below the existing barrier before the second barrier is constructed.

 

The Asian Carp Rapid Response Plan would involve eliminating Asian carp from 5.5 miles of the Sanitary and Ship Canal. Current estimates for implementation of the plan place the cost at about $450,000. There are 18 agencies involved in the response planning effort but none of them has the funds to enact the plan if it is needed. Funding for the plan is not covered in any Congressional Act or other agency mission. The response plan is a vital action which must be used if the carp appear in the Canal before Barrier II is in place.

 

We need your financial support to help keep Asian carp out of the Great Lakes. The most immediate need is to gather enough money to make the rapid response happen if it is needed. The large-scale response if needed would most likely occur this summer or fall. Once Barrier II is online the response would be scaled back to treat the 1000 foot distance between the barriers if fish were found between the barriers.

 

The second use for the funds would be to maintain and improve Barrier I. Barrier I will still be needed after Barrier II is built. We need your help to ask Congress to extend that authorization indefinitely and to provide the Corps with the directive to construct improvements to Barrier I. These improvements would increase the effectiveness of Barrier I and the service life of the project. Right now, the Corps of Engineers does not have the authority to operate Barrier I after September 2004.

 

Use of Contributed Funds

The collected funds will be held by the Great Lakes Sportfishing Council and will be distributed based on the direction of a board of non-agency trustees including the executive director of the Great Lakes Sportfishing Council. All contributions are tax deductible and 100 percent of the contributions will be used towards Asian carp prevention. Contributions will be used to:

 

1)     1)Implement the Asian Carp Rapid Response Plan

2)     2)Construct Barrier II

3)     3)Improve or operate Barrier I

 

The funds will not be used for agency labor or overhead and will not be used for research. Collected donations will be used to pay for barrier construction, carp control chemicals or if absolutely necessary, for operating expenses of the barrier.

 

 


National Casting Tournaments

Chicago's All American Accuracy Tournament,  Sept. 25 - 26

Not the usual boat fishing tournaments we are accustomed to but not new either, the Chicago Angling & Casting Club continues to resurrect the century old recreation of casting accuracy/distance tournaments.  This one is the Chicago's All American Accuracy Tournament  Sept. 25 & 26.

 

 Saturday, Sept 25 

Accuracy - These events will take place in Chicago on Saturday, the 25th at Lincoln Park's North Pond on the West side

                           of the Peggy Notebaert Nature museum. (At Fullerton & Stockton)  Starting Time - 8:30 am

 

Distance - These events will be cast in Valparaiso, IN. at Valparaiso U. next to the Baseball & Soccer fields just North of  U.S. 30 in back of the Speedway gas station and Bob Evans.    Starting Time - 9 am

 

Accuracy Events Schedule:  Trout Fly            

                                              Bass Bug

                                              1/4 oz. Plug           

                                              5/8 oz. Plug

 

No dry fly or 3/8 oz. unless time permits

 

 Possible 5-person team event

 

Special All American 5/8  oz. Plug Event (No  Fee)

Casters that have participated in any event at an "Outdoor" national tournament are eligible to compete for the coveted All American award.   There will be an All American award for the top adult and the top non-adult.

 

Distance Events:   2-Hand 5/8 oz. Spinning

                              2-Hand 5/8 oz. Revolving Spool

                              1/4 oz. Single Hand Spinning

                              Single Hand Fly Distance

                              2-Hand Fly Distance

                              Anglers Fly Distance 

 

Accuracy Divisions: Men, Srs. & Women (minimum 3)

                                  Int. (13 to 16), Jrs. (9 to 12), Youth (8 & under) (No minimum for non-adults) 

Sunday, Sept 26

The Sunday events will be the 6 distance events including:

            2-hand spinning - 5/8oz.

            2-hand baitcast (revolving spool) - 5/8oz.

            1-hand spinning - 1/4oz.

            1-hand fly

            2-hand fly

            Angler's fly

 

Awards: Plaques or engraved glass awards.

Adults: First Place in all events with three or more contestants.

 

Non-Adults: First and Second Place plaques or glass awards ( no minimum requirements)

Combined Awards: All Fly Accy - All plug Accy - All Accy - All Fly Dist - All plug Dist - All Dist Grand All Around  

 

Fees: Adults - $5.00 per event or $40.00 for all 10 events

           Non-Adults - $3.00 per event ($10.00 for all 4 Accy)

 

Hotels / Motesl: Valparaiso, IN

♦Fairfield Inn - 219-465-6225 (2101 US 30 / Northland Dr.)

♦Hampton Inn - 219-531-6424 (1451 Silhavy Rd. and US 30)

♦Super 8 - 219-464-9840 (3005 John Howell Dr. & US 30)

♦Hilton Garden Inn 219-983-9500 501 Gateway / Hwy 49 Chesterton, IN.

 

Hotels / Motels: Chicago 

♦Days Inn - 312-664-3040,  1816 N. Clark St. (parking $15)

♦Days Inn - 773-525-7010  646 W. Diversey (parking $15)

♦Lincoln Park Inn / formerly the Comfort Inn - 773-348-2810 - 601 W. Diversey Pkwy (parking $10)

♦The Belden - 312-787-6666 or 800-800-8301, 2300 Lincoln  Park W, (parking $10)

 

Contact the organizers know if you will be attending both the accuracy & the distance events, or just the accuracy events on  Saturday.

 

Hope to see you there and  Good Luck.

The Chicago Angling & Casting Club

John Seroczynski - Tournament Chairman

 

Phil Seroczynski - 847-358-4152

Ray Huber - 574-286-3350 or 574-935-5501 


Feds open more land to hunting and fishing

An additional 243,500 acres immediately opened

WASHINGTON — The Bush administration on August 31, said it will give people who hunt and fish new access to hundreds of thousands of acres of lands and streams within 17 national wildlife refuges and wetlands.

 

The decision on August 31, immediately opened an additional 243,500 acres, wildlife officials said.

 

The decision was announced by USFWS Director Steve Williams who said, "This is just another example of the president's commitment to sportsmen.  By law, Congress directed the service to consider and provide opportunities for hunting and fishing where it's compatible on the refuges. We take that quite seriously,"

 

Hunting and fishing have long been allowed in the 95-million-acre refuge system, which includes 544 national wildlife refuges and thousands of small wetlands and other specially managed areas. Currently, more than 300 wildlife refuges and

about 3,000 small wetlands are open to hunting, and more than 260 wildlife refuges are open to fishing.

 

Federal officials opened four more national wildlife refuges to hunting and fishing: Mountain Long Leaf in Alabama, 3,300 acres; Cypress Creek in Illinois, 100 acres; Red River in Louisiana, 2,700 acres; and Waccamaw in South Carolina, 10,500 acres.

 

Also opened were six more wetlands management districts: Devils Lake in North Dakota, 56,000 acres; and in South Dakota: Huron, 11,000 acres; Lake Andrews, 20,000 acres; Madison, 38,500 acres; Sand Lake, 45,000 acres; and Waubay, 4,400 acres.

 

Seven refuges where officials added to the land and marshes available for hunting are Savannah in Georgia and South Carolina, 2,000 acres; Big Oaks in Indiana, 10,000 acres; Big Branch Marsh in Louisiana, 6,000 acres; Crescent Lake in Nebraska, 5,000 acres; Cross Creek and Tennessee in Tennessee, 24,000 acres; and Trinity in Texas, 5,000 acres.


Tide Begins To Turn Following Mandatory Life Jacket Debate

Public, manufacturers, dealers all oppose government mandate

A major national debate on whether recreational boaters should be required to wear a life jacket while underway in a boat ended last week with little support for the proposal. During a public forum conducted by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), nearly every sector of the recreational boating community - from the boating consumer to the boat builder to the boat dealer to life jacket manufacturers - expressed strong opposition to a governmental mandate or failed to embrace the idea.

 

Speaking before a crowded auditorium filled with boating safety experts, federal and state officials and interest group representatives, BoatU.S. President Jim Ellis urged boaters to wear their life jackets when necessary, but argued that a new generation of inexpensive personal flotation devices that boaters would actually wear rather than stow in a locker on board a boat, as is now the case, is what is needed to reduce the number of drownings.

Of the approximately 700 boating fatalities each year, about 400 of these are drownings in which the victim was not wearing a life jacket. It is estimated that as many as 75 million Americans go boating at least once each year and that the cost to the boating public of having to purchase a life jacket that they would actually wear could exceed $1 billion.

 

"Forcing all boaters to wear an uncomfortable life jacket on a hot day when there is no perceived risk has little support among the boating public," said Ellis, in releasing the results of a survey conducted last month by the Recreational Marine Research Center of Michigan State University at the request of BoatU.S. According to the survey of nearly 10,000 boaters, 86% of those responding opposed a mandatory life jacket requirement.

 

"A broad-brush, one-size -fits-all approach will not solve this problem," said Ellis who urged the NTSB and the Coast Guard to conduct more thorough research on the causes of boating fatalities before issuing more regulations.

 


National Park Service financed Ohio Winery 

Half Million Dollar Investment in Private Vineyard Yet to Pay Off

Washington, DC — The cash-strapped National Park Service is subsidizing a private vineyard and winery on the grounds of the Cuyahoga Valley National Park in Ohio, according to agency documents released today by Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER). Since 1999, the Park Service has spent more than $475,000 on the vineyard – which has yet to bear fruit either literally or financially – and related operations that the Park Service calls its “Countryside Initiative.”

 

In the security arena, threats, harassment and attacks against National Park Service rangers and U.S. Park Police officers reached a record high in 2003, according to agency records released by Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER). At the same time, an already chronically understaffed NPS law enforcement is increasingly unable to protect visitors, national icons and wildlife, according to representatives of both rangers and U.S. Park Police officers.

 

Many feel the money could be better spent on protecting the regions ecosystem and aquatic resources.  The Chicago

Waterway Barrier is still in need of $1.8 million to complete the second barrier and fund the operation of the project for the first year.

 

The privately run winery on Park Service land consists of structures built with taxpayers’ funds, including an art gallery, parking lot, barn, trellises and an electric fence for “wildlife exclusion.” In addition, the Park Service spent more than $24,000 for a water line to bring municipal water to irrigate the grapes.

 

Meanwhile, “The Park Service has failed to provide law enforcement personnel to prevent further violence; despite its own projections that an additional 700 rangers are required, the number of rangers is down 9%”, says Randall Kendrick, Executive Director for the U.S. Park Rangers Lodge of the Fraternal Order of Police.

 

The vineyard covers 2.5 acres and is planted with grape varieties including Cabernet Franc, Baco Noir, Chambourcin, and Tramonette. The private operators project producing 10,000 cases of wine per year and expect their first harvest in 2005. The winery has already begun making experimental batches of wine and holding public tastings in the park.


Regional

Help Protect the Great Lakes - Your help is needed

We need your financial help to fund the operations of the Illinois Waterway electronic barrier – to prevent Asian carp and other nasty critters from entering our lakes

 

A second larger, longer-life barrier is now under construction, but the cost of the design exceeds available funds by $1.8 million.

 

Illinois has contributed $2 million to the project, but the other Great Lakes Governors say they are not able to contribute the balance – $1.8 million. Their states do not have the money. The need for the additional $1.8 million is critical.

 

Contributions from any non-federal source will help. That’s where clubs, individuals and corporate America can help

 

Use of Contributed Funds

Funds will be held by the Great Lakes Sport Fishing Council and distributed based on the direction of a board of non-

agency trustees including the president of the GLSFC.

 

All contributions are tax deductible and will only be used to:

 

1)     Implement the Asian Carp Rapid Response Plan

2)     Improve or operate Barrier I

3)     Construct and operate Barrier II

 

Send your donations to:

GLSFC – carp fund

P.O. Box 297

Elmhurst, IL  60126

 

Or use our PayPal for credit card donations. 

Go to www.great-lakes.org/carp

 

For more information and photos go to: 

www.great-lakes.org/carp

 

Thanks for your help in preventing the invasion

of these harmful critters into our lakes.


Asian Carp Prevention Fund

Asian Carp and other invasive species are approaching the Great Lakes via the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal. You may have seen video clips of these jumping fish on TV. Though humorous to watch, these large plankton-eating fish have the potential to wreak havoc on the Great Lakes ecology and commercial and recreational fisheries. Although it is unlikely they would be come abundant in the middle of the lake, they almost certainly would do well in near shore areas, river mouths and shallow productive bays. Not only would this add an undesirable component to the ecosystem but these fish add an element of personal risk to boaters and others using recreational watercraft. We must do whatever we can to keep these fish out of the Great Lakes.

 

The electric fish barrier in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal stops the passage of large fish. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers built this as a temporary project with only a three-year life span. The electrodes in this barrier are expected to wear out in about April 2005. Asian carp have been captured only 22 miles downstream of the barrier. We have a monitoring plan in place to determine the leading edge of the Asian carp population as they move closer to the barrier site and are working on a rapid response plan to kill the fish if they begin to accumulate in number below the barrier.

 

A second larger, more powerful barrier has been designed and construction will begin in July 2004. However, the cost of the barrier design to stop Asian carp from entering the lake exceeds the available funds by $1.8 million. We need funding to help support construction of the barrier and to help pay for the rapid response plan if it has to be used.

 

We Need Your Help to Protect the Great Lakes

The Second Barrier

A second larger, longer-life barrier is planned for construction in July 2004. The cost of the proposed design, which has been recommended by the Dispersal Barrier Advisory Panel, exceeds the available funds by $1.8 million. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers program under which the project is being constructed limits the federal contribution to the project to $5 million.

 

The State of Illinois has already contributed $2 million to the project and it will be difficult to obtain the entire balance from a single entity. Governors of most of the other Great Lakes do not feel they are able to contribute the balance of the funds at this time, yet the timing of these additional contributions is critical. If the funds can not be secured the cost of construction will increase by 30% or more and we will not have the two-barrier system needed to prevent small Asian carp from entering the Great Lakes until the second barrier is complete.

 

We are applying to other sources for the needed funds, but every contribution from any non-federal source will help.

Asian Carp Rapid Response

A Rapid response Committee has developed a Rapid Response Plan to address the presence of Asian carp in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal if they begin to congregate below the existing barrier before the second barrier is constructed.

 

The Asian Carp Rapid Response Plan would involve eliminating Asian carp from 5.5 miles of the Sanitary and Ship Canal. Current estimates for implementation of the plan place the cost at about $450,000. There are 18 agencies involved in the response planning effort but none of them has the funds to enact the plan if it is needed. Funding for the plan is not covered in any Congressional Act or other agency mission. The response plan is a vital action which must be used if the carp appear in the Canal before Barrier II is in place.

 

We need your financial support to help keep Asian carp out of the Great Lakes. The most immediate need is to gather enough money to make the rapid response happen if it is needed. The large-scale response if needed would most likely occur this summer or fall. Once Barrier II is online the response would be scaled back to treat the 1000 foot distance between the barriers if fish were found between the barriers.

 

The second use for the funds would be to maintain and improve Barrier I. Barrier I will still be needed after Barrier II is built. We need your help to ask Congress to extend that authorization indefinitely and to provide the Corps with the directive to construct improvements to Barrier I. These improvements would increase the effectiveness of Barrier I and the service life of the project. Right now, the Corps of Engineers does not have the authority to operate Barrier I after September 2004.

 

Use of Contributed Funds

The collected funds will be held by the Great Lakes Sportfishing Council and will be distributed based on the direction of a board of non-agency trustees including the executive director of the Great Lakes Sportfishing Council. All contributions are tax deductible and 100 percent of the contributions will be used towards Asian carp prevention. Contributions will be used to:

 

1)     1)Implement the Asian Carp Rapid Response Plan

2)     2)Construct Barrier II

3)     3)Improve or operate Barrier I

 

The funds will not be used for agency labor or overhead and will not be used for research. Collected donations will be used to pay for barrier construction, carp control chemicals or if absolutely necessary, for operating expenses of the barrier.

 

 


Cormorant Control update

New York

St. Lawrence River:

From the Lake Ontario Fisheries Coalition report:

There are four privately owned islands on the St. Lawrence River where cormorants nest.  Three of them had nests removed this year.

Bogartus Island all nests had been removed, but the number was unknown.

West Crossover Island - 20 nests were counted and they were removed by the landowner by June 12

Blanket Island - Had 200 nests with an additional 200 nests destroyed by the landowner.

Murphy Island - Had 60 nests with no destruction.

Lake Ontario:

Bass Island-Management control activities throughout May and June, all nests were removed.  There was a range of 19-348 nests removed at each site visit.

Gull Island-All nests removed, ranging from 21-188 each time.

Calf Island-All nests removed, over 539 by early June.

Little Galloo Island-The peak number of nests were 3967, the lowest number since 1989.  Eggs were oiled for the sixth consecutive year and it is predicted less that 150 young were fledged. 

Lethal Control-225 adults were taken by DEC, more were taken from Calf Island by USDA, no numbers were available.  Little Galloo-18, Calf-37, Gull-3, Bass Island-167, also several hundred nests were shot out of trees on these islands.


Weekly Great Lakes Water Levels for September 3, 2004 

Current Lake Levels: 

Currently, all of the Great Lakes are higher than the levels of a year ago.  Lakes Superior, Michigan-Huron, St. Clair, and Erie are 6 to 12 inches higher than last year.  Lake Ontario is currently 4 inches above last year’s level.  Lakes Superior and Michigan-Huron are still below their long-time averages by 5 and 10 inches, respectively. Lake St. Clair is currently at its long-time average level. Lakes Erie and Ontario are above their long-time averages by 4 and 8 inches, respectively.


Current Outflows/Channel Conditions: 

The Lake Superior outflow through the St. Marys River into Lake Huron is expected to be near average during the month of September.  Flows in the St. Clair and Detroit Rivers are expected to be below average in September. The Niagara and St. Lawrence River flows are projected to be above average for the month of September.

 

Temperature/Precipitation Outlook: 

A slight chance of rain exists in the Great Lakes basin for the holiday weekend.  Temperatures will remain comfortable under sunny skies.  The remnants of Hurricane Frances could bring significant rainfall to parts of the Great Lakes basin next week.

 

Forecasted Water Levels: 

Lake Superior is approaching the end of its seasonal rise and is expected to remain steady over the next month.  Lakes Michigan-Huron and St. Clair will continue their seasonal decline and are expected to drop 1 and 6 inches, respectively, over the next month.  Lakes Erie and Ontario will continue their seasonal decline, dropping 5 and 7 inches, respectively, over the next month.

 

Alerts:

Users of the Great Lakes, connecting channels and St. Lawrence River should keep informed of current conditions before undertaking any activities that could be affected by changing water levels.  Mariners should utilize navigation charts and refer to current water level readings.


General

California revives plan to create string of restricted fishing zones along coast
 SAN FRANCISCO — State wildlife officials announced plans recently to revive a program to create marine reserves along California's 1,100-mile coast. The program would set up restricted fishing zones expected to serve as models for protecting ocean habitat.

Plans for the state-mandated network were shelved eight months ago because of budget woes. State agencies have now secured $2 million from private donors and $500,000 in state funding.  The program represents a new approach to marine conservation. Rather than protecting individual fish species, reserves seek to protect entire marine ecosystems and restore fish species depleted by overfishing, pollution, and other human activities.

The marine reserves would only cover state waters, which extend 3 miles from the coast. Some experts estimate 10 to

20 percent of the coast could be off-limits to fishing.  Many commercial and recreational fishers are opposed.

 

"We don't know that they're going to work. I think there needs to be more studies done," said Bob Strickland, president of the United Anglers of California. "I don't like the idea that they're getting money from outside sources who have an agenda."  Private donations were led by the Resources Legacy Fund Foundation in Sacramento.

California already has a number of protected marine areas, but many have conflicting boundaries and restrictions. The new initiative is an effort to develop a more systematic statewide approach to protecting coastal habitat.  A task force will oversee planning and solicit views from fishers, environmentalists, recreation groups, and others. The task force, along with a scientific advisory board, will then draw up a new set of reserves.   A statewide plan is expected by 2011.


Illinois

$29 million appropriated for construction of World Shooting & Recreational Complex.

Governor Rod R. Blagojevich and Illinois DNR Director Joel Brunsvold announced the Illinois General Assembly has approved $29 million in funds to undertake the development of

the Sparta World Shooting & Recreational Complex. This will be the largest shooting / recreational complex in the nation and is anticipated to draw hundreds of thousands of visitors annually to the facility located outside of Sparta, in Randolph County Illinois.


Construction under way at World Shooting & Recreational Complex at Sparta

In mid-July, Illinois DNR Heavy Equipment Crew (HEC) began construction of berms required for the 12-station cowboy shooting area and a rifle and pistol  range containing more than 100 stations. An earthen embankment consisting of 100,000-plus cubic yards of soil is required for these facilities. Calling in the HEC was necessary to complete the shooting berms in time for the first Illinois State Cowboy Shooting Championship, to be held at Sparta in July 2005.

 

Almost 300 participants in colorful and historic garb, and more than a thousand spectators and vendors are expected to attend this initial event. Involving the HEC also ultimately reduces project costs. An additional benefit of berm construction is the expansion of onsite wetlands by approximately 6 acres. Working with Southern Illinois University, a wetland mitigation plan for the site was developed to address the borrow material excavated by the

HEC. When complete, the borrow pit will create an expanded wetland that will not only be attractive to wildlife but will serve as the home to retriever dog trials hosted by the site. While construction of the facility will not be complete by the 2005 state championship, DNR is committed to undertaking sufficient development to insure that a quality event occurs. By the 2006 championship, site construction should be complete, allowing for an even larger turnout.

 

Once completed in August of 2006, this facility will house the largest shooting complex in the nation and the largest campground in Illinois. It will generate millions of dollars to the local and state economies and create hundreds of

full- and part-time jobs in the area. This multi-recreational facility will be home to the Amateur Trap Shooting Association s Grand American in August of 2006, the largest National shooting event in America. More than 150,000 attendees are anticipated to visit the site annually for this event alone.


Indiana

Venison workshops Sept 13, 14, 15

Learn how to process and prepare venison at one of three September workshops sponsored by Purdue Cooperative Extension Service.  The program features a deer processing demonstration. Purdue Chef Emeritus Hubert Schmeider will teach participants butchering, preparation and cooking techniques.

 

Each workshop will also address food safety and handling procedures, and concerns about chronic wasting disease.  All programs start at 6 p.m. local time and the workshop fee is $10.

 

For more information or to register, contact an extension

educator at one of the events listed below:

 

Newton County - September 13

Beaver Township Community Center (Morocco)

Contact Newton County Extension, 219-285-8620

 

Whitley County - September 14

Northeast Purdue Ag Center (Columbia City)

Contact Whitley County Extension-260-625-3313

 

Steuben County - September 15

4-H Exhibit Hall, Fairgrounds (Angola)

Contact Steuben County Extension-260-668-1000 ext. 1400


State reports record steelhead run

"It's official: Indiana's St. Joseph River steelhead run is a record-buster", reports South Bend Tribune journalist Louis Stout.

 

Bob Bell, assistant manager at Bodine Hatchery in Mishawaka, said 4,496 steelhead were counted going over the South Bend ladder through Aug. 20.   "That's a record for us," said Bell. "We've never passed more than 2,000 before Sept. 1."  Does the glut of steelhead in Hoosier waters serve 

as a sign of things to come? "At this point, we've got two guesses," said Bell. "Either a lot of the summer fish ran early and we may not get many more, or there's more coming and it's going to be a great fall. I tend to be an optimist and think it's going to be a great steelhead season."

 

Lake Michigan biologist Brian Breidert reports that steelhead also are in Trail Creek in Michigan City and that a few coho have been caught.


Michigan

Michigan blocking regional water protection deal

Agreements to protect Great Lakes water from being diverted to Asia or Arizona are doomed unless Michigan follows the lead of other states and enacts a water use law, a high-ranking state official said on September 3. “Right now Michigan is blocking a water protection deal” said Tom Hamilton. “I attended this meeting two days earlier with MDEQ Chief Steve Chester concerning the Charter Annex 2001.

 

The Charter Annex 2001 set regionwide standards on new or increased large-scale water withdrawals. They amend the 1985 Great Lakes Charter signed by two Canadian provinces and eight U.S. states. "This won't take effect unless everyone agrees," Ken DeBeaussaert, director of the state's Office of the Great Lakes, said during a visit to Grand Valley State's Annis Water Resources Institute in Muskegon.

 

The Muskegon Chronicle reports nearly 20 years after the Charter set guidelines for protecting and managing Great Lakes waters, Michigan remains the only one of the eight U.S. states that has not passed a water use law.  The Annex won't be worth the paper it's printed on unless Michigan enacts a state law governing water withdrawals that meets the limits agreed to by the others, DeBeaussaert said.

 

Annex 2001 requires regional approval for all new, large-scale water withdrawals from lakes, streams and groundwater aquifers in the Great Lake basin. It also imposes some

restoration and conservation requirements, though it wouldn't affect existing water withdrawals. If Michigan fails to enact water use legislation it would thwart the international effort to keep decisions on Great Lakes water usage within the Great Lakes basin, DeBeaussaert said.

 

The state's failure to regulate water withdrawals is one reason Nestle North America is expanding its Ice Mountain bottling operations in the state.

 

The Annex requires region-wide approval for all diversions out of the Great Lakes basin which average 1 million gallons daily for 120 days. The Annex also requires approval of any new or increased withdrawals for "consumptive use" which average 5 million gallons daily over a 120-day period.

 

The Annex is really two documents. The first, called the Great Lakes Basin Sustainable Water Resources Agreement, is a good faith agreement between the eight U.S. states and two Canadian provinces. The second, called the Great Lakes Basin Water Resources Compact, is an agreement among the eight U.S. states to make joint decisions regarding water use.

 

The Great Lakes contain 92 percent of the United States' surface water. However, the agreements cut both ways: In addition to regulating diversions, they also require region-wide approval on large-scale water withdrawals within each of the states.


Whistleblower Claim Revived in Fish Kill Pollution Case
Unanimous Court of Appeal Panel Sends Case to Trial

Detroit, MI — A unanimous Michigan Court of Appeals panel ruled that an environmental whistleblower case can proceed to trial. The case involves a Gratiot Conservation District manager who was fired after reporting pollution violations and financial irregularities.

 

Robin Berryhill’s job was to monitor non-point sources of water pollution. In January of 2002, the Conservation District fired Berryhill for reporting major water quality violations, including pollution discharges and fish kills in Pine Creek, to the state's Department of Environmental Quality, contrary to District directives.

 

In addition to refusing to obey the illegal orders, Berryhill

reported dubious fiscal management of the Conservation District, including the practice of “double dipping” grant money” i.e., accepting duplicate payment for the same activity from more than one source. On March 10, 2003, the 29th Circuit Court dismissed Berryhill’s complaint, filed under Michigan's Whistleblower's Protection Act.

 

Last month, the state Court of Appeals reversed that dismissal, characterized the earlier action of trial court as “factually and legally flawed.” Berryhill’s suit seeks reinstatement, lost wages and other appropriate damages. It will now be scheduled for a jury trial.

Berryhill is represented in the suit by Scott A. Brooks, an attorney with the Detroit labor law firm of Gregory, Moore, Jeakle, Heinen & Brooks, and PEER, a national environmental whistleblower defense organization.


Minnesota

Multiple approaches needed to improve Leech Lake walleye fishing

Cormorant control, stocking walleye, and changing regulations needed

In an effort to improve Leech Lake walleye fishing, the Minnesota DNR and Leech Lake Band will address issues raised by the area community about controlling cormorants, stocking walleye, changing walleye regulations and conserving and restoring habitat.

    

Approximately 200 people attended a citizen input meeting on August 25 in Walker to express concern over an increase in fish-eating cormorant and a decrease in walleye fishing quality.

   

"The citizens spoke and we heard them," said Mark Holsten, DNR Deputy Commissioner. "We want the situation to improve and we will work with the local community to do just that." Holsten was among several DNR staff that participated in last week's meeting, which was sponsored by the Leech Lake Association and facilitated by environmental specialist Don Hickman of the Initiative Foundation.

    

The DNR, Leech Lake Band and Leech Lake area residents have met several times since last spring. All agree the number of nesting double-crested cormorants has increased significantly, that Leech Lake has not produced a strong walleye year class since 1997 and that the situation needs greater attention. Citizens at Wednesday's meeting strongly supported controlling cormorants. The group also expressed various levels of support for walleye stocking and developing a special fishing regulation that could lead to more restrictive harvest regulations in 2005.

    

Cormorant control is often misunderstood, in part, because the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service issued a rule late last year that grants some authority to the DNR and tribal officials to control the birds in order to prevent harm to fish and other public resources. The rule, however, retains the federal government's ultimate authority for managing this species under the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

    

"Cormorants can be shot under Minnesota law because they are unprotected species." explained Holsten. "However, the cormorant is protected under federal law. The DNR can not control 90 % of the cormorant population without demonstrating why control is necessary with scientific data."

   

Holsten said local citizen and intergovernmental cooperation is critical, especially with the Leech Lake Band. That's because the Leech Lake cormorants nest on Little Pelican Island, which is owned and managed by the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe. "As we work through this issue our approach must  

reflect the federal government's regulator authority and the band's right to manage their lands." 

 

Holsten said the DNR will initiate immediately four inter-related actions with citizens and others to improve walleye fishing on Leech Lake:   

 - Develop options for proposed special fishing regulations that will be discussed with citizens this winter and potentially implemented in the 2005 fishing season 

 - Coordinate with the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe to initiative cormorant control and collaborate on research that will help the DNR comply with the federal government's regulatory process. The Leech Lake Band was notified last week that it will receive a grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that will allow the Band, DNR, University of Minnesota and others to examine the affects of cormorant predation on walleye and perch populations in Leech Lake     

 - Stock specially marked walleye fry in 2005 to help determine why small walleye numbers are in short supply    

 - Develop long- and short-term habitat goals that minimize or eliminate impacts to fish habitat. This will be done in conjunction with the tribe and Governor's Water Initiative for potential application in other parts of the state.

 

"Our Leech Lake fisheries staff, as well as others in the DNR, are increasingly concerned about cormorants' affect on fishing. This is due to their rising numbers and recent research from Lake Oneida in New York that speaks to impact a large cormorant population can have on a fishery," said Ron Payer, DNR fisheries program manager. He added the DNR and citizens need to work together to "understand why the lake hasn't produced a strong walleye class in recent years and to achieve the outcomes we all want."

 

Hickman, the facilitator of last week's meeting, said the majority of participants viewed controlling the cormorant as a key outcome. He added that when asked for a show of hands, a significant majority expressed support for posting the lake in preparation of the development of more restrictive fishing regulations.

 

Today, the North American cormorant population is estimated at upward of two million, with the bulk of them nesting in Great Lakes states and Canada. Minnesota has about 35 cormorant colonies, a number that is higher than in recent decades but believed to be less than in earlier historical times. At Leech Lake, the cormorants are out-competing the common tern, a state-threatened species that nests alongside the cormorants on Little Pelican Island. Initial efforts to reduce their nesting habitat last fall failed to have an impact on the size of the breeding population in 2004. Today, about 5,000 cormorants nest on Little Pelican Island, about twice the number as in 2003.


DNR to hold open house on proposed forest and trail use - Oct. 27

Motor vehicle use in the Solana and Wealthwood state forests

The Minnesota DNR is holding an open house on proposed motor vehicle use classification and forest road and trail designations for two state forests located in southern Aitkin County. 

 

The proposals address motor vehicle use in the Solana State Forest, located north of McGrath and the Wealthwood State Forest, located on the north shore of Mille Lacs Lake. The DNR proposal would classify the 68,000-acre Solana State Forest as "limited," which means that motor vehicle use is permitted only on roads and trails signed as open to motor vehicle use. The DNR proposal would classify the 15,000-acre Wealthwood State Forest as "closed" which means that highway-licensed vehicles must stay on forest roads and that there will be no off-highway vehicle (OHV) trails.

 

The proposed forest road and trail use designations are the result of 2003 legislation directing DNR to review motor vehicle use in state forests and to designate forest roads and trails that will be open to motorized uses. The proposals address use by all types of motor vehicles, including highway-

licensed vehicles and OHVs. OHVs include all-terrain vehicles, off-highway motorcycles and off-road vehicles such as four-wheel-drive trucks, but not snowmobiles.

 

An informational open house is scheduled for 6 - 9 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 27, at the Hazelton Town Hall located south of Aitkin on Highway 169. The DNR will make a formal presentation at 7 p.m., followed by a question and answer session. DNR staff will be available to throughout the open house. Written comments on the proposed trail designations can also be submitted at the meeting.

 

Copies of the proposals and maps detailing the DNR's forest road and trail use recommendations are available on the DNR Web site at www.dnr.state.mn.us/input/mgmtplans/ohv/designation/status.html

 

The proposals can also be obtained from Jack Olson, DNR natural resources planner, 1601 Minnesota Drive, Brainerd, MN  56401; or by calling (218) 828-2701. Written comments on the proposal must be submitted by 4:30 p.m., Nov. 12.

    

Comments can be submitted by e-mail to jack.olson@dnr.state.mn.us or sent to the address listed above.


DNR stock lake sturgeon in Otter Tail Lake & Otter Tail River

The Minnesota DNR is taking another step forward in its 20-year plan to return the lake sturgeon to the Red River watershed. This was the fourth sturgeon release in the watershed since 1998. The DNR on Sept 2 stocked approximately 7,500 sturgeon fingerlings at two different locations in the watershed. The sturgeon recovery plan is a cooperative effort between the DNR, USFWS and the White Earth Band of Chippewa Indians.

Lake sturgeon were once abundant in the Red River, its tributaries and many lakes throughout the watershed, but the

construction of dams, poor water quality, habitat loss and over-harvest decimated the population. The removal or modification of dams on the Red River and in its tributaries has enabled sturgeon recovery efforts to proceed. Dam removal and modification creates fish passages, improves water quality and addresses safety concerns.

 


Ohio

Polluted water wells source of island illness

PUT-IN-BAY, Ohio Department of Health officials last week said that 32 private wells tested by the Ottawa County Health Department contained total coliform, which could indicate the presence of more serious bacteria or pathogens.  More than 30 residential wells on South Bass Island have tested positive for coliform bacteria, and state officials are focusing on water contamination as the probable source of an outbreak that has sickened more than 1,300 people.

The Ohio EPA has ordered the owners of those wells to stop using them.  The number of reported cases of gastrointestinal illness linked to South Bass Island reached 1,355 last week

 

 Ohio EPA officials say it is unclear how many residential wells are on the island, or where the contamination is originating.

Put-in-Bay Mayor Mack McCann said "I'm sure that the wells in the township will either all test negative or be shut down."

 


Pennsylvania

Game Commission to hold drawing for 615 Bobcat permits

HARRISBURG - With a limited bobcat season slated for the upcoming hunting and trapping seasons, more than 3,400 individuals have submitted an application for one of the 615 permits that will be selected by the Pennsylvania Game Commission at a public drawing on Friday, Sept. 10.  The computerized drawing will be held at 10 a.m. in the auditorium of the agency's Harrisburg headquarters, 2001 Elmerton Ave.

 

Applications from holders of resident furtaker licenses or junior or senior combination licenses, along with a non-refundable $5 fee, had to be postmarked no later than Aug. 20, or submitted via www.pgc.state.pa.us .  Those selected in the random drawing will receive one permit for no additional charge to either hunt or trap one bobcat.  The hunting season will run from Oct. 16- Feb. 19.  The trapping season will run from Oct. 17- Feb. 19.

 

Hunting and trapping bobcats is restricted to Wildlife

Management Units 2C, 2E, 2F, 2G, 3A, 3B, 3C and 3D.  A statewide map of the WMUs, as well as a series of maps of each WMU, appears on pages 47 through 51 of the 2004-2005 Pennsylvania Digest of Hunting and Trapping Regulations.

 

In 2000-2001, when the first bobcat hunting and trapping seasons in 30 years were held, hunters and trappers took 58 bobcats.  In 2001-2002, hunters and trappers harvested 146 bobcats.  In 2002-2003, hunters and trappers took 135 bobcats.  In 2003-2004, hunters and trappers harvested 140 bobcats.

 

"Based on the harvest success rate of these three seasons and our annual survey of unsuccessful bobcat permit holders, we conservatively have increased the number of permits allocated to move closer to our standing annual harvest objective of 175 bobcats," said Vern Ross, Game Commission executive director.


Pymatuning Waterfowl Expo scheduled for Sept 18-19

HARRISBURG - The Pennsylvania Game Commission's Pymatuning Wildlife Learning Center is gearing up for the 2004 Pymatuning Ducks Unlimited Waterfowl Expo on Sept. 18-19, in and around Linesville, Crawford County.  A highlight of the two-day event is the selection of the Pennsylvania Waterfowl Management Stamp from entries by many of the Commonwealth's most accomplished wildlife artists will be held at 1 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 18, at the Alice Schafer Elementary School, Linesville.

 

Exhibits by woodcarvers, taxidermists, crafters, hunting equipment vendors and others will be featured on Saturday and Sunday.  In addition, hunting dog demonstrations and duck calling contests will be held Saturday and Sunday.

 

As always, a feature of the Expo weekend will be a Game Commission-sponsored wildlife and nature amateur photography contest.  Contest details may be obtained by 

calling the Learning Center at (814) 683-5545, or writing to Pymatuning Wildlife Learning Center, 12590 Hartstown Road, Linesville, PA 16424.  Entries will be accepted from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. from Sept. 1-15, except Mondays and Tuesdays when the Center is closed.

 

The Learning Center activities and exhibits will be open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sept. 18 and 19.  Exhibits on the grounds of the Learning Center include those from: the Purple Martin Conservation Association; the Conneaut Lake/French Creek Valley Conservancy; the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources' Bureau of Forestry; the Natural Resource Conservation Service; and the Pennsylvania Urban and Community Forestry Council.

 

Additional activities at the Learning Center include: at 11:30 a.m. on Sept. 18, a waterfowl information and banding program, with the opportunity for children to assist in the release of wild ducks; short wildlife-related programs and activities will be conducted both days at 1 p.m.


Middle Creek to host Wildfowl show Sept 18-19

HARRISBURG - The Pennsylvania Game Commission's Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area will host its 18th Annual Middle Creek Wildfowl Show on Sept. 18-19.   The event will be held from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day.  Admission is free, but donations are graciously accepted and benefit the Wildlands Preservation Fund to preserve wild lands.  Middle Creek is along Hopeland Road, two miles south of Kleinfeltersville, on the Lebanon-Lancaster county line.

 

The show features wildfowl carvings, artwork, collectibles and carving supplies from over 60 vendors from as far away as

Florida and Canada. Retriever demonstrations will be at 10 a.m. and noon on Saturday, Sept. 18, and at 11 a.m. and 1

p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 19.  Two different retriever clubs will display their dogs' abilities, both with water retrievals, and upland retrievals.

 

Decoy competitions will be held at 1 p.m. on Saturday, and winners will be announced at 4 p.m.  Pennsylvania State Duck and Goose Calling Championships will be held at 2 p.m. on Sunday.  Food vendors will be selling throughout the show.  For further information or directions, call 717-733-1512.


Ontario

Environment Ministry cites more Sarnia plants

Ontario's Environment Ministry investigators have cited 12 more Sarnia industries for violating provincial laws. The agency have notified 20 Sarnia plants with non-compliance orders for problems that include dumping or chemical leaks into the St. Clair River.

The ministry's investigators audited the operations of most of the community's petro-chemical plants, and 20 have been found to be in violation of Ontario laws. The companies cited have up to one year to meet the Environment Ministry's guidelines.

 


arrowUSFWS Press Releases  arrowSea Grant News

State Fish Pages

Illinois - Indiana - Michigan - Minnesota - Ohio - Pennsylvania - New York - Wisconsin - Ontario

 

Home | Great Lakes States | Membership | Exotics Update | Great Links

Pending Issues | Regional News | Great Lakes Basin Report | Weekly News / Archives 


All contents Copyright © 1995 - 2004, GLSFC All Rights Reserved.

Web site maintained by JJ Consulting